All Course Descriptions

Undergraduate 2018-2019
ACC   ACT   AED   ART   ASL   ATR   AYA   BIO   BOL   BRW   BUS   CED   CHE   CIS   COM   CORE   CRM   CRM333 SLU   ECE   ECO   EDU   ENG   ESF   ETH:PHI   ETH:REL   EXC   FIN   FOR   GEG   GEO   GRD   GST   HIS   HLT   HON   IDS   INF   JCG   LCE   LGS   LIB   MCE   MGT   MKT   MTH   MUS   NUR   PHI   PHY   PSC   PSY   RDG   REL   RPS   SED   SOC   SPA   SPM   SST   SWK  

ACC 213 Principles of Accounting I (3)
This course introduces the student to the characteristics and basic concepts of accounting, the recording process, adjusting the accounts, completion of the accounting cycle, accounting for merchandising operations, internal control and cash, accounting for receivables, inventories, plant assets: acquisition, depreciation, disposals, natural resources, intangible assets, current liabilities, payroll accounting and basic accounting principles.

ACC 214 Principles of Accounting II (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 213
This course is a continuation of ACC 213 and introduces the student to accounting for partnerships, corporations: organization, capital stock transactions, dividends and retained earnings, income reporting, long-term liabilities, investment, statement of cash flows, financial statement analysis, managerial accounting, job order costing, process costing, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgetary planning, and performance evaluation through standard costs.

ACC 301 Intermediate Accounting I (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 214 or equivalent
This course provides the student with an in-depth study of financial accounting standards, conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, a review of the accounting process, statement of income and retained earnings, balance sheet and statement of cash flows, accounting and the time value of money, receivables, valuation of inventories, acquisition and disposition of property, plant and equipment, depreciation, depletion, and intangible assets.

ACC 302 Intermediate Accounting II (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 301
This course is a continuation of ACC 301 and covers current liabilities and contingencies, long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity: contributed capital and retained earnings, dilutive securities and earnings per share calculations; investment, revenue recognition, accounting for income taxes, pensions and post-retirement benefits, leases, accounting changes and error analysis, and statement of cash flows.

ACC 304 Cost Accounting (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 214 or equivalent
Basic concepts and techniques of product and service costing, including process and job order costing, standard costs, budgeting and management use of cost accounting information.

ACC 304H HON:Cost Accounting (0)
Course description as stated in ACC 304 (Honors Course)

ACC 330 Accounting for Non-Profit and Government Entities (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 214 or equivalent
This course will give the student an overview of financial reporting for governmental and not-for-profit entities general, special revenues, capital projects, debt service, internal service, enterprise, and fiduciary funds, long-term debt and fixed asset accounting groups, and planning and control of cash and temporary investments.

ACC 340 Taxation I (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 214 or equivalent
Fundamentals of tax law application with emphasis on federal tax laws applicable to individual taxpayers.

ACC 341 Taxation II (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 340 or equivalent
Fundamentals of tax law application with emphasis on federal tax laws applicable to corporate taxpayers.

ACC 341H HON: Taxation II (0)
Course description as stated in ACC 341 (Honors Course)

ACC 341S Serv Lrng:Taxation II (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ACC 341
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ACC 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

ACC 403 Auditing (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 214
This course examines auditing theory and practice, emphasizing basic auditing concepts and principles, professional standards of auditing, audit procedures, preparation of auditing working papers, preparation of internal and external audit reports, and professional ethics in auditing.

ACC 440 Theoretical Topics in Accounting (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 302 or equivalent
This course will provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the development of accounting theory, income concepts, financial statements: the income statement, balance sheet and statement of cash flows; working capital, long-term assets: property, plant and equipment; investments, intangibles, long-term liabilities, accounting for income taxes, leases, pensions and other post-retirement benefits and equity.

ACC 445 Accounting Information Systems (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 301 and either CIS 135 or CIS 203
This course focuses on understanding how technology can enable key financial accounting activities. The student will be introduced to processing and reporting of accounting requirements using various types of accounting information systems (AISs). Students will apply risk assessment tools and evaluation techniques related to defining, implementing, and managing accounting information systems. Topics include data modeling, documenting systems, and developing and implementing effective AISs.

ACC 445H HON:Accounting Information Sys (0)
Course description as stated in ACC 445 (Honors Course)

ACC 481 Advanced Accounting Problems (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 302
This course will expand the student's understanding of corporate expansion and accounting for business combinations, intercorporate investments in common stock, reporting entity and consolidated financial statements, branch operations, segment and interim reporting, and partnerships: formation, operation, changes in membership, and liquidation.

ACC 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

ACT 118 Archery (1)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with basic archery, and to gain a level of understanding and competency toward the sport. Proficient shooting skills are emphasized. Handouts, videos, discussions and practice will provide the conceptual knowledge for these skills.

ACT 119 Begin Racquetball (1)
This course involves instruction on the rules, safety and etiquette of the sport of racquetball as well as acquainting student with the fundamental skills, techniques and strategies in racquetball.

ACT 121 Beginning Golf (1)
This course involves instruction on the rules, safety and etiquette of the sport of golf as well as acquainting students with the fundamental skills, techniques and strategies of golf.

ACT 130 Yoga (1)
This course is designed to meet the interest of students who desire to participate in and develop increased health, body awareness, and balance. This course will introduce and develop strength and flexibility through the practice of Hatha Yoga. Students will learn basic poses with appropriate modifications, if needed. The benefits of incorporating Yoga practice into their life will be discussed.

ACT 131 Tai Chi Chuan (1)
Tai chi chuan is an introductory Chinese Martial Art course that is performed slowly, in a relaxed fashion with fluid graceful motions. It is based on traditional Chinese philosophies and is useful for body and mind. It increases balance, range of motion, and helps to relieve stress. Basic concepts and principles of nutritional and physiological fitness are included in the course.

ACT 132 Meditative Practice (1)
Students will study the fundamental philosophy, form and practice of meditation. Each class session will consist of readings, out of class writing assignments, class discussion, and guided or silent meditation practice. Covering the basic principles of posture, breathing, attention, concentration and awareness, the intention of this course is to empower and inspire students to continue a lifelong, rewarding relationship with "silence". For those who are willing, the promise of this course and this art form is the cultivation of mind and heart.

ACT 141 Ultimate Frisbee (1)
Strategy, game rules and functions of participation will be discussed. Sport history will be studied. Students will participate in activities within a formatted tournament setting.

ACT 142 Snow Skiing and Snow Boarding (1)
New Course
This is a physical activity course designed to instruct students in the fundamentals of snow skiing and snow boarding. The class is conducted at a local snow skiing facility. Fees associated with equipment rental, ski lessons, and pass are required for the course.

ACT 143 Beginning SCUBA Instruction (1)
New Course
Provides training toward certification as an open water SCUBA diver. The course emphasizes the learning of snorkeling (free diving introduction) and SCUBA skills. Safe diving skills, the physics of diving, equipment care and maintenance, diving fitness, underwater navigation, record keeping, and other basic SCUBA knowledge will be covered in the course. Fees associated with equipment rental (regulators and tanks) are required for the course.

ACT 150 Individualized Exercise (1)
Includes basic strength training workouts in the weight room, plus various types of aerobic conditioning routines. Emphasis is placed on improving muscular strength, cardiovascular endurance and flexibility.

ACT 151 Walking & Running Fitness Class (1)
New Course
Walking and running are lifetime fitness activities. Completing distances longer than 1-2 miles, however, often requires motivation and should include a progressive training plan to avoid injury. Students will develop the skills needed to create a personalized 8 week walking and running training plan and learn strategies to maintain motivation for improved health, physical fitness, and performance. Class sessions will include daily physical activity, walking/running terminology and training systems, flexibility, strengthening, and cross training strategies, and journaling. Students will participate in a walk/run at the end of the semester suitable to their training status.

ACT 160 Fundamentals of Personal Fitness (1)
This course is designed to introduce the fundamentals of exercise and guide students through a personal fitness program focused on lifelong activity. Students will be guided through the practice of proper performance and safety measures. Baseline measures will be assessed to establish goals, and track performance progress. Foundational concepts of nutrition, exercise physiology, and training components (frequency, intensity, type and time) will be incorporated into the program.

ACT 175A Intercol Women's Volleyball (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175B Intercol Women's B-Ball (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175C Intercol Softball (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175D Intercol Men's Tennis (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175E Intercol Football (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175F Intercol Baseball (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175G Intercol Wrestling (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175I Intercol Women's Soccer (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175J Intercol Men's Basketball (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175K Intercol Women's Cross Country (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175L Intercol Men's Cross Country (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175M Intercoll Women's Golf (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175N Dance Team (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Dance Team members only

ACT 175O Cheerleading (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Mount Cheerleaders only

ACT 175P Intercol Men's Golf (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175Q Intercoll Women's Track/Fld (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175R Intercoll Men's Track/Fld (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175T Intercoll Women's Tennis (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175U Intercoll Men's Soccer (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175V Intercoll Men's Lacrosse (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175W Intercoll Women's Lacrosse (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 175X Intercol Men's Volleyball (0-1)
Prerequisite(s): Intercollegiate athletes only

ACT 196 Advanced Strength Training (1)
Prerequisite(s): ACT 160
This course will review content introduced in ACT 160. Students will learn the essentials of program design and implementation as well as create a balanced individual training program based upon personal goals and needs. Advanced lifts will be introduced and students will expand upon learned skills in a fitness program designed for greater intensity and physiological demands. This course will reinforce the benefits of exercise and provide comprehensive information on training adaptations, function and structure of body systems, and nutritional factors in health and performance.

AED 290 Comprehensive Art Ed I (3)
Prerequisite(s): AED Majors Only
Introduction to the theory and practice of teaching art in grades prekindergarten to six utilizing a discipline-based art education approach. Focus on the planning and teaching of art and on the uses, meaning and value of art in people's lives. Includes art media, techniques, processes, structures, functions; lesson planning, artistic development; personal expression; aesthetic and critical responses; motivational techniques; classroom management, community resources; field experiences in the pre-K to 6th grade level setting. Art majors only.

AED 390 Comprehensive Art Education II (4)
Prerequisite(s): AED 290
Continuation of the theory and practice of teaching art, with an emphasis on the secondary school level. Explores issues related to art education: art production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics; Ohio's Model Competency-Based Program-performance and instructional standards, assessment strategies, intervention; National Visual Arts standards. Includes curriculum unit planning; resources and materials; evaluation and grading; adolescent/young adult artistic development-expression and response; teacher characteristics; space/facility planning; Internet research and retrieval; health and safety standards; advocacy; resume & portfolio development; contemporary issues (including multicultural appreciation and gender awareness). Clinical/field experiences related to grades 7-12 setting. Art majors only.

AED 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A part-time work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

ART 100 Art & Design Foundation Seminar (1) A
Concurrent requisite(s): ART 110
This required course for all art and design freshmen teaches foundational techniques for reading, writing, and thinking about art and design. Writing assignments are both academically and creatively focused. Class presentations and research work serve as introductions to the work of significant contemporary thinkers and practitioners in art and design.

ART 101 Foundation Drawing I (3) A/CAM
Fundamental drawing approaches using various drawing media and techniques. Course work includes common projects focusing on teaching specific skills for ART, IAD, and GRD majors. These include the study of perspective, color, and rapid visualization drawing. Other studio projects and sketchbooks involve the students in the creative expression possible through drawing. Research, writing assignments, and critiques develop students' abilities to think critically about their own work and the subject area.

ART 102 Foundation Drawing II (3) A/CAM
Prerequisite(s): ART 101 or equivalent
This course is designed to provide students with continued exploration of the principles of drawing. Students will explore new media and techniques not covered in Drawing I as well as continue to improve on skills they have learned. Projects will involve the use of color and encourage expressive use of each medium. A variety of tools, techniques and materials will be used during the semester. Examples of master drawings as well as previous students' work will be presented to illustrate concepts discussed in class.

ART 103 Foundation of Visual Thinking (3) A/CAM
Prerequisite(s): High School Drawing Recommended
This course is an introduction to the fundamental elements and principles of design. Assignments deal with an understanding of color, line, positive and negative shape and space, and the ability to think of a variety of visual problems in terms of organized relationships using traditional and digital media.

ART 106 Foundation 3-D Visual Communication (3) A/CAM
Prerequisite(s): High School Drawing Recommended
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles of Three-Dimensional Design. Through a sequential analysis of form in space, students will develop projects that put into practice the most universal concepts of design. Projects will emphasize the importance of planning and craft. A variety of tools, techniques and materials will be used during the semester. Examples of master designers and sculptors as well as previous students' work will be presented to illustrate concepts discussed in class. Text readings along with individual and group discussions further understanding of the weekly assignments.

ART 110 Foundation Portfolio Review (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ART 100 or Instructor Permission
This is a required course for all art and design freshmen. It is designed to give students guidance in the preparation of a portfolio for review by the art and design faculty at the end of the second semester. The portfolio must present specific examples of the student's best work from the Foundation sequence courses: ART 101 Drawing Foundation I, ART 102 Drawing Foundation II, ART 103 Foundation of Visual Thinking, ART 106 Foundation 3-D Visual Communication, GRD 104 Digital Literacy I, GRD 105 Digital Literacy II, and a writing sample from ART 100 Art and Design Foundation Seminar. Satisfactory completion of the Review is a requirement for graduation.

ART 121 World Art (3) A/CAM
World Art is a general survey of visual arts around the world with concentration on key western and eastern cultures, periods and artists, from prehistory to present day.

ART 123 Historic Preservation (3) A
The course is designed to provide an introduction to a working knowledge of Historic Preservation. Topics will include philosophy of preservation, architectural styles and research, preservation planning and zoning, roles of local, state and federal governments, advocacy, preservation economics, conservation techniques, and heritage tourism-course includes field trips and guest speakers.

ART 127 World Art:Magical & Spiritual (3) CAM
Survey of World Art I is a survey of visual arts and architecture around the world, from prehistory to 1400. Attention is given to the essential role of art in the religions and cultures of the world, as well as on formal and aesthetic issues. We will achieve this examination through classroom lecture and discussion, films, written assignments, a museum scavenger hunt, and a field trip.

ART 127H HON:World Art:Magical & Spiritual (0) CAM
Course description as stated in ART 127 (Honors Course)

ART 129 World Art:Heroes and Donors (3) CAM
Survey of World Art II is a survey of visual arts and architecture around the world, from 1400 to the present. Attention is given to the essential role of art in the religions and cultures of the world, as well as on formal and aesthetic issues. We will achieve this examination through classroom lecture and discussion, films, written assignments, a museum scavenger hunt, and a field trip.

ART 129H HON:World Art:Heroes and Donors (0) CAM
Course description as stated in ART 129 (Honors Course)

ART 140 Ceramics (3) A/CAM
Explores principles of working in clay using handbuilding methods: coil, slab, pinch, and drape. Includes study of clay traditions in pottery, sculpture, figure, narrative, decoration, mark making, and glazing.

ART 181 Basic Camera Techniques (3) A/CAM
This course is an introduction to the technological and aesthetic skills needed for photography. The course focus is on learning how to use digital cameras, or film equivalents, to produce color images. There is not a darkroom component to this course.

ART 201 Art Special Topics (3) A/CAM
Courses offered on an occasional basis to explore subject matter of special interest or timely relevance, often utilizing local exhibitions or themes.

ART 214 Comics & Narrative Art (3)
New Course
This course is an introductory course about Comics, Cartoons and Graphic Novels. This class uses both technical and artistic methods to explore the fundamentals of black & white comic narratives. Attention is also focused upon the specific writing techniques needed to develop stories, plots, characters, gags and punch lines. Course includes study of the history, traditions and genre classifications in comics.

ART 216 Watercolor (3) A/CAM
Prerequisite(s): High School Drawing Recommended
The course is an exploration of the special characteristics of watercolor as a painting medium for illustration and fine art. It is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the principles of watercolor painting including: color mixing, brush handling, composition, control of the medium and technique.

ART 217 Painting (3) A
Prerequisite(s): ART 101/Equiv
An introduction to fundamental painting concepts, tools, materials, and practices. Intensive exercises introduce students to both oil and acrylic paints: students choose one of the two to use for the second half of the semester. Projects are grounded in traditional methods while developing each student's individual approach to painting. Visits to exhibitions, readings and writing supplement studio practice.

ART 229 ART History:Special Topics (3) A
Utilizing timely exhibits at the Cincinnati Art Museum and the Taft Museum of Art, we will investigate photography of the early 20th century. Specific focus will be on Pictorialism and the emergence of straight photography.

ART 230 History of Design:Hand Made to Apple (3) A/CAM
A survey of visual communication from pre-history through the present. Emphasis is placed on the contemporary period focusing on graphic, industrial and environmental design. Lecture.

ART 231 Modern Art:Subconscious Lure (3) A/CAM
Over the course of this semester, we will examine a survey of European and American art from Neo-Classicism through Contemporary movements. Emphasis is placed on painting and sculpture, as well as photography, performance and video art, and some architecture. We will achieve this examination through classroom lecture and discussion, written assignments, exams, and a field trip.

ART 232 Art History:Women Artists (3) A/CAM
This course will investigate the position and contributions of women artists throughout the history of art. Lecture.

ART 234 Art History: Photography (3) A/CAM
Photographs have become an integral part of our world. It is hard to imagine a time without photographs. This course will take the learner to a time when photography was just a dream and bring them back to the present. Along the way, we will explore how photography came to become such an important part of our lives.

ART 239 American Art:Plucky Originality (3) A/CAM
Over the course of this semester, we will examine a survey of European and American art from Neo-Classicism through Contemporary movements. Emphasis is placed on painting and sculpture, as well as photography, performance and video art, and some architecture. We will achieve this examination through classroom lecture and discussion, written assignments, exams, and a field trip.

ART 243 Collage Workshop:Methods, Materials and Techniques (3) A
New Course
Prerequisite(s): ART 103
Course Description: An exploration of the endless possibilities of collage as an art form. Attention will be given to the multitude of materials and tools available, the various practical skills for developing and strengthening "by hand" technique/craft, methods for using collage as creative problem solving and/or personal expression, as well as the historical and conceptual ideas connected with the collage genre.

ART 244 Art History:Non-Western Survey (3) A
This course is a survey of Non-Western cultures: Africa, India and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, Korea, Oceania, and Native America. We will study their artistic achievements from pre-historic through contemporary times as expressed in painting, sculpture, prints, and calligraphy as well as architecture, gardens, decorative arts, graphic arts and photography. Lecture.

ART 276 Introduction to Hot Glass (3) A
This course teaches the students the basic hand skills and mental processes necessary to manipulate molten glass into a pre-conceived form, as well as safety and health concerns. Slides, videos, discussions and independent research will introduce the students to the history of glass, the Studio glass Movement, and current glass art.

ART 278 Matisse & Picasso (3) A

ART 280 Principles of Animation (3) A
An introduction to the theory and practice of animated film. Includes the equipment and process needed to move from a creative idea to a creative film. Techniques include drawing on film, claymation, cutouts, pixillation, puppets, and computer generation.

ART 281 Digital Photography I (3) A/CAM
Photography 1 is an introduction to the technological and aesthetic skills needed for photography. Students will learn to use digital cameras to produce both color and black and white images. Photography is defined as writing with light. It has its own language. Through the creation and viewing of photographs students will learn how a photograph can impact themselves and the world in which they live.

ART 282 Alternative Film and Darkroom Processing (3)
This is an advanced darkroom course that emphasizes traditional and digital methods for producing photographic fine art. Traditional and experimental methods include, but are not limited to: cyanotype, hand coloring, liquid light, multiple image montage, tinting and toning, and digital printing.

ART 301 Figure Drawing (3) A
Prerequisite(s): ART 101
Basic drawing practice is applied to drawing the human form. Students work from male and female models. Emphasis is placed on advancement of drawing skills on all levels. Basic anatomy is covered, as is an advanced exploration of compositional and content issues involved in depicting the human figure in space.

ART 302 Advanced Drawing (3) A
Prerequisite(s): ART 101 and ART 102
Skills in drawing realistically and imaginatively are assumed. Exploration of advanced concepts, issues and strategies in drawing. Emphasis is on individual theme/statement development: class meetings are primarily critiques of outside work. Discussion and research of contemporary issues in drawing is ongoing throughout the semester.

ART 304 Sculpt Wkshp:Figure Modeling (3) A
Prerequisite(s): Instructor Approval
FIGURE MODELING: The course will focus exclusively on the figure. Students will work in a more traditional approach to figure sculpture: preparation drawings and clay maquettes will be done directly from observation of the figure; polymer resin casts will then be made from relief or three dimensional molds; surface finishing will complete the process.

ART 317 Painting Workshop (3) A
Prerequisite(s): ART 216 or ART 217 or Instructor Approval
Advanced development of painting concepts, paint handling, color knowledge, and composition. Critical emphasis is placed on the development of content and intention in the work of each individual. Class meetings are primarily critiques of outside work. Discussion, assigned reading and research of contemporary painting issues are ongoing throughout the semester. This course requires a mature level of painting discipline, self-motivation and commitment to painting.

ART 328D Fiber and Fabric (3) CAM
Textile art structures that incorporate both fiber and fabric manipulation in contemporary ways. Techniques may include (but are not limited to): collage, stitchery, applique, reverse applique ("mola"), quilting, and trapunto stuffing. Examination of work from the leading global practitioners and artists in textiles, while building on design ideas and creative processes will be the focus.

ART 330 Art Criticism (3) A/CAM
Art Criticism promotes critical thinking about aesthetics. Reading and writing art criticism are integral activities. The course explores the role of art in our culture. Field trips to area art galleries and museums are included. We will achieve these goals through classroom lecture and discussion, guest speakers, readings on the history of aesthetics and manners of discussing art, gallery visits and discussions, and writing progressively in-depth reviews and critiques of art.

ART 336 Sculpture Wkshp:Sustainable Mixed Media (3) A/CAM
This CORE course is designed for art and non-art majors. It is an elective course for the Sustainable Studies Minor. It blends sculptural methods and current technologies with traditions of the past. Participants will explore sustainable processes and materials. Beyond the making of art, emphasis will be placed on the conceptual; consideration of the effect of creation of this work on the planet's resources. ART 336/536 will meet together.

ART 337 Pastel Landscape (1.5) A
New Course
Students discover creative possibilities and techniques of drawing in pastel and investigate strategies for producing vibrant images using this expressive medium. The principles of landscape design, perspective and color theory will complement the experience of direct observation in natural settings.

ART 339 Oil Painting Landscape:En Plein Air (1.5) A
New Course
Students discover the unique experience of oil painting outside the studio and investigate strategies for capturing light and color with paint. The principles of landscape design, perspective, proportion and color theory will complement the experience of direct observation in natural settings.

ART 341 Ceramics Workshop:Using The Wheel (3) A/CAM
A multilevel course that accommodates beginning work on the potters wheel, as well as advanced throwing and handbuilding, surface decorating, use of multiple clay bodies, glazemaking, loading and firing kilns. Emphasis on developing personal style and expression in claywork in addition to control and participation in production from start to finish. May be taken more than once for development of individual skills in any of the above categories.

ART 347 Drawing on Fabric (3) A
Prerequisite(s): ART 101, ART 103 or Instructor Approval
Direct application of pigments on cloth using pastels, markers, paints and various tools; also, fabric manipulation.

ART 349 Professional Prep for Artist (3)
New Course
This course for art majors and minors shifts the focus to an emphasis on professional practices to prepare the student artist for an active art life after graduation. Utilizing texts such as Art, Inc. along with fieldtrips, hands-on learning experiences, and a variety of professional mentors, student artists will engage in topics including photographing work, portfolios, artist CVs and resumes, writing about and for art, exhibiting and selling work, and various educational and career opportunities. Overall, Art 349 N1's goal is to support, mentor, and critique fine arts/art majors and minors in an informative, creative, and developmental process. Through an introduction to many of the aspects that play a role in the life of a professional working artist, this course seeks to assist the growth and evolution of each student's individual art practice from the studio to work habits and life strategies that will serve their calling.

ART 350C Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 350E Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 350I Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 350L Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 350M Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 350P Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 362 Printmaking Workshop:Methods Survey (3) A/CAM
Prerequisite(s): High School Drawing Recommended
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a working knowledge of relief, intaglio and planographic printmaking processes. These processes involve the use of various tools and materials to print images from vinyl, wood and linoleum blocks, metal and stone. Through hands-on experience, students will put into action printmaking techniques that are demonstrated in class and outlined in handouts. The relationship between drawing, design and printmaking is also a focus of the course.

ART 365 Internship in Gallery Management (1-3) A
Prerequisite(s): Gallery Director's Signature
Practical problems in gallery work: contacting artists, handling contracts, sales; practice in management of an art gallery. Limited to selected students.

ART 367 Fabric Printing (3) A
Prerequisite(s): One college art studio course or web approval by instructor
Images are transformed from printing plates to cloth. Processes may include (but are not limited to) relief, stencil, monoprinting, cyanotype, photo transfer, marbleizing, screenprinting (film-cut, photographic emulsion).

ART 368 Fabric Dyeing (3) A
Prerequisite(s): ART 101, ART 103 or Instructor Approval
Use of fiber-reactive dyes on cloth, processes may include (but are not limited to) batik with wax resist; direct painting with wax, gutta, other resists; thickened dyes, sized fabric; compression dyeing.

ART 380 Digital Photography II:Advanced Photoshop and Lightroom Techniques (3) A
Prerequisite(s): ART 281 or instructor Approval
The fundamentals of digital photography are explored using Adobe PhotoShop. Topics include, but are not limited to: cameras, scanners, printers, software, and copyright concerns. Individual students do not need a digital camera.

ART 381 Advanced Photography Workshop (3) A
Prerequisite(s): ART 281 or Instructor Approval
Advanced photographic skills are explored with a focus on lighting, portfolio development, professional development, and studio use. This course may be taken more than once.

ART 395 Pre-Thesis Independent Study (3)
Pre-Thesis Independent Study. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 395E Pre-Thesis Independent Study (3)
Pre-Thesis Independent Study. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 395I Pre-Thesis Independent Study (3)
Pre-Thesis Independent Study. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 395L Pre-Thesis Independent Study (3)
Pre-Thesis Independent Study. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 395M Pre-Thesis Independent Study (3)
Pre-Thesis Independent Study. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
An art-related work experience supervised by an art faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation and evaluation. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated up to nine credit hours.

ART 400 Senior Art Seminar (1)
A reading, thinking, writing, and discussion course to fulfill the Capstone requirement. It is taken concurrently with the Senior Thesis (ART 495, GRD 456, or IND 410) requirement. This course focuses on the ability of Art majors to define their Liberal Arts Education in relationship to their artist self, to the six Baccalaureate level core curriculum Learning Outcomes, and to the role of contemporary artists and designers in the world.

ART 490 Advanced Studio Problems (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor and Chairperson
Problems in studio arts under supervision of a faculty member. Learning contract required.

ART 495 Thesis (3)
Prerequisite(s): Art majors only; Previous experience and/or advanced work in thesis area
Concurrent requisite(s): ART 400
In-depth independent study, research and application in a specific field of visual art, chosen by the student, approved by the art faculty resulting in a culminating exhibit in the senior year. Required for a degree in art as evidence of the student's ability to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired at the college level. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 495E Thesis (3)
In-depth independent study, research and application in a specific field of visual art, chosen by the student, approved by the art faculty resulting in a culminating exhibit in the senior year. Required for a degree in art as evidence of the student's ability to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired at the college level. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 495I Thesis (3)
In-depth independent study, research and application in a specific field of visual art, chosen by the student, approved by the art faculty resulting in a culminating exhibit in the senior year. Required for a degree in art as evidence of the student's ability to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired at the college level. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 495L Thesis (3)
In-depth independent study, research and application in a specific field of visual art, chosen by the student, approved by the art faculty resulting in a culminating exhibit in the senior year. Required for a degree in art as evidence of the student's ability to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired at the college level. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 495M Thesis (3)
In-depth independent study, research and application in a specific field of visual art, chosen by the student, approved by the art faculty resulting in a culminating exhibit in the senior year. Required for a degree in art as evidence of the student's ability to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired at the college level. Learning Contract and Approval of Art Department Chair Required.

ART 496 Co-Op:Alternating(FT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
An art-related work experience supervised by an art faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation and evaluation. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated up to nine credit hours.

ASL 101 Beginning American Sign Lang. I (3) LAS
An introduction to American Sign Language communication skills, basic ASL grammar, Deaf Culture and the Deaf Community.

ASL 102 Beginning American Sign Lang.II (3) LAS
New Course
Prerequisite(s): ASL 101
This course builds on skills and knowledge introduced in ASL 101 related to communication skills, basic ASL grammar, Deaf Culture and Deaf Community.

ATR 182R Foundational Skills in Athletic Training (Recitation) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 182
Foundation Skill in AT (Recitation)

ATR 214 Athletic Training Assessment & Mgmt I:Lower Extremity (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 180, ATR 181, BIO 197
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 214A
This course is an in-depth study of assessment and management techniques for musculoskeletal injuries/illnesses of the lower extremity that are incurred by athletes and others involved in physical activity. Topics include evaluation of the foot and ankle, lower leg, knee, thigh, hip and pelvis. Students will understand the phases of gait as well as the evaluation of abnormal and/or antalgic gait.

ATR 214A Athletic Training Assessment & Mgmt I (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 214
Course description as stated in ATR 214.

ATR 232 Clinical Perspectives I (1)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Clinical Phase of the AT program
This course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate knowledge and psychomotor skills of injury prevention, injury assessment, and management in an intercollegiate athletic training setting. Students will be evaluated on their clinical proficiency in taping, wrapping, bandaging and bracing, pre-participation screening, emergency management, wound care, and addressing environmental hazards into the care of patients in the clinical environment. This course requires clinical rotations under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer.

ATR 233 Clinical Perspectives II (1)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 232
This course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of injury prevention, orthopedic injury assessment, and management in an intercollegiate athletic training setting. Students will be evaluated on their clinical proficiency in taping, wrapping, bandaging and bracing, pre-participation screening, emergency management, wound care, and addressing environmental hazards into the care of patients in the clinical environment. This course requires clinical rotations under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer.

ATR 312 Therapeutic Modalities (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 214, BIO 197/197A, BIO 198
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 312A
This course is a survey of manual, mechanical, acoustic, and electromagnetic therapeutic agents utilized by athletic trainers and other allied health professionals in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and other disorders. Topics will include inflammatory response to tissue injury and infection, physiology of pain and pain management theories, application of and physiological responses to therapeutic modalities, and evidence-based clinical decision making.

ATR 312A Therapeutic Modalities (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 312
Course description as stated in ATR 312

ATR 315 Athletic Training Assessment and Mgmt II:Upper Extremity and Spine (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 214/214A
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 315A
This course is an in-depth study of assessment and management techniques for musculoskeletal injuries/illnesses of the upper extremity and spine that are incurred by athletes and others involved in physical activity. Topics include evaluation of the sacroiliac joint, lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand. Students will also understand the deviations from normal posture and its influence on injury risk.

ATR 315A Assessment and Mgmt II (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 315
Course description as stated in ATR 315

ATR 316 Therapeutic Exercise (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 315, ATR 350
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 316A
Students will demonstrate understanding of the theoretical principles underlying the use of therapeutic exercise in the care of injuries to athletes and the physically active population. Using biomechanical and physiological concepts of healing, the students will learn therapeutic exercises and rehabilitation techniques used to restore normal function in active individuals following injury or surgery.

ATR 316A Therapeutic Exercise (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 316
Course description as stated in ATR 316

ATR 325 Athletic Training Assessment and Mgmt III:Med Conditions (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 315/315A
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 325A
Students will study the assessment, pathology and treatment of common medical conditions specific to the field of athletic training. Students will learn to assess cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, neurological, and systemic diseases and conditions. The dosages, indications, contraindications, modes of action and regulation of various classes and subclasses of over the counter and prescription drugs and performance enhancing substances in athletics are discussed. Emphasis will include the legal, moral and ethical implications of drug administration by the athletic trainer.

ATR 325A Athletic Training Assessment & Mgmt III:Med Conditions (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 325
Course description as stated in ATR 325

ATR 332 Clinical Perspectives III (2)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 233
This course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of injury prevention, orthopedic injury assessment, and management in an intercollegiate athletic training and off-campus high school clinical settings. Students will be evaluated on their clinical proficiency in orthopedic injury assessment and management of the lower extremity. This course requires clinical rotations under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer on and off campus.

ATR 333 Clinical Perspectives IV (2)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 332
This course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of injury prevention, orthopedic injury assessment, therapeutic modality application, and management in an intercollegiate athletic training and off-campus high school clinical settings. Students will be evaluated on their clinical proficiency in orthopedic injury assessment and management of the upper extremity, lower extremity and spine. This course requires clinical rotations under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer on and off campus.

ATR 380 Independent Study in Athletic Training (1-3)
Independent study under the guidance of a faculty member to meet stated objectives. Written permission of department chairperson and faculty member required.

ATR 432 Clinical Perspectives V (3)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 333
This course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate mastery-level competence in healthcare facilities. Students will be evaluated on their clinical proficiency in assessment, management, rehabilitation, and treatment of orthopedic and medical conditions. This course requires clinical rotations under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer and other licensed healthcare professionals on and off campus.

ATR 433 Clinical Perspective VI (4) EXP
Prerequisite(s): ATR 432
This course focuses on complex medical problems and clinical experiences designed to integrate mastery-level competence as an athletic trainer in healthcare facilities. Students are evaluated on their clinical proficiency in assessment, management, rehabilitation, and treatment of orthopedic and medical conditions. The ability to administer and manage a healthcare facility is assessed. Preparation for the BOC examination and experiential learning experiences as required by the core curriculum are included. This course requires clinical rotations under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer and other licensed healthcare professionals on and off campus.

AYA 333 Adol/Young Adult Practicum (1)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School of Education and EDU 207
The 50 hour field introductory field experience is the central component of this one credit hour course. The student will be assigned to a specific school in grades 7-12 where he/she will participate in classroom observations for 10 weeks, with seminars back on campus. Students will teach a minimum of four lessons in the classroom, with scheduled mentor teacher and Mount supervisor evaluations. Teaching activities as designated by the instructor will be assigned in order to address educational theory, lesson plan formats, and classroom management plans. The overall goal of the course is to prepare students for the AYA 334 practicum and student teaching.

AYA 334 Adol/Young Adult Practicum II (2)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School of Education and AYA 333, EDU 207
The 70 hour field experience is the central component of this two credit hour course, a follow-up to AYA 333. The student will be assigned to a specific school in grades 7-12 where he/she will participate in flexible field hours Monday through Friday for 10 weeks, with seminars back on campus. Students will teach a minimum of four lessons in the classroom, with scheduled mentor teacher and Mount supervisor evaluations. Teaching activities as designated by the instructor and/or content areas methods specialist will be assigned in order to apply theory learned in prior course work. The overall goal of the course is to prepare students for student teaching.

AYA 345 Intro to Secondary Education (3)
Prerequisite(s): EDU 190 and EDU 217
This course is focused on best teaching practices to complement the development, needs and learning processes of students in grades 7 through 12. The course provides teaching theory and practices designed to elicit personalized, active student learning complimentary to adolescents' physical, cognitive, affective, emotional/psychological, moral /ethical, and social development. The focus is on pedagogical conditions that affect adolescents' development and learning processes. The course includes a component where participants review the research literature for best practices used within their content area. The course will include applying theory to practice through the planning of instruction, selection of teaching strategies, ethics, classroom management, multiculturalism, inclusion, diversity and motivation.

AYA 444 AYA Student Teaching (10)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Undergraduate Education Department and permission from Clinical Experience Director
An intensive full-day experience in teaching and related professional development. Student teaching allows the student to synthesize the theory and practice under the guidance of an experienced master teacher. This is an all-day experience lasting 12 weeks in the AYA (grades 7-12) program.

BIO 101 Introduction to Biology (4) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 101A
Basic concepts of cell biology, genetics, evolution, diversity of life, and ecology. This course is intended for non-science majors. Lecture, lab.

BIO 111 Principles of Biology I (4) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 111A and BIO 111R
A study of cell structure and functions, cellular energetics, genetics, and evolution and population biology. Lecture, lab.

BIO 111A Principles of Biology I (LAB) (0) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 111 & BIO 111R
Course description as stated in BIO 111

BIO 111R Principles of Bio I (Recitation) (0) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 111 and BIO 111A
General Biology Recitation

BIO 111S Serv Lrng:Principles of Biology I (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 111
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

BIO 112 Principles of Biology II (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 112A
Basic concepts of classification, a survey of the diversity of life, ecology, population biology, development, and behavior. Lecture, lab. Animal dissections required.

BIO 112A Principles of Biology II (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 112
Course description as stated in BIO 112

BIO 112H HON: Principles of Biology II (0) N
Course description as stated in BIO 112 (Honors Course)

BIO 130 Medical Terminology (2) LAS
This course is a basic coverage of medical terminology, including the roots, prefixes, and suffixes that comprise much of medical language. The course is suitable for all interests and majors, and will enable the student to more readily understand the human body in health and disease.

BIO 130S Serv Lrng: Medical Terminology (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 130
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

BIO 131 Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 131A
An overview of human structure and function with emphasis on basic concepts. A systematic approach along with integration of the following systems: skin integrity; skeletomuscular; metabolic homeostasis (cardiovascular, respiratory, immunity, digestive, urinary); neuro-endocrine regulation; reproduction and development. Lecture, lab. Animal dissections required.

BIO 131A Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology (LAB) (0) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 131
Course description as stated in BIO 131

BIO 140 Environmental Science (4) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 140A
Crosslisted GEO 140. An introduction to the basic principles and issues in Environmental Science. Topics include: physical and biological environments, and their intra-dependencies and inter-dependencies, resources and resource management, pollution, world-view, social justice, population and development --- global and local perspectives included. Scientific concepts necessary to understand these issues and to make informed decisions on environmental matters will be included. Fieldtrips required, during class/lab time.

BIO 140A Environmental Science (LAB) (0) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 140
Course description as stated in BIO 140

BIO 150 Dinosaur Biology (4) N/CN
An introduction to the study of dinosaurs, including their origin, anatomy, physiology, evolution, classification, behavior, ecology, and their impact on human culture.

BIO 197 Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Sciences I (4) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 197A
A study of the structure and function of the human body, including the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous-sensory systems. Discusses biological concepts and principles as a foundation for understanding normal developmental changes as well as pathological alterations. Includes clinical correlations in health practice. Lecture, lab. Animal dissections required.

BIO 197A Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Sciences I (LAB) (0) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 197
Course description as stated in BIO 197

BIO 198 Human A&P for Hlth Sci II (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 197 with a grade of "C" or better
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 198A
A study of the structure and function of the human body, including the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive systems. Discusses biological concepts and principles as a foundation for understanding normal developmental changes as well as pathological alterations. Includes clinical correlations in health practice. Lecture, Lab. Animal dissections required.

BIO 198A Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Sciences II (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 198
Course description as stated in BIO 198

BIO 201 Anatomy & Physiology I (4) N
Prerequisite(s): C or better in BIO 111 and C or better in both CHE 111and CHE 112
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 201A
A study of the structure and functions of vertebrate organ systems from an evolutionary perspective, with particular emphasis on the human body. This semester specifically introduces basic principles of anatomy and physiology, tissues, and the integumentary skeletal, muscular, nervous and sensory systems. Designed for biology and chemistry departmental majors. Lecture, lab. Animal dissections required.

BIO 201A Human Anatomy & Physiology (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 201
Course description as stated in BIO 201

BIO 202 Anatomy & Physiology II (4) N
Prerequisite(s): C or better in BIO 201
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 202A
A study of the structure and functions of vertebrate organ systems from an evolutionary perspective, with particular emphasis on the human body. This semester specifically covers the circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive, urinary, and digestive systems. Designed for biology and chemistry departmental majors. Lecture, lab. Animal dissections required.

BIO 202A Human Anatomy & Physiology II (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 202
Course description as stated in BIO 202

BIO 203 Developmental Biology (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 or BIO 111 or BIO 131 or BIO 197 and BIO 198
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 203A
A study of the molecular and cellular events involved in differentiation and development of organisms, as well as that of the morphogenesis of animal organ systems. Lecture, lab. Animal dissections required.

BIO 203A Developmental Biology(LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 203
Course description as stated in BIO 203

BIO 204 Biology Seminar (2)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111
This course will focus on scientific communication, including how to find and read scientific literature in order to enhance student research, data analysis, critical thinking, and presentation skills. Students will investigate careers and topics of interest in the biological and biomedical sciences. Limited to Biology or Biomedical Sciences majors.

BIO 212 Musculoskeletal Anatomy Review (2)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 197 or BIO 201
This course is an in-depth exploration of the human musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems. Both gross and surface anatomical features will be covered, including development of palpation skills to locate bony landmarks, muscles, tendons, joints, and ligaments on the living human body.

BIO 212S Serv Lrng:Musculoskeletal Anatomy Review (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 212
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

BIO 215 Introductory Microbiology (4) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 104, BIO 197, 198
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 215A
Basic principles of microorganisms presented with emphasis on diseases of bacterial and viral etiology and the body's defenses against such diseases. Primarily for nursing majors. Lecture, lab.

BIO 215A Introductory Microbiology (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 215
Course description as stated in BIO 215

BIO 218 Animal Behavior (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 or BIO 111 or BIO 131
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 218A
An introduction to the basic principles of animal behavior with an emphasis on the evolutionary responses of species to their environment. Human and non-human animals will be studied. Lecture, lab, and field trips.

BIO 218A Animal Behavior (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 218
Course description as stated in BIO 218

BIO 301 Pathophysiology (4)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 197-198, or BIO 201-202
Discussion of alterations in biological processes which affect the body's dynamic equilibrium (homeostasis). A conceptual approach presented by body systems, designed to integrate knowledge from both basic and clinical sciences. Discussion of causes of pathogenesis and compensatory mechanisms for disease states.

BIO 305 Microbiology (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111, CHE 111-112
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 305A
A study of microorganisms, their structures, functions, genetics, and evolutionary relationships, theories of infection and immunity. Primarily for biology and chemistry majors. Lecture, lab.

BIO 305A Micro (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 305
Course description as stated in BIO 305

BIO 305S Serv Lrng:Microbiology (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 305
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

BIO 307 Extreme Physiology (3) N
New Course
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111 and BIO 112 or Instructor Approval
This course will survey the mechanisms of animal survival under extreme conditions and explore how animal (including human) responses to these extreme situations have contributed to the advancement of medicine and our understanding of physiology. Topics covered will include adaptations that allow survival to high altitude, high pressure, extreme temperatures, low gravity, and other challenges like starvation and exposure to weapons of mass destruction.

BIO 307H HON:Extreme Physiology (0) N
New Course
Course description as stated in BIO 307 (Honors Course)

BIO 310 Cell Biology (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111 & 111A, CHE 111 & 111A & CHE 112 & 112A
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 310A
A study of the fine structure and function of eucaryotic and procaryotic cells and their organelles, the chemical composition and organization of cells, cell metabolism and bioenergetics, genetic regulation and cellular differentiation. Lecture.

BIO 310A Cell Biology (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 310
Course description as stated in BIO 310

BIO 315 Ecology (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111-112
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 315A
A study of the interactions that determine the distribution and abundance of organisms. Emphasis on local species. Lecture, lab, field trips.

BIO 315A Ecology (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 315
Course description as stated in BIO 315

BIO 318 Galapagos (3) N
New Course
Through an exciting field trip to the Galápagos Islands, this course examines the islands' geology, biological diversity, and the role the islands have played in the development of evolutionary thought.

BIO 320 Genetics (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111, CHE 111-112 and CHE 211 or Instructor Permission
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 320A
A study of molecular, classical and population genetics. Topics include (as time permits) inheritance, recombination, bacterial and viral genetics, genetic biochemistry, regulation of gene expression, and genomics. Lecture, lab.

BIO 320A Genetics (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 320
Course description as stated in BIO 320

BIO 326 Human Gross Anatomy (8) N
Prerequisite(s): One Year of College-Level Anatomy and Physiology or BIO 201, BIO 202 or BIO 197, BIO 198
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 326A
This course provides a complete study of the anatomy of the human body. This course is primarily designed for the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, and therefore, places emphasis on integrating basic knowledge gained in prerequisite coursework with an in-depth knowledge of the relationships of the skeletal, muscular, and peripheral vascular and nervous systems. It is only offered during summer term and on a space-available basis for non-DPT students.

BIO 326A Human Gross Anatomy (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 326
Course description as stated in BIO 326

BIO 330 Evolution (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111-112
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 330A
A study of the evolutionary process with emphasis on the history of diversity, mechanisms and speciation. Lecture, lab.

BIO 330A Evolution (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 330
Course description as stated in BIO 330

BIO 335 Entomology (4) N
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111-112
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 335A
The study of insects with emphasis on their morphology, physiology, ecology, behavior, evolution, and classification. Consideration will be given to integrated pest-management decision-making and the role insects have played in human culture. Lecture, lab. Animal dissections required.

BIO 335A Entomology (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 335
Course description as stated in BIO 335

BIO 340 Research in Biology (1-4)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 111-112, sophomore standing or beyond, minimum GPA of 3.5, and departmental permission.
In this course, the student will design and conduct a program of laboratory or field observations, experiments, or both, under the direction of a faculty member in the Department of Biology or a designee of the Department. The student will collect and interpret the data gathered in the course of these observations, experiments, or both, and will present the results of the work as agreed upon by the student and his or her research advisor. Normally this will include a presentation at the University's annual Celebration of Teaching and Learning and at a regional conference or authoring a written paper. Students completing the course with a grade of A or B will earn the departmental award "Graduation with Research Distinction".

BIO 341 Directed Study in Biology (1-4)
Prerequisite(s): Biology major and departmental permission
In this course, the student will pursue the focused study of a biological problem under the direction of a faculty member in the Department of Biology or a designee of the Department. The student will present an account of the work as agreed upon by the student and his or her research advisor. Normally this will include an oral presentation open to the public and a written paper.

BIO 342 Internship in Biology (1-4)
Prerequisite(s): Biology major and departmental permission
In this course, the student will participate in a practical experience at a business, hospital, laboratory, or other institution, under the direction of a faculty member in the Department of Biology or a designee of the Department. The internship is individually designed to provide the student with knowledge, skills, and practice, in a biologically or related profession or field of study. The student will present an account of the work as agreed upon by the student and the instructor-of-record of the course. Normally this will include an oral presentation open to the public, and a written paper.

BIO 360 Biological Psychology (4) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and BIO 131 or BIO 197 or BIO 201
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 360A
Crosslisted PSY 360. The physiological basis of behavior and mental processes. Includes neurophysiology, sense organs, neurotransmitters, and pathological maladies.

BIO 360A Biological Psychology (LAB) (0)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and BIO 131 or BIO 197 or BIO 201
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 360
Crosslisted PSY 360A. LAB to Accompany BIO 360 (Biological Psychology)Animal dissections required

BIO 396 Co-Op:Parallel (PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220 and departmental permission
A work experience approved and evaluated by a faculty member in the Biology Department, in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective or may count as a Core experiential learning credit upon completion of the work experience and documentation of compliance with a pre-approved learning contract. The course may be repeated up to nine total credit hours. Learning contract required.

BIO 397 Research Project Co-op:Parallel (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): CED 220 and departmental permission
Corequisite(s): CED 394
A research project within a co-op experience that must be pre-approved by the co-op employer, the Biology Department and cooperative education staff. A faculty member of the Department of Biology will oversee the research project co-op experience. Credit and a letter grade are awarded upon completion of the work experience and documentation of compliance with a pre-determined learning contract. This course may not count toward the experiential requirement of the Core Curriculum.

BOL 300 Leadership:Theory & Application (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
Explores the meaning and importance of leadership in our time, culture, and organizations. Emphasizes the importance of developing leadership as individuals and within organizations. The course focuses on theories of leadership and how they are applied to include leadership styles, behaviors, and skills.

BOL 350 Contemporary Issues in Leadership (3)
This course examines current issues for today's leaders such as leading a diverse workforce, leading virtual teams, and nurturing ethical leadership. Also reviews evolving perspectives on the role of the leader and the leader-follower relationship. Topics will be timely, relevant to organizations, with practical implications for leadership skill development.

BOL 400 Ethical & Servant Leadership (3)
This course is a study of the foundational role of ethics within the concept and practice of leadership. It emphasizes personal ethical development and application of ethical principles to organizational dilemmas and explores servant leadership in-depth to include the writings of Robert Greenleaf and others.

BOL 490 Leadership Capstone (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): MOL 350, 400, MGT 300, MGT 480, ETH:PHI 397, and 40 hours of core curriculum completed or permission of the instructor
Students will synthesize their study of leadership with their professional, organizational, and personal experiences and their previous learning in the liberal arts and sciences. Students will complete their leadership portfolios in which they reflect on their learning about leadership, development as leaders, and personal philosophy of ethical leadership. Case studies will present real world scenarios for analysis and application.

BRW 101 Beer Brewing and Appreciation (3)
Introduction to the science of brewing and beer appreciation. Topics include basics of the brewing process, proper sanitation, yeast management, recipe design, styles of beer, identification and controls of off-flavors, and packaging/storing of beer. Activities include brewing beer, touring a local brewery, and tasting common beer styles.

BUS 101 Introduction to Business (3)
Provides a general overview of the business environment and the practical vocabulary needed in actual work situations. This course offers information and career suggestions on functional business areas such as accounting, information systems, management, marketing, finance, economics, and production management. This course also provides information on major business topics such as investments, management issues and business trends. Required for all freshman business majors and recommended for those students who are undecided on their area of concentration.

BUS 210 Business Law I (3)
Crosslisted LGS 210. The study of the nature of law and the legal system, and its application to business and the marketplace.

BUS 260 Business Research (3)
Prerequisite(s): MTH 174 or 176
Provides a foundation for gathering information and making decisions in business. The course emphasizes the importance of information in business decision making -- when to seek information, where to seek information, how to obtain information, and how to use the information obtained. The course will enhance the student's abilities in formulating business problems and their solutions through applied research.

BUS 352 Business Communications I (3)
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and COM/ENG 101
Enhances the student's written and oral communication skills through emphasis on writing and evaluating business letters, memos and reports. Develops student's abilities to present ideas in an effective manner.

BUS 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

BUS 400 Business & Society (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300, Junior Status
Broadens and deepens student's understanding of ethical issues which businesses need to consider as part of responsible decision making. Analysis of stakeholders integrates the external and internal factors such as politics, competition, economic issues, technology with suppliers, competitors, political organizations, and employees. Does not fulfill liberal arts ethics requirement.

BUS 453 Current Topics in Business (3)
Prerequisite(s): Junior and Seniors
Covers selected topics in business. May be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

BUS 465 International Business (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
This course provides an understanding of the factors affecting business in a global arena. Specifically, this course analyzes the opportunities and problems associated with operating businesses in multiple countries, e.g., differences in the economic, social and cultural environment. In addition, students examine the need of the firm to modify values, systems, and techniques, when venturing into foreign markets. Students analyze the feasibility of the firm to enter foreign markets through the use of cases and a research feasibility project.

BUS 466 Global Commerce (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
This introductory course in global commerce will introduce students to all areas of international business activities and the environment within which business transactions take place. The main topics covered in this course will provide students with an understanding and appreciation of the following: Makeup of global business, its importance, theories of international business, trade, and investments and the U.S. position in the global market and its impacts on U.S. society. Other aspects will include the measurement of global business activities, exchange rates, national trade and investment policies as well as include the study of the legal, political and cultural environment of global business. Contemporary issues and their implications also will be addressed

BUS 490 Seminar In Business (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): Juniors and Seniors and permission of the instructor
Examines selected business topics in-depth through readings and group discussion. May be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

BUS 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

BUS 499 Business Policy Capstone (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): ACC 214, BUS 260, CIS 300, MGT 300, FIN 300, and MKT 300 plus 40 hours of core completed
A case study approach to general management situations. Integrated cases of substantial length and complexity are studied from the perspective of management. This is the "capstone" course of the business program.

CED 103 Study for Success (2)
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 115
This course is designed to promote the development of skills basic to success in college. The focus will be on the following skills that are needed in the college environment: reading in the content areas; strategies for effective note taking; preparing for a broad range of test formats; organizing and managing time; utilizing instructional resources; improving communication skills; goal-setting; becoming a self-advocate on a college campus.

CED 150 Career Exploration for Undeclared Majors (1)
Designed for freshmen and sophomores who have not yet chosen a major. Students will gain an understanding of the process of career decision making. They will learn how interests, skills and values relate to career choices, and acquire information about educational and career options. Emphasis is placed on self-evaluation, decision making and goal setting.

CED 150S Serv Lrng:Career Exp/Undeclared Majors (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CED 150
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CED 220 Foundations of Professionalism (1)
Prerequisite(s): Open to all full-time students at a sophomore level or above who have declared a major
Required for participation in the Cooperative Education program and is designed to prepare students for the cooperative education process. Students begin with self- assessment and skills analysis; then move on to career exploration, resume development, interviewing, job search strategies, and issues related to successful co-op work experiences.

CED 220S Serv Lrng:Professional Devel (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CED 220
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CED 300 Applied Peer Leadership Seminar (3)
Prerequisite(s): CORE 100
This course is designed to acquaint students with the theories, information, and skills for peer leadership. Students will gain an understanding of college student development, mentoring, communication, and a variety of other interpersonal and leadership skills; throughout the course, reflection and awareness of one's own styles and progress will be emphasized. The course is intended for students serving as peer leaders for CORE 100. A required practicum component also provides them with guided experience in applying this information in their role as a peer leader for a section of CORE 100.

CED 301 GRE Prep: Quantitative (1)
New Course
This course is designed to organize studying for the Quantitative sections of the GRE General Test. The two main areas of emphasis are reviewing mathematical concepts up through Algebra II and learning test-taking strategies. Practice tests will be taken throughout the course to aid in preparation for the actual exam.

CED 302 GRE Prep: Written and Verbal (1)
New Course
This course prepares students for the written and verbal portions of the GRE General Test. ScoreItNow is included in this course to provide automated essay scoring for two writing samples.

CED 305 Study Abroad (0) EXP
Prerequisite(s): Completion and approval of Study Abroad Verification Agreement, Proof of enrollment at host institution, Maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA and Full-time student status. Completion of CED 220 Recommended.
This course allows students who are choosing to participate in a study abroad program the opportunity to qualify that experience for the required EXP core graduation credit. Study abroad allows Mount students to experience the world, lending a global perspective and providing valuable opportunities for personal and professional growth. MSJ offers various options for study abroad through the AIFS program: long-term, traditional study abroad and short term study abroad.

CED 320 Building Your Professional Edge (1)
This course develops competencies for career readiness. Students begin with personality, skills and interest assessments and progress to advanced topics in career exploration and planning. This course satisfies a requirement for the Talent Opportunity Program (TOP)

CED 320S Serv Lrng: Building Your Professional Edge (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CED 320
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CED 394 Cooperative Education (0) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
For students placed in part-time work assignments through the Cooperative Education program. Successful completion of the work experience, validation of a learning agreement and evaluation of work performance is required. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

CED 396 Cooperative Education (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
For students placed in part-time work assignments through the Cooperative Education program. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, validation of a learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. A total of nine credits cumulative may be earned through co-op work experience. Students may choose 1-3 credits per semester with advisor's approval.

CED 420 Accelerating Your Professional Career (1)
Capstone course for professional development. Students use a variety of self-assessments including Strengths Finder to understand their communication and leadership styles and enhance their self-awareness. Students will also delve into topics including: generational differences, emotional intelligence, financial awareness, and career planning. The outcomes are focused on providing students leverage to be successful in their first professional career or graduate studies.

CED 420S Serv Lrng: Accelerating Your Professional Career (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CED 420
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CED 494 Cooperative Education (0) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
For students placed in full-time work assignments through the Cooperative Education program. Successful completion of the work experience, validation of a learning agreement and evaluation of work performance is required. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

CED 496 Cooperative Education (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
For students placed in full-time work assignments through the Cooperative Education program. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, validation of a learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. A total of nine credits cumulative may be earned through co-op work experience. Students may choose 1-3 credits per semester with advisor's approval.

CHE 104 General, Organic and Biochemistry (3) N/CN
Prerequisite(s): High school chemistry or equivalent; Math placement 3 or higher or Grade of "C" or better in MTH 098 or MTH 097
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 104A,CHE 104R
An overview of general, organic, and biochemistry. Emphasis will be on structure, bonding, and reactions of inorganic and organic compounds important in living systems.

CHE 104A General & Organic Chemistry LAB (1) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 104,CHE 104A
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in CHE 104.

CHE 104R Gen & Organic Chem (Recitation) (0) N/CN
General & Organic Chem (Recitation)

CHE 105 Chem for Everyday Living (4) N/CN
Prerequisite(s): Math placement 3 or higher
The basic principles of chemistry will be introduced in the context of things that affect everyday living. The course is intended for non-science majors. Lecture, lab.

CHE 111 General Chemistry I (3) N/CN
Corequisite(s): MTH 099 or MTH Placement 4 or Higher
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 111A, CHE 111R
Fundamental principles of chemistry including dimensional analysis, atomic theory, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, thermodynamics, electronic structure, periodic trends, chemical bonding, and molecular geometry. For majors in chemistry, biochemistry, biology, and several pre-health majors.

CHE 111A General Chemistry I (LAB) (1) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 111, CHE 111R
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in Chemistry 111.

CHE 111R General Chem I (Recitation) (0) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 111, CHE 111A
General Chemistry I (Recitation)

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (3) N/CN
Prerequisite(s): CHE 111A and a grade of "C" or better in CHE 111, a grade of "C" or better in MTH 099
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 112A, CHE 112R
A continuation of CHE 111. Topics include gases, intermolecular forces, solution properties, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and electrochemistry. For majors in chemistry, biochemistry, biology, and several pre-health majors.

CHE 112A General Chemistry II (LAB) (1) N/CN
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 112, CHE 112R
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in CHE 112.

CHE 112R General Chemistry II-Recitation (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 112, CHE 112A
General Chemistry II - Recitation

CHE 175 Scientific Literacy and Popular Media (4) N
New Course
This course is designed for non-science or science majors and asks students to explore the relationship between popular media news stories and the actual research upon which they are based. Emphasis will be placed on basic scientific literacy the scientific method data analysis, and critical interpretation of the way information is collected and presented to the public by the media.

CHE 200 Chemistry Sophomore Seminar (1)
Prerequisite(s): CHE 112
An introduction to scientific communication skills. Students will learn to search the scientific literature, properly cite references, write and present scientific information. The course includes chemistry seminars and a discussion of scientific ethics.

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (3) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 112 with a Grade of "C" or Better
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 211A
Principles of organic chemistry; theories of bonding and mechanisms; typical carbon compounds, their preparation, properties and reactions.

CHE 211A Organic Chem I (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 211
Laboratory practice in the classical and instrumental techniques of organic chemistry; techniques for the safe preparation, purification and analysis of typical organic compounds.

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (3) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 211A and a grade of "C" or better in CHE 211
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 212A
Laboratory practice in the classical and instrumental techniques of organic chemistry; application of techniques for the preparation, purification and characterization of organic compounds.

CHE 212A Organic Chemistry II (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 212
Laboratory practice in the classical and instrumental techniques of organic chemistry; application of techniques for the preparation, purification and characterization of organic compounds.

CHE 212H HON:Organic Chemistry II (0) N
Course description as stated in CHE 212 (Honors Course)

CHE 300 Chemistry Junior Seminar (1)
New Course
Prepares students to begin their independent research projects. Course will help student focus their research questions, and conceptualize their research problems on many levels from layman to specialist.

CHE 314 Intermediate Analytical Chem (3) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 112 or equivalent
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 314A
Theory and calculations involved in data treatment, equilibrium, volumetric analysis, and electroanalytical techniques. Introduction to instrumental analysis.

CHE 314A Intermediate Analy Chem (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 314
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in CHE 314

CHE 314H HON:Intermed Analytical Chem (0) N
Course description as stated in CHE 314 (Honors Course)

CHE 315 Instrumental Analysis (3) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 112/112A
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 315A
Theories on which modern instrumental techniques are based, including chromatography and separations; optical, atomic and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and radiochemical methods.

CHE 315A Instru Analysis (LAB) (1) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 112/112A
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 315
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in CHE 315.

CHE 317 Modern Methods of Structure Determination (4) N
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CHE 104 or CHE 111
Theory and practice of modern spectroscopic methods used to determine the structure of molecules.

CHE 325 Biochemistry I (3) N
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or Better in CHE 212
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 325A
A study of the physical and chemical aspects of biological activity. Topics include: the structure and chemistry of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, enzyme cofactors, carbohydrates, DNA, and lipids; biological acid-base equilibria; enzyme kinetics; bioenergetics and carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism; oxidative phosphorylation; membranes and biosignalling.

CHE 325A Biochemistry I (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 325
Experiments will be performed which illustrate some common techniques used in biochemistry such as UV-VIS, buffers, determination of protein concentrations, SDS-PAGE, chromatographic separations, and enzyme kinetics. The course focuses on the chemical theories and principles underlying the experiments, proper laboratory techniques, obtaining accurate results, and oral/written communication skills related to biochemistry research.

CHE 325H HON:Biochemistry I (0) N
Course description as stated in CHE 325 (Honors Course)

CHE 326 Biochemistry II (3) N
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or Better in CHE 325
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 326A
A study of the physical and chemical aspects of biological activity. Topics include: nucleic acid structure/function; DNA packaging/organization, replication, recombination, and damage/repair; transcription and translation; regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; biosignalling; microRNA, fundamentals of recombinant DNA and modern biotechnology.

CHE 326A Biochemistry II (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 326
Experiments will be performed which illustrate common techniques used in biochemistry such as UV-VIS, determination of nucleic acid concentrations, agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR, and bioinformatics. The course focuses on the chemical theories and principles underlying the experiments, proper laboratory techniques, obtaining accurate results, and oral/written communication skills related to biochemistry research.

CHE 340 Special Topics in Chemistry (3) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 212
Two or more topics of current interest will be considered. Announcement of topics will be made when course is offered.

CHE 350 Physical Chemistry I (3) N
Prerequisite(s): A Grade of "C" or Better in CHE 112, a Grade of "C" or Better in MTH 192
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 350A
A calculus based problem-solving approach to the theories and principles of chemistry. Emphasis is on thermodynamics and statistical mechanics.

CHE 350A Physical Chemistry I (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 350
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in CHE 350

CHE 355 Physical Chemistry II (3) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 350
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 355A
A calculus based problem-solving approach to the theories and principles of chemistry. Emphasis is on quantum mechanics and kinetics

CHE 355A Phys Chemistry II (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 355
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in CHE 355.

CHE 360 Intermediate Inorganic Chem (3) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 212, CHE 350
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 360A
Models and theory of inorganic chemistry beyond that covered in general chemistry. Chemical bonding theory and a study of representative members of the Periodic System.

CHE 360A Int Inorganic (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): CHE 360
Laboratory practice in the classical and instrumental techniques of inorganic chemistry as well as laboratory application of the concepts introduced in CHE 360.

CHE 370 Organometallic Chemistry (3) N
Prerequisite(s): CHE 212
A study of the synthesis, structure, and reactions of compounds containing metal-carbon bonds. Applications in organic synthesis and catalysis will also be presented.

CHE 370H HON:Organometallic Chemistry (0) N
Course description as stated in CHE 370 (Honors Course)

CHE 390 Research Problems in Chemistry (1-4)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
Problems in chemistry for selected students, pursued under the supervision of a faculty member. Variable credit, four credit maximum permitted toward degree.

CHE 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A chemistry related work experience supervised by a Chemistry Department faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of a predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. The course may be repeated for a maximum total of six credits.

CHE 400 Chemistry Seminar & Capstone (1)
Prerequisite(s): 40 hour of Core completed
The senior seminar and capstone experience is the culmination of the students' college chemistry education. Students will attend professional scientific presentations, while at the same time preparing a presentation, both oral and written, of their own research. Students will also work with instructors and peers to put current or historical issues in chemistry into a wider social/ethical context.

CHE 401 Natural Science Seminar (1)
New Course
This course is designed to have students in the Natural Sciences program demonstrate their background and mastery in the areas of chemistry, biology and physics. Students will apply their knowledge in these areas to current and historical issues that face the scientific community and general population as a whole.

CHE 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A chemistry related work experience supervised by a Chemistry Department faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of a predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. The course may be repeated for a maximum total of six credits.

CIS 103 Spreadsheet Basics (1)
Learn the basic operations of a microcomputer spreadsheet program. Produce files and financial reports supporting work in other courses. Use tools to perform what-if analysis for decision making. Perform numeric calculations, create graphs and database records. Lab.

CIS 135 Spreadsheets (3)
Progress from basic spreadsheet operations on microcomputers to more intermediate applications. Learn to efficiently produce worksheets. After mastering the basic features of creating, editing and formatting a spreadsheet, work with more advanced formulas and functions, perform what-if analysis, create graphs and databases, and work with macros. Lab.

CIS 135H HON:Spreadsheets (0)
Course description as stated in CIS 135 (Honors Course)

CIS 203 Business Information Technology (3)
This course introduces and develops understanding and application of spreadsheet operations in the context of management information systems and business operations. After mastering essential spreadsheet functions, students will develop spreadsheets to perform what-if and sensitivity analysis, summarizing and reporting. The goals, components, and development of all levels of business information systems will be examined, to include hands-on use of microcomputer productivity software for management, communication and decision-making.

CIS 230 Structured Programming (3)
Students learn structured programming methodology by designing, coding and testing programs which generate a variety of typical business informational reports and process typical business transactions.

CIS 270 Object Oriented Applications (3)
Prerequisite(s): CIS 230
Students learn event driven and object-oriented programming by using and developing objects for graphical user interfaces and applications, which can be executed over the World Wide Web and Intranets.

CIS 300 Business Info Systems (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 213, CIS 135, MGT 300
An introduction to the goals, components and development of all levels of information systems. The course includes hands-on use of microcomputer productivity software for management, communication and decision-making. Students use spreadsheets to perform what-if and sensitivity analysis, summarizing and reporting.

CIS 320 Advanced Programming Concepts (3)
Prerequisite(s): CIS 310
Students learn advanced programming concepts, including multi-dimensional arrays, graphics, report designers, advanced data handling, accessing databases, ActiveX controls and web applications.

CIS 375 System Architecture (3)
Prerequisite(s): CIS 310
Students learn hardware/software technology concepts to enable them to understand the relationship of computer architecture components and the efficiency considerations necessary for effective use in a business environment.

CIS 375S Serv Lrng:System Architecture (1) EXP
Corequisite(s): CIS 375
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CIS 386 Topics in Technology II Intermediate (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CIS 185, CIS 235, CIS 300
Topics in Information Technology II is the second in a series of three courses offered to all CIS majors. Students in various stages of their CIS degree program will take these classes together with one instructor. The students will work together to gain exposure and master new and emerging technologies using emersion techniques, individualized mentoring, and team strategies. Students will also complete several projects enhancing their understanding and applying their knowledge of different phases of the systems development life cycle. Students enrolled in the courses each time will perform different tasks and have different roles, depending on their academic and career goals and the level of ability. Students taking CIS 387 will take on more leadership roles or more experienced technology lead roles based on their experiences from the first two times taking the course. Each student will complete a learning contract at the beginning of the class, outlining their personal goals and objectives. The instructor will choose topics based on trends in the industry, incorporating theories and practices for hardware, software, operating systems, data representation, internet, systems analysis, systems design, modeling, training, documentation, and systems architecture. Students will continue to explore careers in information technology to advance their academic plan to help them obtain a professional position after graduation that will be a step in achieving their overall career goals. Objectives are achieved by using analytic techniques, gaining hands-on exposure to the tools used by IT professionals, and working in a team environment.

CIS 387 Topics in Technology III Advanced (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CIS 185, CIS 235, CIS 300
Topics in Information Technology III is the third in a series of three courses offered to all CIS majors. Students in various stages of their CIS degree program will take these classes together with one instructor. The students will work together to gain exposure and master new and emerging technologies using emersion techniques, individualized mentoring, and team strategies. Students will also complete several projects enhancing their understanding and applying their knowledge of different phases of the systems development life cycle. Students enrolled in the courses each time will perform different tasks and have different roles, depending on their academic and career goals and the level of ability. Students taking CIS 387 will take on more leadership roles or more experienced technology lead roles based on their experiences from the first two times taking the course. Each student will complete a learning contract at the beginning of the class, outlining their personal goals and objectives. The instructor will choose topics based on trends in the industry, incorporating theories and practices for hardware, software, operating systems, data representation, internet, systems analysis, systems design, modeling, training, documentation, and systems architecture. Students will continue to explore careers in information technology to advance their academic plan to help them obtain a professional position after graduation that will be a step in achieving their overall career goals. Objectives are achieved by using analytic techniques, gaining hands-on exposure to the tools used by IT professionals, and working in a team environment.

CIS 388 Topics in Technology IV Supplemental (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CIS 185, CIS 235, CIS 300
Topics in Information Technology IV is a Supplemental course to the three course series offered to all CIS majors. Students preparing to complete their CIS degree can take this class along with other CIS majors with one instructor. The students will work together to gain exposure and master new and emerging technologies using emersion techniques, individualized mentoring, and team strategies. Work in this course is expected to be at a higher level than the project and training work completed in the CIS 385, CIS 386, and CIS 387 courses. Students will also complete several projects, demonstrating and documenting their understanding of different phases of the systems development life cycle. Each student will complete a learning contract at the beginning of the class, outlining their personal goals and objectives. The instructor will choose topics based on trends in the industry, incorporating theories and practices for hardware, software, operating systems, data representation, internet, systems analysis, systems design, modeling, training, documentation, and systems architecture. Students will continue to explore careers in information technology to advance their academic plan to help them obtain a professional position after graduation that will be a step in achieving their overall career goals. Objectives are achieved by using analytic techniques, gaining hands-on exposure to the tools used by IT professionals, and working in a team environment.

CIS 394 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (0) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
For students placed in part-time work assignments through the Cooperative Education program. Successful completion of the work experience, validation of a learning agreement and evaluation of work performance is required. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

CIS 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

CIS 480 System Development Project (3)
Prerequisite(s): CIS 320 and CIS 330
This course presents students with a business need or problem and requires the student to develop an information system solution following all stages of the system development life cycle: systems analysis, systems design, programming, implementation, and evaluation. Students have the opportunity to apply the programming, database and analytical skills developed within the other required computer information systems courses.

CIS 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

COM 100 Spoken Word (3) C
Spoken Word develops students' understanding of interpersonal, small group, and public communication principles, processes, and practices, and focuses on enhancing students' overall communication competency. Emphasis is placed on developing effective and ethical listening and speaking strategies needed in personal, academic, civic, and professional life.

COM 100S Serv Lrng:Spoken Word (1) EXP
Corequisite(s): COM 100
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 201 New Media, Culture & Society (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, ENG 101
New Media, Culture & Society develops students' knowledge, understanding, and critical analysis of mass and new media (including books, newspapers, magazines, film, radio, television, and the Internet) and their relationship to contemporary culture. The course deals with the history of mass media, including economic, technological and cultural aspects; the political, psychological, and sociological impacts of mass media; and related ethical implications. The course extends beyond mass media into the new media environment which includes converged media, participatory media and social media.

COM 201S Serv Lrng:New Media, Culture & Society (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 201
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 202 Intro to Communication Theory (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, ENG 101
An introduction to the field of communication as a distinct area of study and practice, including theoretical approaches, methods, content areas, and rationales for scholarship commonly found within the field; and a study of major communication theories and research findings. Emphasis is placed on application of theories to particular contexts as a way of illuminating possibilities for improving human communication practice.

COM 202S Ser Lrng:Intro to Communication Theory (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 202
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 211 New Media Theory (3)
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, ENG 101
New Media Theory serves as an introduction to the critical study of digital media and culture. This course critically examines key theoretical approaches to understanding and analyzing the role of digital and interactive media in contemporary society and culture. The course is designed to introduce students to theoretical ideas that can be used as analytical tools for understanding, explaining, and predicting media development, control, and practices. The theories and concepts also provide ways to make meaning out of everyday interactions with media technologies and cultures.

COM 211S Serv Lrng:New Media Theory (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 211
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 220 Visual Communication (3)
This course develops students' visual literacy and understanding of visual communication theories and their application. Students learn how to engage in critical analysis of the visual world around them.

COM 220S Visual Communication (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 220
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 250 Digital Video Production (3)
Digital Video Production: a practical hands-on beginning level production course that introduces students to the fundamental principles of shooting video for narrative and non narrative projects, both in the studio and in the field. Students will learn video, audio, lighting, and camera operation.

COM 250S Serv Lrng:Digital Video Production (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 250
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 251 Digital Video Post-Production (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and ENG 101
Non Linear Editing: a beginning level production course that engages students in digital editing theory and practice. Students, using Adobe Premiere, apply their consideration of editing styles and theories to the creation of edited projects.

COM 295 Writing for New Media Environments (3) LAS
New Course
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Concentrates on the theory and practice of interactive writing for new media channels. The course examines the fundamental principles of writing interactively for specific audiences. It will also help students cultivate skills in content development using the right technologies for the different media and editing for a world-wide digital audience.

COM 300 Advanced Composition (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101/or Equiv
Crosslisted ENG 300. A course on writing nonfiction. While most of the work is practical, some theoretical considerations are made regarding style and methods of adapting discourse to meet the needs of a variety of audiences. Writing assignments involve descriptive, expository and persuasive writing.

COM 300S Serv Learn:AdvancedCommunication (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 300
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 311 New Media Law and Ethics (3)
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and ENG 101
his course is designed as a series of case studies used to critically reflect on the legal and ethical issues in new media, the Internet, information systems, computers, and digital culture. Concepts such as privacy, intellectual property, free speech and Internet governance have evolved. This course will provide a unique opportunity to examine these areas of inquiry, while engaging with the new and emerging issues and debates from different legal and ethical approaches.

COM 320 Advanced Oral Communication (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 or equivalent; COM 200 recommended
An applied speech communication course that focuses on developing students' public speaking skills, particularly in professional, organizational, civic, and other structured contexts. Students study and apply principles of effective and ethical public speaking, and have opportunities to develop, deliver, and critique different types of oral presentations. They develop their skills in gathering and conveying information, persuading others, and preparing and delivering group presentations.

COM 320S Serv Learn:Oral Communication (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 320
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 321 Public Relations in the Digital Age (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, COM/ENG 101
Public Engagement in a Digital Age introduces students to the virtual public square networking sites. It examines the principles of framing, deliberation, and speechmaking, and public relations in a digital age as critical artifacts in the social media environment. It emphasizes the importance of social media tools in promoting persuasive speechmaking and public relations presentations through the art of framing in the virtual public for organizations especially non-profits. Topics covered include the definitions of public engagement, public relations and the significance of persuasion, message framing, media relations, planning special events, building community relations through social media, and the process of gaining top management support for public engagement programs.

COM 321S Serv Lrng:Public Relations in the Digital Age (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 321
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 330 Rhetorical Foundations of Human Communication (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, COM/ENG101 or equivalents; COM 200 + 320 recommended
This course is an introduction to major theories and perspectives in the rhetorical tradition, from the classical era to the contemporary period, with emphasis on recurring philosophical and ethical controversies surrounding the nature and role of rhetoric. A central theme is the tension between the promise of rhetoric for constructing a rich, just, and meaningful civic life and the dangers of its use as a tool for manipulation, oppression, and demagoguery.

COM 330S Serv Lrng:Rhetorical Found of Human Communication (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 330
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 340 Intercultural & World Comm (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 + COM/ENG101 or equivalents; COM 200 + 320 recommended
This course explores and examines communication within various cultures; the ways in which communication constructs cultures; and the role of communication in creating and/or reducing cultural biases. The course further helps students explore the relationship between communication and cultural identity, experience, and meaning within and across a variety of cultures, including national cultures, ethnic groups, racial groups, economic classes, genders, and others.

COM 350 Special Topics in Communication: (3) LAS
Courses are offered under this number depending upon the need and interest. Independent study program, guided readings and individual projects may also be included under Specialized Topics.

COM 350S Serv Lrng:Special Topics in Communication (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 350
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 353 Health Communication (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, COM/ENG 101
This course explores, from a humanistic, narrative perspective, the impact of communication on health and conceptions of health in various contexts. Emphasis is on exploring the relationship between narratives/stories/representations of health and personal and cultural conceptions and experiences of health. Topics include doctor-patient communication, differing cultural conceptions of health and illness, family communication surrounding health, issues related to managed care (e.g., HMOs), public health campaigns, the impact of media messages on health, ethical issues, patient empowerment, and communication surrounding pregnancy and birth, infertility, chronic illness, disability, sex education, risk-taking behaviors, mental illness, aging, and death and dying.

COM 353S Serv Lrng:Health Communication (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 353
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 356 Social Media Marketing and Advocacy (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, ENG 101
This course examines the methods, approaches, and strategies of marketing and advocacy through the use of social media; and explores the opportunities and limitations of social media for interactive marketing and advocacy. Students will utilize multiple forms of social media, including multi-channel (e.g., Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, etc.) and multimodal forms of communication (video, graphics, audio, and text). The course prepares students to research, plan, create, implement, analyze, and evaluate social media communication strategies applied in multinational marketing, marketing research, consumer behavior, and retail sales promotion; and to support advocacy, activism, and democratic participation.

COM 357 Human Rights in Digital Age (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, COM/ENG 101
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), negotiated and affirmed by governments of the United Nations, stand as a firm commitment to uphold and protect fundamental human rights, the dignity and worth of each person and the equal rights of men and women. Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) present tremendous opportunities to enable individuals, communities and peoples to achieve their full potential in promoting their sustainable development and improving their quality of life. This course explores each section of the UDHR as applied to the Internet, to examine how the Internet can evolve in a way that further expands and supports these rights.

COM 359 American Film Authors (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and COM/ENG 101/or Equiv
Crosslisted ENG 359. An in-depth study of major American feature film directors. The styles and major traits of directors will be stressed through close examination of representative films. The course also addresses filmmaking as a collaborative art, examining the role of stars, writers, producers, and studios. Films and filmmakers will be placed within historical, sociological, and cultural contexts.

COM 359S Serv Lrng:American Film Authors (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 359
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 380 Newswriting I (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course in newswriting introduces students to literary forms common in today's news media and to basic interviewing and reporting techniques, and to ethical issues in journalism.

COM 380S Serv Learn:Newswriting I (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 380
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 388 Feature Writing (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course stresses the craft of newspaper and magazine feature writing, with attention to leads, structure and polished prose, and ethics.

COM 388S Serv Learn:Feature Writing (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 388
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 390 Drama Workshop (3) LAS
An introduction to play production, this course considers some of the principles of acting, directing and staging. Participants produce scenes and short plays in a laboratory theater.

COM 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A communication-related work experience supervised by department faculty coordinators in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation is on pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated up to six credit hours. COM 400, Internship may be substituted for the co-op work experience.

COM 400 Internship (1-3)
Internships provide the student with the opportunity to gain practical experience in an appropriate segment of the communications industry. While there is some variation, typically the student will spend approximately 135 hours in a work environment. Enrollment is limited to majors in communication studies. Registration by permission of the department only. Co-op work experience may be substituted for the internship.

COM 410 Research Methods (3)
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, ENG 101
Research Methods will introduce students to qualitative, quantitative and critical research techniques as they have been applied to media and communication practice and theory. The course will introduce you to research foundational principles as well as methods of textual analysis, qualitative research methods, quantitative research methods, and audience analysis. The course will focus on specific approaches and issues with reading, conducting, and reporting research, the use of multiple data collection methods, and basic quantitative and qualitative data analysis.

COM 410S Serv Lrng:Research Methods (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 410
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A full-time communications related work experience supervised by department faculty coordinators in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation is on pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated up to six credit hours. COM 400, Internship may be substituted for the co-op work experience.

COM 498 Senior Thesis:New Media Campaign and Blogfolio Design (3)
Prerequisite(s): Students must have at least 75 hours of completed course work
Digital Portfolio: In the first half of the semester, participants will take an in-depth look at the power of digital portfolios as a tool to document student learning through exploring various formats and uses of digital portfolios. Students will implement a digital portfolio as part of their Capstone Project (along with the New Media Campaign), and create individual digital portfolios using a blend of audio, video, text, and images to introduce themselves. In the second half of the semester students will research, plan, create, and present a social media campaign for social change. This campaign will involve working closely with a community partner utilizing several forms of media to launch, manage, and measure the impact of a multimedia, multimodal public service campaign. Students will present their campaigns to the Mount St. Joseph Community.

COM 498S Serv Lrng:Senior Thesis:New Media Campaign and Blogfolio Design (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): COM 498
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

COM 499 Communication Studies Capstone (1) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours of Core curriculum completed
Individual application of communication theory and methods to a special problem in a manner that demonstrates integration of concepts and methods of the liberal arts and sciences and those of the major. Permission of department required.

CORE 115 Common Ground (3) COR
In this course students examine their own role as citizens, and explore historical and current ideas about the common good. Emphasis is placed on the importance of self-knowledge, understanding others and their cultures, and discernment of one's voice in promoting the common good.

CORE 115H HON:Common Ground (3) COR
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honors Program, Approval of the Honors Program director
Course description as stated in CORE 115 (Honors Course)

CORE 115S Serv Lrng:Common Ground (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 115 or CORE 115H
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CORE 405 The Human Costs of Inequality (3) CCP
Prerequisite(s): 40 Hours in the Core and 90 Hours Total
Capstone is a culminating interdisciplinary course with a three-fold purpose: (1) to facilitate substantial new learning about a complex global problem; (2) to encourage integration of knowledge, skills, and values from the entire liberal arts and sciences Core Curriculum, including experiential learning, to address that problem; and (3) to strengthen concern and action for the common good as habits of mind. This course examines The Human Costs of Inequality, including economic and other forms of inequality in the US and across the globe, the impact of inequality on human health/well-being, productivity, mobility, and other measures, and how a focus on the Common Good can and should inspire us to minimize human suffering.

CORE 405S Serv Lrng:The Human Costs of Inequality (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 405
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CORE 410 Core Capstone: International LGBTQ+ Rights (3) CCP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hrs. within the Core Curriculum; 90 hrs. total
The Capstone is a culminating interdisciplinary course with a three-fold purpose: (1) to facilitate substantial new learning about a complex global problem; (2) to encourage integration of knowledge, skills, and values from the entire liberal arts and sciences Core Curriculum, including experiential learning, to address that problem; and (3) to strengthen concern and action for the common good as habits of mind. Through their work in this course, students will discover some of the history of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender rights in the United States and several other developed and developing nations. Students will examine and evaluate some of the legal, cultural, medical, and economic forces and perspectives that prohibit or restrict LGBTQ+ people's rights and will examine the tensions that still exist in many countries, including the US, over inclusion of LGBTQ+ people in civil society.

CORE 410S Serv Lrng: Core Capstone: International LGBTQ+ Rights (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 410
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CORE 425 Global Human Rights: The Case for Women & Child (3) CCP
Prerequisite(s): 40 Hours in the CORE 90 Hours Total
This capstone course will examine the idea of the individual human right and how this idea has evolved to address the different needs of women and children throughout the world.

CORE 425S Serv Lrng:Global Human Rights: The Case for Women & Child (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 425
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CORE 426 Capital Punishment:Exploring the Death Penalty (3) CCP
Core Capstone is a culminating interdisciplinary course with a three-fold purpose: (1) to facilitate substantial new learning about a complex global problem; (2) to encourage integration of knowledge, skills, and values from the entire liberal arts and sciences Core Curriculum, including experiential learning, to address that problem; and (3) to strengthen concern and action for the common good as habits of mind. This course examines capital punishment in the United States through the lens of the common good. In doing so, a variety of social inequities and injustices are discussed. Students will focus on the historical, philosophical, and socio-cultural elements of the death penalty.

CORE 426S Serv Lrng: Capital Punishment: Exploring the Death Penalty (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 426
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CORE 430 Agriculture, Agribusiness, and the Ecology of Food (3) CCP
Prerequisite(s): 40 Hours in the CORE and 90 Hours Total
Core Capstone is a culminating interdisciplinary course with a three-fold purpose: (1) to facilitate substantial new learning about a complex global problem; (2) to encourage integration of knowledge, skills, and values from the entire liberal arts and sciences Core Curriculum, including experiential learning, to address that problem; and (3) to strengthen concern and action for the common good as habits of mind. CORE 430 is an inquiry into the ecology, business and ethics of worldwide food production and distribution. The course will begin with an overview of agricultural history, beginning with the agricultural revolution, continuing through agricultural history up until the so-called "Green Revolution" of the 1950s and '60s. We will continue with the study of modern agribusiness and the ethics, economics and ecology of current industrial food production processes, including Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs), the issues surrounding pesticides, antibiotics, herbicides and other chemicals upon which industrial agriculture depends, issues surrounding crop diversity, the ecology of monocultures, and the promise and peril of genetically modified organisms (GMOs)in food production. We will end with a study of alternative approaches to food production including "locavore" movements, urban agriculture, and alternative or traditional approaches to the growing of food.

CORE 430S Serv Lrng: Agriculture, Agribusiness, and the Ecology of Food (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 430
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CORE 455 Human Rights in the Digital Age (3) CCP
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), negotiated and affirmed by governments of the United Nations, stand as a firm commitment to uphold and protect fundamental human rights, the dignity and worth of each person, and the equal rights of men and women. Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) present immeasurable opportunities to enable individuals, communities and peoples to achieve their full potential in promoting sustainable development and improving quality of life. This course explores relevant sections of the UDHR as applied to the Internet, to examine how the Internet can evolve in a way that further expands and supports these rights. Topics may include: issues of Internet access and use, Information and Computer Technology for Development (ICT4D), copyright and right to educational materials, privacy rights, online defamation, freedom of expression and censorship, right to assembly and right to liberty and security on the Internet.

CORE 471 Going Places:Transportation, Oil and Cities (3) CCP
Prerequisite(s): 40 Hours in the Core and 90 Hours Total
Core Capstone is a culminating interdisciplinary course with a three-fold purpose: (1) to facilitate substantial new learning about a complex global problem; (2) to encourage integration of knowledge, skills, and values from the entire liberal arts and sciences Core Curriculum, including experiential learning, to address that problem; and (3) to strengthen concern and action for the common good as habits of mind. This course examines our current transportation habits and their consequences on the environment and the shapes of our communities using social, political, scientific, economic and environmental perspectives. These considerations are used to evaluate present and future solutions to transportation-related problems such as worldwide oil supply and demand, air and water quality, and patterns of land use.

CORE 471H HON:Going Places:Transportation, Oil and Cities (0) CCP
Prerequisite(s): 40 Hours in the Core and 90 Hours Total
Course description as stated in CORE 471 (Honors Course)

CORE 472 Immigration:Achievements and Perils at the Core of our Nation (3) CCP
Prerequisite(s): 40 Hours in the CORE and 90 Hours Total
Core Capstone is a culminating interdisciplinary course with a three-fold purpose: (1) to facilitate substantial new learning about a complex global problem; (2) to encourage integration of knowledge, skills, and values from the entire liberal arts and sciences Core Curriculum, including experiential learning, to address that problem; and (3) to strengthen concern and action for the common good as habits of mind. This course will examine US immigration from a personal, historical, political, socio-economical, and psychological perspective.

CORE 472H HON:Immigration:Achievements and Perils at the Core of Nation (0) CCP
Course description as stated in CORE 472 (Honors Course)

CORE 472S Serv Lrng:Immigration: Achievements and Perils at the Core of our Nation (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 472
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CORE 473 Understanding Poverty (3) CCP
Prerequisite(s): 40 Hours in the CORE and 90 Hours Total
Core Capstone is a culminating interdisciplinary course with a three-fold purpose: (1) to facilitate substantial new learning about a complex global problem; (2) to encourage integration of knowledge, skills, and values from the entire liberal arts and sciences Core Curriculum, including experiential learning, to address that problem; and (3) to strengthen concern and action for the common good as habits of mind. This course will help students understand the phenomenon of poverty by exploring its many aspects: its reality, manifestations, and scope today, in the U.S. and the world; how/why it occurs and is sustained; its broad impacts on life and health; and what is being done or might be done to impact it (on the policy level as well as by organizations, agencies, and citizens).

CORE 473H HON:Understanding Poverty (0) CCP
Course description as stated in CORE 473 (Honors Course)

CORE 473S Serv Lrng:Understanding Poverty (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CORE 473
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 103 Foundations of Criminal Justice (3) LAS
This course covers the spectrum of criminal justice in America. It offers an examination of the criminal justice system by addressing issues of law, deviance, and justice. Students will explore how justice is achieved through law, punishment, and criminal justice agencies and evaluate the nature, scope, sources, purposes, and practical limitations of the criminal justice system. Students will appreciate the complexities of criminal justice laws, policies, and programs and their impact on criminal justice practitioners and active citizens.

CRM 103H HON:Foundations of Criminal Justice (0) LAS
Course description as stated in CRM 103 (Honors Course)

CRM 104 Introduction to Criminalistics (3) LAS
This course provides a foundational overview of criminalistics. Students will be exposed to the basic crime scene investigation (e.g., assessment, processing) and will explore a wide array of physical and trace evidence concepts (e.g., fingerprints, bloodstains, hairs and fibers, firearms, tool marks) and identification techniques. Students will also be introduced to a variety of disciplines within the criminalistics field.

CRM 105 Elements of Inquiry (3)
The overarching goal of this course is to help students learn to write in a manner consistent with the standards of the field. As such, this course is designed to assist students with criminal justice database technology and with writing and research skills specific to the field of criminal justice. For instance, students will learn how to: proficiently use library databases to locate empirical journal articles, critically evaluate information resources and content, and properly cite references. Toward the end of the course, students will gain practical skills to help locate a job in the criminal justice field.

CRM 204 Bullies & Bullets:Victimization in Schools (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103 or CRM 103
This course explores different forms of crime and victimization in primary and secondary institutions as well as in institutions of higher education. Attention will be given to students' fear of crime, violent and sexual victimizations, drug and alcohol use, bullying and cyberbullying, and school shootings. Exploration of these topics will emphasize how to prevent and reduce these forms of crime and victimization.

CRM 205 Forensic Science Integrated Seminar (2)
Corequisite(s): FOR 210 or CRM 103 or Permission of Instructor
Students will examine the interactions of forensic science and law enforcement, and research forensic science career options and the necessary preparations for them. Interdisciplinary topics to be explored include cold case resolution, forensic science in the courtroom, missing and unidentified persons cases, and forensic science in mass disaster settings. This course is primarily intended for students seeking the Forensic Science Minor; however, it is open to all.

CRM 206 Crime & Constitution (3) LAS
New Course
Crosslisted LGS 206. This course will examine various aspects of crime and criminal procedure that arise from the United States Constitution. Topics covered include search and seizure, due process, indictments, bail, punishments, double jeopardy, self- incrimination, treason, extradition, and the rights to speedy trial by jury, to confront witnesses, and to the effective assistance of counsel.

CRM 207 Animals and Criminal Justice (3) LAS
This course will examine topics such as animal rights animals as victims of violence, the use of service animals, K-9s and their officers, and animals used in corrections or for rehabilitative purposes.

CRM 207S Serv Lrng:Animals and Criminal Justice (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 207
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 208 Serial Murder (3) LAS
New Course
This course examines serial murder, a crime that has gained a considerable amount of mystery and fear in society, as well as with members of the criminal justice system. Attention is given to defining this type of crime as well as to the various types of offenders and patterns of offender behavior.

CRM 210 Drugs and Crime (3) LAS
New Course
This course is set to examine the nexus between drugs and crime. Students in this course will learn about a wide variety of drugs of abuse and their effects. Students will also examine the theoretical aspects of the drug-crime connection and review many of the correlates of this relationship. Students will also learn to evaluate both the practical and policy implications of the drug-crime problem.

CRM 217 Cops, Bobbies & Thief-Takers (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course discusses and surveys: the role of police as formal social control agents in a stratified society; the history of policing; policing as an occupation; the impact of social change on police work; social characteristics of police; styles of policing; police misconduct; and explanations of police behavior.

CRM 218 Victimology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course provides an overview of the emerging field of victimology. The course will focus on the following topics: the scope of victimization, theories of victimology, societal response to victims, role of victims in the criminal justice system, resources available to victims, and the various effects that victimization can have on the victim and on his/her relationships with others.

CRM 218H HON:Victimology (0) LAS
Course description as stated in CRM 218 (Honors Course)

CRM 218S Serv Lrng:Victimology (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 218
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 220 Courts in America (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
The focus of this course is on the American courts system. More specifically, this course will examine the law and its social and political origins, as well as the function, structure, and process of the courts. A thorough examination of the main actors of the courtroom workgroup (i.e., prosecutor, defense attorney, and judge) and jury will be covered. This course will also provide a comprehensive examination of the pretrial and trial processes and procedures, beginning with the arrest and booking of offenders and culminating with their sentencing and appeals. In addition, students will examine juvenile, drug, and diversion courts, as well as critically assess issues related to the media and courts.

CRM 223 Guns,Crime and American Society (3)
New Course
This course intends to help students understand the current debate on gun rights vs. gun control that animates our society. The main purpose of this course is to explore the role guns play in contemporary America from a scholarly perspective (i.e., objectively, based on actual research). This course is set to cover all aspects of guns in society, and as such will explore this topic from a sociological perspective. Tentative subjects of discussion will include, among others, historical and technological aspects of firearms; the 2nd Amendment (history, origins, interpretations); guns by the numbers (prevalence, distribution); gun ownership (attitudes, opinions); gun use (lawful possession, concealed carry, personal defense); gun markets (legal and illegal); gun crimes and injuries (prevalence, responses); and guns in an international perspective.

CRM 225 Sex Crimes (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course examines deviant and criminal sexual behaviors and practices, as well as the social and criminal justice responses. Students will develop informed analysis of sexual offenses, sexual offenders, and public perceptions of and criminal justice responses to sexually deviant behavior.

CRM 225S Serv Lrng: Sex Crimes (1) EXP
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 230 Crime Prevention (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course is designed to provide an exploration of various methods of community crime prevention (prevention outside the traditional confines of the criminal justice system). Relevant theory and research related to neighborhood crime prevention efforts, community policing, school crime prevention, and other situational and environmental prevention measures will be explored critically. As such, this course aims to provide a foundation for a better understanding of the objectives of various crime prevention efforts, as well as the proven effectiveness of these various strategies.

CRM 230S Serv Lrng:Crime Prevention (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 230
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 235 Crimes of Technology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course examines the intersection of technology and crime. Students will explore the manner in which technology has changed the nature of crime and the ways in which technology has affected efforts to control such crimes.

CRM 240 Crime & Media (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course examines the connections between crime and various types of popular media. Students will explore the manner in which forms of media influence criminality, as well as the effects of media portrayals of crime and crime control on the criminal justice system and society. Attention will also be given to the social construction of crimes and criminal justice events, the effect that violent media has on social aggression, and media portraits of criminal justice professionals.

CRM 245 Terrorism (3) LAS
New Course
This course will examine the phenomenon of terrorism. Topics to be discussed include: defining terrorism, causes and motivations behind terrorism, various typologies of terrorism, and the response to terrorism.

CRM 292 Forensic Psychology (3) LAS
New Course
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103
Crosslisted PSY 292. Persons with mental illness often come in contact with the legal system, and this course addresses major areas of that confluence from the perspective of a forensic psychologist. Topics include competency, sanity at the time of the offense, involuntary hospitalization, civil litigation, child custody psychological evaluations, psychopathy as it relates to criminal behavior, and the challenges associated with being an expert witness.

CRM 293 Juvenile Delinquency (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
The purpose of this course is to help students understand the nature, extent, and course of juvenile delinquency and methods devised by society for controlling anti-social behavior committed by young people.

CRM 293S Serv Lrng:Juvenile Delinquency (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 293
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 295 Corrections (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course provides a thorough examination of the main components of the American corrections system and evaluates the philosophical underpinnings of punishment and penality. Students will explore social forces that shape correctional policy and the subsequent effect of such policies upon those confined and their consequences for society. This course is intended to challenge common views and myths of the correctional system.

CRM 295S Serv Lrng:Corrections (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 295
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 298 Community Justice (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course examines the community justice movement and how it impacts the criminal justice system. Students will examine case studies of efforts to involve the community in the criminal justice system.

CRM 300 Critical Issues in Criminology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, additional 6 CRM hours at 200 level or Instructor/Advisor Approval
This course approaches crime and criminality through a survey of issues. Attention is given to key critical issues and policies in the three parts of the criminal justice system. Criminological theory, contemporary research, and current events will inform discussion and debate of these issues throughout the course.

CRM 300H HON:Critical Issues in Criminology (0) LAS
Course description as stated in CRM 300 (Honors Course)

CRM 300S Serv Lrng:Critical Issues in Criminology (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 300
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 306 White Collar Crime (3)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course provides comprehensive overview of white-collar and occupational crimes, as well as the long-term effects such activities have on our society. A variety of white-collar offenses will be covered in this course, including but not limited to: unsafe products; environmental crimes; institutional corruption; securities, corporate and fiduciary fraud; corruption of public officials; medical crime; and computer crime. At the same time, students will engage in a discussion of their causes, the legislation aimed at curtailing such crimes, and possible forms of intervention and enforcement. High-profile cases, as well as the latest trends in white-collar criminal activity will also be discussed.

CRM 307 Fraud Examination (3)
New Course
This course will cover the major methods employees use to commit occupational fraud. Students will learn how and why occupational fraud is committed, how to assess where an organization is at the greatest risk for fraud, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved.

CRM 350T Crim Law & Procedure for LGS (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151
Crosslisted LGS 350T. This course will address the basics of criminal law and criminal procedure as it relate to paralegal practice.

CRM 361 Professionalism and Decisionmaking in Criminal Justice (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, Additional 6 CRM hours at 200 Level.
This course focuses on the examination of selected principles and ethical issues related to law enforcement, courts, and corrections. This course is specifically designed to provide students with an overview of ethical dilemmas relevant to the criminal justice professions and offer suggestions on how these ethical dilemmas might be resolved. Throughout this course, students will have opportunities to cultivate a greater understanding of their own philosophical perspectives that should serve as a foundation for making more informed ethical decisions as they further their criminal justice education and become criminal justice professionals.

CRM 370 Criminological Theory (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, CRM 105, additional 9 CRM hours at 200 level or Advisor Approval
This course reviews the basic concepts and principles of criminological theories and evaluates the adequacy of criminological theories as explanations of crime and deviant behavior. Students will also explore the connection between criminological theory and social policy.

CRM 370H HON:Criminological Theory (0) LAS
Course description as stated in CRM 370 (Honors Course)

CRM 370S Serv Lrng: Criminological Theory (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 370
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 372 Comparative Criminal Justice/Criminology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, additional 6 CRM hours at 200 level or Instructor/Advisor Approval
This course focuses on the examination of crime and justice issues from a cross-national vantage point. It is specifically designed to provide students with a better understanding of comparative and international issues relevant to the criminology and criminal justice professions. Throughout this course, students will have opportunities to cultivate a greater knowledge and understanding of the American criminal justice system, and examine how its various components compare to those of other countries around the world. Global issues, such as terrorism, transnational organized crime, and human trafficking will also be reviewed and analyzed. This course will give students the knowledge needed to interact with justice system agents in other countries, and suggest ways to improve our own domestic system of justice.

CRM 375 Criminology Research (3)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, CRM 105, additional 9 CRM hours at 200 level, additional 3 CRM hours at 300 level
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the logic of social research methods and the scientific method of inquiry. In doing so, this course will cover topics such as experimental design, survey research, methods of evaluation research, sampling, and the contrast between quantitative and qualitative research.

CRM 375S Serv Lrng:Criminology Research (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 375
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

CRM 380 Independent Study (1-3)
Student-initiated project intended to add a new dimension of education and encourage intellectual activity, initiative and sustained effort. Topics to be chosen in consultation with an instructor who has special competence in the subject involved. Open to junior and senior majors. Approval of instructor required.

CRM 392 Managing Criminal Justice Organizations (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, additional 6 CRM hours at 200 level or Instructor/Advisor Approval
This course focuses on the administration and management of criminal justice professionals (i.e., individuals in law enforcement, courts, and corrections). In doing so, we will explore issues facing employees, interpersonal relations, and group dynamics. Students will also examine the operations of entire criminal justice organizations, current management principles, and various administrative processes. These concepts will be assessed through relevant organizational theory, empirical research, and famous case studies.

CRM 395 Criminal Investigation (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, CRM 217, additional 3 CRM hours at 200 level
This course explores the principles and practices underlying the criminal investigation process. The course will draw upon both the theory of investigations and the current body of research to assess the effectiveness, equity, and efficiency of current investigative practices.

CRM 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience:Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

CRM 397 Social Deviance (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, additional 6 CRM hours at 200 level or Instructor/Advisor Approval
This course examines the concept of social deviance and the manner in which society defines and responds to deviance. Also discussed are the various forms of social control used to control deviant behavior, beliefs, and conditions of persons in society.

CRM 400 Senior Thesis (3)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 217, CRM 218, CRM 220, CRM 295, CRM 300, CRM 370, CRM 375 and Senior Standing
Criminology majors are required to complete a senior thesis research project. The thesis must be a substantive piece of scholarship involving primary or secondary research that serves to synthesize knowledge acquired over the course of the students' undergraduate career. Thesis projects are designed to demonstrate critical-thinking skills and students' knowledge of criminology and the criminal justice system. Students must apply concepts and theories, collect, analyze, and interpret data, and develop relevant policy implications.

CRM 407 Law & Society (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, additional 6 CRM hours at 200 level 3 hours at 300 level or Instructor/Advisor Approval
Crosslisted SOC 407. This course studies the relationship between law and society through the lens of social identity. Through core law & society concepts, students will gain a cross-cultural understanding of how law produces a socially acceptable identity, how we mobilize law in a number of ways to either conform to or resist law, and the implications law has for concepts of race, class, gender, and culture.

CRM 408 Biosocial Criminology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, additional 6 CRM hours at 200 level 3 hours at 300 level or Instructor/Advisor Approval
This course will introduce students to biosocial criminology, an emerging interdisciplinary subfield in the criminological discipline. This subfield strives to understand the association between genes, biology, the brain, the environment and antisocial behavior. Students will consider questions as to whether there are "natural-born killers", what makes a successful psychopath, and is it morally wrong for us to punish those who are biologically-wired for a life of crime. Students will explore new biosocial treatments for violence and analyze controversial theories of biosocial crime prevention.

CRM 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience:Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

CRM333 SLU Violent Crime (3)
Course Description as Submitted by St. Leo University: This course is a comprehensive overview of the problems and types of violent crime occurring in the United States. Course analysis includes youth gang violence, serial homicide, mass murder, domestic violence and sexual battery in contemporary society. The nature and extent of these deviant acts along with official reports and surveys that provide measurement techniques of violent crime will be detailed. Included will be coverage of law enforcement, prosecution and correctional efforts aimed at curtailing violent crime.

ECE 230 Observing and Understanding the Whole Child (3)
Teacher candidates will study typical and atypical development in children from birth to age 8. Major developmental theories, conditions and risk factors that affect children's development and learning will be examined in-depth. To develop observational skills, students will become acquainted with, and utilize, formal and informal assessment instruments and tools.

ECE 250 Profess & Developmentally Appropriate Practices (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECE 230
Teacher candidates will learn about professional and developmentally appropriate education for ages birth to 8 years. Learners will identify various standard-based activities and assessment strategies, articulating their relationship to promoting children's development and learning. The students will engage in aspects of program design, explaining necessary accommodations for all learners in a diverse and inclusive manner, with considerations that foster psychomotor, cognitive, affective and socio-cultural well-being.

ECE 321 Collab Practices in Working with Families, Communities & Peers (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School
This course acquaints the student with the theories, knowledge, and skills necessary to work in a collaborative manner with parents, teaching peers, support staff, school administrators, and individuals from outside agencies on behalf of young children. Students will explore strategies for building relations and collaborative interventions within diverse contexts.

ECE 321S Serv Lrng:Collab Practices in Working with Families, Communities & Peers (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ECE 321
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ECE 333 Early Childhood Practicum (1)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School, EDU 207
Concurrent requisite(s): ECE 339
This practicum provides students with practical and pedagogical applications of the concepts and skills found within the disciplines of mathematics and natural sciences. Each MSJ undergraduate student will participate for at least 50 hours, under supervision, as a pre-service instructor within the early childhood classroom setting.

ECE 334 Collaborative Practices in Early Childhood Education (1)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and PSY 205 or EDU 207
Concurrent requisite(s): ECE 341
This practicum provides students with practical applications of the evidence-based concepts and skills from the disciplines of the behavioral and social sciences. Each MSJ undergraduate student will participate for at least 50 hours, under supervision, as a team member within the classroom, school, and community settings.

ECE 336 Methods of Teaching Math I (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to The School of Education, grade of C or better in MTH 170 or equivalent
This course examines the mathematical content, methods, and strategies for effective instruction within the context of early childhood and special education environments. Emphasis is on multiple approaches, problem solving and communication of mathematics. The use of manipulatives and technology will be stressed. The course focuses on the following domains of The Common Core State Standards: Counting & Cardinality, Operations & Algebraic Thinking, Number & Operations in Base Ten, and Number & Operations-Fractions. These are examined through the lenses of Mindsets, responsive teaching, and explicit instruction.

ECE 337 Methods of Teaching Math II (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to The School of Education, grade of C or better in MTH 170 or equivalent
This course examines the mathematical content, methods, and strategies for effective instruction within the context of early childhood and special education environments. Emphasis is on multiple approaches, problem solving and communication of mathematics. The use of manipulatives and technology will be stressed. The course focuses on the following domains of The Common Core State Standards: Measurement & Data, Geometry, Ratios & Proportional Relationships, The Number System, Expressions & Equations, Functions, Statistics & Probability. These are examined through the lenses of responsive teaching, and explicit instruction.

ECE 338 Methods Teaching Social Studies (3)
Prerequisite(s): HIS course with grade of "C" or better and Admission to School, ECE 250
Concurrent requisite(s): ECE 334
This course is designed to prepare students to use best practices and procedures in the teaching of social studies in pre-school through 3rd grade. It addresses Ohio's content standards for social studies in early childhood education.

ECE 339 Methods of Teaching Science (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and one LAB science with a grade of "C" or better
This course is a survey of the content and concepts of the early childhood science curriculum which includes a study of methods and materials and a review of relevant research. Teacher candidates will gain practical, hands-on practice in teaching science at the early childhood level, and developmentally appropriate practice (DAP) in science curriculum.

ECE 341 Methods of Teaching Social Studies and the Sciences (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECE 250, Department Admission, one history course with a grade of "C" or better, and one lab science with a grade of 'C' or better
Corequisite(s): ECE 334
The course is designed to prepare students to use best practices and procedures in the teaching of the social studies and the sciences in pre-school through 3rd grade. It addresses Ohio's content standards for social studies and science in early childhood education, Learning to be an effective social studies and science teacher comes with practice, experience, and a willingness to experiment with new approaches. Because early childhood and elementary teachers must be generalists more than specialists, they must be able to address a wide range of students' academic and social needs. An essential element is a willingness to engage in inquiry and exploration and to model problem-posing and problem-solving along with your students. These are the skills that we will be practicing throughout this course.

ECE 444 Student Teaching and Seminar for Early Childhood Education (12)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and permission from Clinical Experience Director and EDU 207
The student will experience fifteen weeks of supervised teaching in Early Childhood setting approved by the Ohio Department of Education. The student teacher will plan and implement a variety of learning experiences for young children grades pre-K through 3rd, gradually taking responsibility for the entire program. The student teacher will be evaluated by the cooperative teacher, university supervisor and key faculty.

ECO 201 Economic Issues (3) S
Introduction to current critical problems facing society and their economic interpretation and solution. Topics include crime, government regulation, health care, poverty, population growth, energy, pollution, social security, and income maintenance. Recommended for non-business majors.

ECO 211 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) S
This course concentrates on macroeconomics theory; a study of the economic system as a whole. Topics include employment, inflation, financial institutions, monetary, and budget policy.

ECO 212 Principles of Microeconomics (3) S/CEP
This course concentrates on microeconomic theory; a study of individual markets. Topics include the economics of the firm and the household, consumer behavior, labor, energy, and government regulation.

ECO 301 Financial Economics (3)
Prerequisite(s): FIN 300
This course provides a rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of financial economics and their applications in security analysis and investment management. Different from a corporate finance course, this course focuses more on financial instruments analysis and financial markets. Representative topics include financial institutions, measure of risk, capital asset pricing model (CAPM), arbitrage pricing theory (APT), efficient market hypothesis (EMH), discount cash flow model (DCF), term structure of interest rates, binominal valuation of options and the Black-Sholes formula.

ECO 305 Sports Economics (3) S
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211, ECO 212
This course examines the decisions of sports fans, players, owners and leagues from a microeconomic perspective. Topics include revenues and profits; pricing strategies; monopoly and antitrust issues; competitive balance, free agency and salary caps; labor relations in professional sports; the regional economic impact of professional and college sports; game theory and tournament theory; discrimination in sports; and the business of college sports.

ECO 311 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211, ECO 212
This course focuses on the behavior of the economy as a whole, such as booms and recessions, the economy's total output of goods and services and the growth of output, the rate of inflation and unemployment, the balance of payments, and exchange rates. It also focuses on the economic behavior and policies that affect consumption and investment, the dollar and the trade balance, the determinants of changes in wages and prices, monetary and fiscal policy, interest rates, and the national debt.

ECO 312 Intermediate Microeconomics (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211, ECO 212
Microeconomics focuses on the motivations and decisions of economic entities in a market context. In this course, learners will develop and use economic tools to analyze economic decision making of individuals, households and firms.

ECO 350 International Economics (3) S
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211, ECO 212
Discusses issues in the areas of free trade vs. protectionism, balance of payments and international trade and finance.

ECO 360 Money and Banking (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211, ECO 212
Crosslisted FIN 360. Money, financial markets, and financial institutions are described and analyzed with economic tools such as supply and demand. The role of a central bank will be discussed along with the international financial system. Different monetary and fiscal policies will also be analyzed.

ECO 395 Finance and Economics in the Sport Industry (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): ACC 213, ACC 214, CIS 135, EC0 211, MKT 300
Corequisite(s): SPM 330
This course discusses contemporary examples from marketing, sponsorship, facility construction, and sport law to illustrate the crucial role that money, budget, and finance plays in the finance and economics of the sport business. The economics of sport teams, championships, and merchandising will also be discussed.

ECO 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

ECO 450 International Economics and Finance (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211, FIN 300
A study of the macroeconomic and monetary aspects of international economics, with attention to basis for trade between nations, balance of payments, exchange rate determination, international monetary systems and macroeconomic adjustment, and monetary, fiscal, and exchange rate policies in an open economy.

ECO 453 Current Topics in Economics (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211 and ECO 212
Covers selected topics in business. May be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

ECO 490 Seminar in Economics (1-3) S
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211 and ECO 212 and permission of instructor
This course covers selected economic topics in-depth. This may be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

ECO 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

ECO 499 Independent Study (3) S

EDU 143 Problem Solving & Number Systems (3)
Prerequisite(s): MTH 097 or MTH 098/Equiv or Placement
This course prepares pre-service MCE/Mathematics Concentration educators according to the Ohio New Learning Standards (ONLS) which are aligned to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. The course will challenge students to develop a deep understanding of the material they will eventually be teaching through mathematical investigations and discussion. The wide range of mathematical concepts covered in this course are centrally focused around developing a deeper understanding of number sense, proportional relationships, and algebraic reasoning. Topics include: Number Systems, Rational and Irrational Numbers, Addition and Subtraction, Multiplication and Division, Properties, Fractions and Decimals, Time and Money, Place Value, Ratio and Proportion, Probability, Statistics, Organizing Data, Expressions, Equations, and Inequalities, Patterns and Functions, and Counting Sequences, with a focus on how these topics would be applied in a classroom. There will be an emphasis on understanding and using the NCTM mathematical processes of problem-solving, reasoning and proof, communication, representation, and connection.

EDU 153 Geometry and Measurement (3)
Prerequisite(s): MTH 097 or MTH 098/Equiv or Placement
This course prepares pre-service MCE/Mathematics Concentration educators according to the Ohio New Learning Standards (ONLS) which are aligned to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. The course will challenge students to develop a deep understanding of the material they will eventually be teaching through mathematical investigations and discussion. The wide range of mathematical concepts covered in this course are centrally focused around developing a deeper understanding of spatial sense, graphical representations, geometric relationships, and measurement. The mathematical concepts covered in this course will be: Graphing, Patterns and Functions, Lines and Angles, Shapes and their Properties, Measurement, Perimeter, Area, Surface Area and Volume with a focus on how these topics would be applied in a classroom. There will be an emphasis on understanding and using the NCTM mathematical processes of problem-solving, reasoning and proof, communication, representation, and connection.

EDU 190 Introduction to the Educational Profession (1)
This exploratory course encourages potential teachers to think about education from the viewpoint of the teacher, both as a profession and as a process. Participants will explore their own educational experiences, observe teaching from a professional point of view, and interact with current teaching professionals. They will also have an overview of the organizational structure and school governance as it pertains to the licensure options in Ohio.

EDU 190S Srv Lrng:Introduction to the Educational Profession (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): EDU 190
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

EDU 207 Educational Theory & Reflective Teaching (3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103
Educators must design learning experiences based on sound research and theory. This course provides an overview of major educational theories and the associated research for understanding student factors, environments, instructional strategies and interactions that promote learning. A focus is on the development of reflective practice which draws upon this knowledge to make and justify effective teaching decisions.

EDU 217 Technology in the Instructional Process (2)
Corequisite(s): EDU 190 - It is highly recommended that EDU 190 and EDU 217 be taken during the same semester
This is an introductory course on the use of technology in K-12 classrooms. Using a combination of lecture and hands-on instruction, it will address issues surrounding the use of instructional technology, including, but not limited to: instructional software; the Internet; PowerPoint and other presentations program; hypermedia; SmartBoards; and technology in the instructional process. One main emphasis of the course will be the development of technology-based projects to be used in the classroom. The course will also address assistive technology and the ethical and responsible use of technology in the classroom. The theoretical underpinnings of instructional technology will also be covered.

EDU 235 Communication Development and Disorders (3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and SED 215/215S
Major theories of language acquisition and development of literacy; the causes of communication deficits and disorders; the developmental process for typically and atypically developing young children; the conditions that affect children's language and literacy development and learning; bilingual education. Case studies of typically and atypically developing children.

EDU 255 Foundation, Policy, and Professional Practice (3)
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing or Higher
The course provides an overview of the major historical, philosophical, political, and sociological forces that have influenced the development of contemporary schooling within a diverse, multicultural society. The impact of collaboration and reflective practice on American education will also be examined. Using policy studies, specific issues affecting professional practice will be addressed.

EDU 305 Educational Assessment (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and EDU 207
A study of standardized, teacher-made and informal assessments and their use in the teacher/learning process. Interpretation of standardized scores includes: percentile rank; stanine scores; and grade equivalent scores. The study of teacher-made assessments will include skills in planning, constructing, scoring and interpreting alternate choice, multiple choice, matching, short answer, and essay tests. Informal assessment methodologies will include performance assessments, direct assessments and portfolio assessments. Students will begin their personal/professional portfolio which will be continued throughout all subsequent courses. Assignments will be adapted to different ages of students' interests and subject areas. A 10-hour field experience is included.

EDU 333A Art Education Practicum (3)
Prerequisite(s): AED 290, AED 390 and Admission to ART Department and Education Department
This course, designed specifically for advanced pre-service art educators, serves as a bridge between the art theory and methodology courses (AED 290/390) with their initial field experiences and Art Student Teaching. Therefore, this course's two practicum placements - one at the elementary level (K-5), one at the secondary level (6-12) - of 50 hours each (total 100 hours) are core components. Students are required to observe and assist their mentor teachers and then to plan and implement a mini-unit plan (3 lessons) at the elementary level and a mini-unit plan (3 lessons) at the secondary level. The course's on-campus seminar meetings provide opportunities for assignments and instructions, distributions of materials, discussion of theory, research and practicum issues, analyses of case studies, consideration of video performances, and preparation of the student's professional portfolio.

EDU 333M Music Education Practicum (2-3)
Prerequisite(s): MUS 343, MUS 344
The field experience is the central component of this course. The student will be assigned to two placements in grades K-12 where he/she will participate in two class periods daily Monday through Friday for 12 weeks with monthly seminars. Teaching activities as designated by the content area methods specialist will be assigned in order to apply theory learned in prior course work.

EDU 355 Methods of Math Educators (3)
Prerequisite(s): AYA 345 or MCE 300 Plus 15 Hours in MTH Concentration Area
Corequisite(s): AYA 333 or AYA 334 or MCE 333
Problem solving strategies, instructional strategies, model curricula, mathematics assessment, use of manipulatives and technology in the classroom, mathematical communication (oral and written), integration with other disciplines, lesson-planning for diverse groups of adolescents and young adults.

EDU 356 Classroom Mgmt & Organization (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School of Education
This course will provide a theoretical framework for understanding student behavior within the context of a systems model for academic and behavioral support. The focus will be on introducing theoretically-driven concepts and best practices of positive behavior support and classroom organization which facilitate student achievement. Strategies to help a beginning teacher create a safe and secure learning environment will be emphasized.

EDU 356H HON:Classroom Mgmt & Organiz (0)
Course description as stated in EDU 356 (Honors Course)

EDU 383 Methods of Teaching Science (3)
Prerequisite(s): AYA 345 or MCE 300 Plus 15 Hours in Science Content Area
Corequisite(s): AYA 333 or AYA 334 or MCE 333
An exploration of methods used in teaching biology/science, chemistry/physical sciences, and earth/space/environmental sciences. Students will plan instruction for a wide range of learner abilities, backgrounds and goals based on learners/prior knowledge and conceptualizations. Laboratory and field based experiences require use of current resources in the field. Students will use appropriate electronic technologies which have application in the learning environment. Safety issues and the ethical use of living materials are emphasized.

EDU 384 Methods of Teach Social Studies (3)
Prerequisite(s): AYA 345 or MCE 300 Plus a minimum of 15 hours in Social Studies Concentration area
Corequisite(s): AYA 333 or 334 or MCE 333
This course is designed to prepare the teacher candidate to teach Social Studies and the Social Sciences to children in the middle and secondary grades. Students will become familiar with the curriculum framework as well as the philosophies behind various teaching approaches as outlined by the NCSS Standards and the Ohio K-12 Content Standards for the Social Studies. The teacher candidate will investigate and practice using various teaching techniques and materials.

EDU 386 Methods of Teach Language Arts (3)
Prerequisite(s): AYA 345 or MCE 300 Plus 15 hours in Language Arts Concentration area
Corequisite(s): AYA 333 or 334 or MCE 333
This course is designed to introduce the teacher candidate to the principles, practices, and guidelines necessary to teach Language Arts to a diverse population of middle level students and secondary level students. The teacher candidate will prepare language arts lessons that ensure success for all learners enabling them to construct a meaningful understanding of language arts concepts. Lessons and language arts curricula projects will be aligned to the ODE content standards and to the learning outcomes for the Ohio Reading and Writing Proficiency Tests. Integration in other content areas will be explored and encouraged.

EDU 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
An education related work experience supervised by School of Education faculty in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of a predetermined learning assignment and evaluation of work performance. The course may be repeated for a maximum total of six credits.

EDU 444A Art Education Student Teaching (12)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and permission from the Clinical Experience Director and EDU 207
Intensive full day experience in teaching and related professional development. Student teaching allows the student to synthesize the theory and practice under the guidance of an experienced master teacher. This all day experience lasts for 15 weeks in two different placements.

EDU 444M Music Education Student Teaching (12)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and permission form Clinical Experience Director and EDU 207
Intensive full day experience in teaching and related professional development. Student teaching allows the student to synthesize the theory and practice under the guidance of an experienced master teacher. This all day experience lasts for 15 weeks in two different placements.

EDU 445 Teacher Candidate Portfolio (0)
The teacher candidate portfolio is a collection of artifacts from coursework and fieldwork which demonstrates knowledge, skill, experience, and professional dispositions. Registration for this course requires a fee which provides undergraduate teacher candidates access to an electronic portfolio format over the course of three semesters (fall, spring, and summer). Undergraduate education majors must enroll in this course once each fall semester, beginning their sophomore year. This is a non-credit course and does not meet as a regular class. Each candidate must document competency in becoming a caring, effective and reflective teacher in diverse contexts. Completion of the portfolio is a graduation and licensure requirement and also may be used for professional and career development.

EDU 495 Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Education Division Dean
Independent study under the guidance of a faculty member to meet stated objectives.

EDU 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
An education related work experience supervised by Education Department faculty in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of a predetermined learning assignment and evaluation of work performance. The course may be repeated for a maximum total of six credits.

EDU 499 Workshops (1-3)
The workshop's content will be announced when the course is offered.

ENG 096 Foundations of Writing (3)
Foundations of Writing prepares new students to make the transition from high school to college writing with intensive writing practice and feedback. It helps them to write more confidently and purposefully and to develop ways to clarify and edit their writing for a college-level audience.

ENG 101 Written Word (3) C
Written Word introduces new college students to academic writing with intensive writing practice and feedback. It guides them in developing strategies for communicating clearly, effectively, ethically, and creatively in a college setting. It emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking. It teaches students to discover and create knowledge by generating questions, investigating issues, and forming their own opinions.

ENG 101H HON:Written Word (3) C
Course description as stated in ENG 101 (Honors Course)

ENG 101S Serv Lrng:Written Word (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 101
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 132 In the Beginning: World Myths of Creation & Origins (3) L/CL
A survey of early old and new world creation narratives and myths contrasted with current viewpoints.

ENG 132H HON:In the Beginning: World Creation Epics (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 132H (Honors Course)

ENG 140 Survey of Women Writers (3) L/CL
A chronological study of women writers of the English-speaking world from the 15th century to the present day with emphasis upon their historical and literary significance.

ENG 142 King Arthur:The Medieval Quest (3) L/CL
This course focuses on the great adventures of medieval heroes with particular emphasis on whether they represent every individual's search for the holy grail, the meaning of life.

ENG 150 Acting Workshop (3) LAS
The Acting Workshop is designed for students who are interested in exploring the acting process by developing their improvisational, scene analysis, character development and auditioning skills. Through an innovative performing experience, students will discover various acting techniques that fuse intellect, imagination, voice, and body. The Acting Workshop will also introduce students to the fundamental rehearsal process, culminating in performances of selected scenes at a final public event. This course is designed not only for students of the theater, but also for students interested in public speaking, trial law, media, and education, as well as a broad range of other careers in which confident, fluent, and expressive communication are essential.

ENG 153 Introduction to Poetry (3) L
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent recommended
A study of the rhetoric of poetry and the chief theories about the interpretation of poetry. Emphasis is on poetry as an art form and a statement.

ENG 160 Apes, Angels & Victorians: A Survey of the Victorian Period (3) L/CL
The nineteenth century in Britain was one of rapid technological, intellectual, social, and cultural change. This course will examine Victorian literature -- fiction, poetry, and essays, along with the visual arts -- and will discuss the trends and movements over the period.

ENG 162 Murder Most Foul:Detectives in 19th Cent British Literature (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course will examine the figure of the detective and the changing nature of crime and detection in nineteenth century literature, with ample historical, sociological, and psychological background.

ENG 162H HON:Murder Most Foul:Detectives 19th Cent. British Literature (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 162 (Honors Course)

ENG 165 Literature, Nature & Environ (3) L
New Course
In this course students will examine works of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction that demonstrate ways literary artists envision and critique the relationship of humankind with the natural world. The emphasis will be on contemporary work influenced by the rise of the environmentalist movement begun in the 1960s, but the context of this recent work will be established through an introductory study of selected essays and poems by the British Romantics and the American Transcendentalists. Topics to be discussed will include ecology, political and social responses to ecological crisis, and ecofeminism.

ENG 171 Sports in Literature (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
A course that explores the significance of sports and athletes as depicted in novels, poems, short stories, essays, and film, as well as their relationship to culture and society.

ENG 173 20 Voices, 20 Countries: World Poetry (3) CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
A course that examines the work of 20 poets internationally and its impact on the world.

ENG 174 Meet Me at the Theatre: Mod & Contemp American Drama (3) L/CL
This course introduces students to classics of the American stage, beginning with O'Neill, Williams and Miller, and ending with contemporary theater. Students will read plays, view movie adaptations, and attend local productions.

ENG 174H HON:Meet Me at the Theatre: Mod & Contemp American Drama (3) L/CL
This course introduces students to classics of the American stage, beginning with O'Neill, Williams and Miller, and ending with contemporary theater. Students will read plays, view movie adaptations, and attend local productions.

ENG 175 Modern Short Fiction (3) L/CL
A study of short stories in world literature.

ENG 176 Modern Novel (3) L/CL
Readings in modern fiction emphasizing leading writers of world literature who express the concerns of modern society.

ENG 203 Great Ideas:Scripting and Performing (3) LAS
New Course
Corequisite(s): ENG 101
This course will be centered around one particularly pertinent societal concept or idea, around which students will collaborate on a play script, to be produced and performed in local school and community center settings. Students will receive instruction in playwriting, acting, set construction and design, and dramaturgy.

ENG 204 Happy Agony:18th and 19th Century British Drama (3) L
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or equivalent plus any one Drama Elective except ENG 350W, ENG 374, or ENG 397
The 18th and 19th centuries saw a major shift in drama as an art form in Britain. As the comedies of the Restoration lost favor, English theatre became more focused on tragedies and operas and music hall extravaganzas, while the theatre of the Victorian period involved longer runs (due to the increase in leisure time after industrialization and to the ease of transportation both outside and within cities) and became denser and more political, as in the works of writers such as Wilde, Ibsen and Bernard Shaw. The goal of this course is to acquaint students with major works from these two centuries, focusing in particular on the changing nature of the British audience and on how the theatre reflected political and social change.

ENG 206 State of the Unions:20th Century British and American Drama (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
The course, 20th Century World Drama, will explore a variety of plays, dramatic monologues, and performance art that encompasses an international perspective. The course will examine ways in which these dramas and artistic visions have shaped or influenced their respective cultures and society.

ENG 206H HON:State of the Unions:20th Century British and American Drama (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 206 (Honors Course)

ENG 207 Teenage Wasteland:The Literature of Adolescence (3) CL
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Examines the adolescent character in contemporary fiction as a reflection of the critically important period of personal development it has come to be in American culture, but also as a rich metaphor in literature, that helps readers examine a state of contradictions and a search for balance.

ENG 223 Cincinnati Authors (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent
This course examines significant literary works in a variety of genres by writers who are either native Cincinnatians or who have resided in Cincinnati for a period of time.

ENG 225 Women and Autobiographical Writing (3) L
This course examines the literary form of women's personal writing - diary, autobiography, memoir, letters - as well as alternate forms such as poetry, fiction, oral history, and the arts. Through autobiographical formats, perceptions of women in society as well as the common experiences of women's lives will be studied.

ENG 226 Multicultural Women Writers (3) L
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent
This course examines the variety of ways multicultural women writers express their evolving identities and their culture.

ENG 245 African-American Writers (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101/or Equiv.
This course surveys significant works by African-American writers, beginning with slave narratives and ending with contemporary novels.

ENG 245H Honors: African-American Writers (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent, IDS 100H Honors Seminar I and approval of the Honors Program Director
This course surveys significant works by African-American writers, beginning with slave narratives and ending with contemporary novels.

ENG 245S Ser Lrn:African-American Writers (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 245
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 260 19th-Century American Thought in Prose (3) L/CL/H/CH
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course examines significant historical documents and literature of the late 18th century and the first half of the 19th century in America, with special emphasis on how issues and ideas they present are interpreted through genres such as speeches, letters, political documents, essays, poetry, and fiction.

ENG 260H HON:19th-Century American Thought in Prose (0) L/CL/H/CH
Course description as stated in ENG 260 (Honors Course)

ENG 262 I Was Crazy Once:Impaired Mind in Lit (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
In this course we will examine 19th century literary depictions of madness and impairment and discuss how they illuminate 19th-century advances in science and medicine as well as 19th century assumptions about class. We will look at fiction, poetry and nonfiction.

ENG 262H HON:I Was Crazy Once:Impaired Mind in Lit (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 262 (Honors Course)

ENG 273 The Classical World (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
Crosslisted HIS 273. This course introduces the student to the Greco-Roman views of the world through a study of the history, philosophy, art, and literature of classical antiquity.

ENG 275 A History of Violence: Survey of 20th-Cent British Literature (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
This course will examine broad movements in twentieth century British literature-fiction, poetry, essays, and drama-that reflect the violent political and social upheavals of that era. We will discuss the historical, social, and cultural backdrop to these works.

ENG 276 The 20th-Century Graphic Novel (3) L/CL
Since the term "Graphic Novel" was first introduced as a label to describe a "new" genre of fiction, what that term really means and whether or not "books" that are written in such a format are really works of literature has been hotly contested. In this course we will look at graphic novels and a few film adaptations to reach the truth about the form and to understand the freedoms and advantages of the artistic medium as well as its significance to the canon of contemporary fiction.

ENG 276H HON:The 20th-Century Graphic Novel (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 276 (Honors Course)

ENG 276S Serv Lrng:The 20th-Century Graphic Novel (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 276
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 277 Dollars & Sense: Materialism in 20th-Century American Fiction (3) L/CL
This course will examine how the literature of the twentieth century examines materialism from the notion of the American dream to the realities of corporate greed.

ENG 277H HON:Dollars & Sense: Materialism in 20th Century American Fiction (0) L
Course description as stated in ENG 277 (Honors Course)

ENG 278 The End of the World as We Know It: Fiction After 9/11 (3) L/CL
This course will look at literature that examines the relationship that the United States has with the rest of the world, look at literature that recognizes life's dangers, and examine what such literature reflects about the times in which we currently live.

ENG 278H HON: The End of the World as We Know It: Fiction After 9/11 (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 278 (Honors Course)

ENG 279 Killing the Angel in the House: 20th-Cent Brit Women Novelists (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course will examine British women writers from the twentieth century, and discuss the ways in which they broke literary molds and led often daring, even scandalous, personal lives-"killing the angel in the house" or getting beyond the need to please a male audience.

ENG 280 In Their Own Voices: American Autobiography,Letters,Memoirs (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course examines first-person writing of Americans from the 18th-century to the present. Students will explore issues in American life and thought through autobiographies, letters and memoirs.

ENG 280H HON:In Their Own Voices:American Autobiography,Letters,Memoirs (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course examines first-person writing of Americans from the 18th-century to the present. Students will explore issues in American life and thought through autobiographies, letters and memoirs.

ENG 280S Serv Lrng: In Their Own Voices: American Autobiography, Letters,Memoirs (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 280
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 290 The Story of Your Life: Writing Diaries, Memoirs & Autobiographies (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101, 100-level literature course
This course will examine multiple techniques for writing about your own life. Students will produce substantial diary writing, and will shape a final manuscript of either a diary, memoir, or autobiography.

ENG 300 Advanced Composition (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent; COM 200 recommended
Crosslisted COM 300. A course in writing nonfiction. While most of the work is practical, some theoretical considerations are made regarding style and methods of adapting discourse to meet the needs of a variety of audiences. Writing assignments involve descriptive, expository and persuasive writing.

ENG 300S Serv Lrng:Adv Composition (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 300
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 301 The Past in Stages:A History of Theatre in Society (3) L
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or equivalent plus any one Drama Elective except ENG 350W, ENG 374, or ENG 397
From its origins in ancient tribal cultures, theatre has thrilled, chilled, angered, tickled, taught, moved, mocked, entertained, and otherwise performed the shared experience of being human. This upper-level course is a study of the history of the theatre as a social institution, tracing the ways that audiences, actors, and other producers have shaped the theatrical event to meet changing times and needs. Theatre history from the Greeks to the present is considered, with an emphasis on the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.

ENG 303 The School for Scandal: Restoration Comedy (3) L
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or equivalent plus any one Drama Elective except ENG 350W, ENG 374, or ENG 397
Restoration Comedy refers to the form of comedic theatre written and produced after the restoration of Charles II in England (roughly 1660-1700), and features bawdy situations, loose morals, and plots bursting with rakes, villains, and scoundrels. The goal of this course is to acquaint students with the major works of the period, and to address issues of audience, politics, gender, and societal norms.

ENG 350 Topics in Literature (1-3)
Special seminars, guided readings, minicourses of five or 10-week duration.

ENG 350H Cincinnati Authors (3)
Course description as stated in ENG 350 (Honors Course)

ENG 350X Literature for Teaching (3)
New Course

ENG 353 Topics:Literary Monsters Past & Present (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): ENG/COM 101
This course will examine literary texts and films dealing with monsters both literal and figurative, and discuss the ways in which monsters in literature tell us both what we ourselves are, and what we are not.

ENG 353H HON:Topics in Literature Vampires in Literature (3) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 353 (Honors Course)

ENG 354 Literary London (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
This course will survey British literature and will culminate in a trip to London. The focus of the course will be around the national character of British thought and the unique contributions that England has made to Western thought in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

ENG 359 American Film Authors (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, COM/ENG 101/or Equiv
Crosslisted COM 359. An in-depth study of major American film directors. The styles and major traits of these directors will be stressed through close examination of representative films. The course also addresses filmmaking as a collaborative art, examining the role of stars, writers, producers, and studios. Films and filmmakers will be placed within historical, sociological, and cultural contexts.

ENG 360 The Play's the Thing: Shakespeare's Major Works (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course will examine selected comedies, tragedies and histories from Shakespeare's body of work, and will include significant discussion of Shakespeare's life and times, situating him and his work in historical context.

ENG 370 Creative Writing: Poetry (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent
This course examines methods, models and practice in poetry writing.

ENG 371 Seminar in Creative Writing: Poetry (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): ENG 370 or equivalent
This course provides advanced study of methods, models and practice in poetry writing.

ENG 371S Serv Lrng:Sem Creative Writing:Poetry (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 371
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 372 Creative Writing: Fiction (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent
This course examines methods, models and practice in fiction writing.

ENG 372H HON:Creative Writing: Fiction (0) LAS
Course description as stated in ENG 372 (Honors Course)

ENG 373 Sem Creative Writing:Fiction (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): ENG 372 or equivalent
This course provides an advanced study of methods, models and practice in fiction writing.

ENG 374 Screenwriting Workshop (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
A course focusing on the craft of writing a full-length feature script (screenplay) and on the basic fundamentals of casting, filming, and editing scenes using digital editing equipment.

ENG 376 Novels Without Borders (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
In this class we will read fiction from former colonies such as the Caribbean, India, Africa, or elsewhere and examine where cultures clash, refuse each other, contaminate each other, uplift each other and control one another.

ENG 388 Feature Writing (3) LAS
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and ENG 101
This course stresses the craft of newspaper and magazine feature writing, with attention to leads, structure and polished prose, and ethics.

ENG 390 Independent Study (1-3)
Student-initiated research, project or creative work under faculty guidance. Permission of department required.

ENG 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

ENG 397 Theater Production (1-3) L
Students may earn up to 3 credits toward their English major with a concentration in drama over the course of their studies at the College by participating in student drama productions housed in the Department of English and Modern Languages. Variable credit: 1-3 credits. Learning contract required.

ENG 441Z Advanced Creative Writing (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor
An Auto-Study course.

ENG 461 Writing for Publication (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 101; COM 388 recommended
This course gives student advanced practice in feature writing, with emphasis on skills for placing their work in publications.

ENG 461Z Writing for Publication (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor
An Auto-Study course.

ENG 496 Co-Op:Alternating(FT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

ENG 499 English Senior Seminar Capstone (1) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours of Core curriculum completed and Senior Status
In this capstone/seminar experience the student will reflect on and integrate what he/she has learned in the study of literature and of the liberal arts and sciences.

ESF 330 Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement (3)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 131 or BIO 197 or BIO 201
Fundamentals of human motion as they relate to physical activities and skill performance. A study of the relationship of anatomical, physiological and mechanical principles to the muscular movement of the human form.

ESF 350 Exercise Physiology (4)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 131 or BIO 198 or BIO 202
Concurrent requisite(s): ESF 350A
This course examines human anatomy and physiology and its response to training. Study of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary systems as well as bioenergics, body composition, aging and health-related benefits will be integrated through a class and laboratory format.

ESF 350A Exercise Physiology (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ESF 350
Course description as stated in ESF 350

ESF 422 Athletic Conditioning and Performance (4)
Prerequisite(s): ESF 330, ESF 350/350A
Concurrent requisite(s): ESF 422A
This course addresses the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively assess, plan, and implement conditioning and performance enhancing strategies for athletes and physically active individuals. The course will prepare students for the National Strength and Condition Association (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) examination and other fitness credentials. Extensive study of proper execution of flexibility, strengthening, plyometric, and functional activities will be emphasized. Students taking this course may not also earn credit for ATR 320.

ESF 422A Athletic Conditioning and Performance(LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ESF 422
Course description as stated in ESF 422

ESF 470 Prin of Exercise Prescription and Assessment (4)
Prerequisite(s): ESF 422, ESF 350
Concurrent requisite(s): ESF 470
The course provides students with theoretical principles and practical experiences in exercise prescription and assessment in low-risk health populations, and populations with special needs related to cardiac conditioning, physical disabilities, diabetes, seniors, mentally impaired, and pregnancy. Health-related fitness, and exercise as medicine, rather than athletic-performance based fitness is emphasized. The course content is based upon guidelines published by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), and American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and provides a foundation for future NSCA and/or ACSM certification as a Certified Personal Trainer, and ACSM credentialing in Exercise is Medicine.

ESF 470A Prin of Exercise Prescription and Assessment (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ESF 470
Course description as stated in ESF 470

ESF 470S Serv Lrng:Prin of Exercise Prescription and Assessment (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ESF 470
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ESF 475 Exercise Program for Special Populations (3)
Prerequisite(s): ESF 422, ESF 350
This course will emphasize information regarding exercise for special populations related to cardiac conditioning, physical disabilities, diabetes, sensory impairment, pediatrics, seniors, mentally impaired, pregnancy, and infectious diseases throughout the lifespan. The course content is based upon guidelines published by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

ETH:PHI 203 Environmental Ethics (3) E/CE
This course is an introduction to the ethical features of the human relationship with the natural environment. In addition to the deontological, utilitarian, and virtue ethical perspectives on this environmental relation, this course will consider various approaches to environmental value, e.g., anthropocentrism, biocentrism, and ecocentrism, in an effort to identify and clarify potential obligations that moral agents have toward the natural environment. These theoretical considerations will be raised through an exposure to contemporary environmental problems, e.g., climate change, animal treatment, pollution, food production, and waste management.

ETH:PHI 203H HON:Environmental Ethics (0) E/CE
Course description as stated in ETH:PHI 203(Honors Course)u

ETH:PHI 203S Serv Lrng:Environmental Ethics (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ETH:PHI 203
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ETH:PHI 204 Contemporary Moral Debate (3) E/CE
This course takes an interdisciplinary, case-study approach to practical contemporary ethical issues in education, engineering, law, medicine, personal relationships, politics, etc. It focuses on the process or articulating one's own moral judgments on a variety of case studies and cultivating the necessary skills to defend those judgments.

ETH:PHI 240 Ethics (3) E/CE
This course is a study of the major ethical theories of the Western tradition. The action-based approach and the virtue-based approach will be covered. Fulfills Ethics requirement.

ETH:PHI 250 Health Care Ethics (3) E/CE
This course is a study of major ethical principles and their application to health care issues. Emphasis is on the method of decision making and health care policy. Fulfills Ethics requirement.

ETH:PHI 250S Serv Lrng:Health Care Ethics (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ETH:PHI 250
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ETH:PHI 397 Ethical Conduct of Business (3) E/CE
This course examines the moral dilemmas raised by the conduct of business. Topics to be discussed include: product safety, truth advertising, fair pricing, pollution, sexual harassment, and affirmative action. Fulfills Ethics requirement.

ETH:PHI 397H HON: Ethical Conduct of Business (0) E/CE
Course description as stated in ETH:PHI 397 (Honors Course)

ETH:REL 250 Christian Ethics (3) E
This course introduces students to the study of Christian ethics from the Catholic theological perspective. We begin by exploring the foundations of Christian ethics: the nature of the good, the relationship between faith and reason, and the importance of both free will and rightly formed conscience. We then focus on specific topics, chosen by students, in the areas of social, medical, and sexual ethics. For each of the chosen topics, we discuss the underlying moral principles and seek to articulate an appropriate Christian response to them.

ETH:REL 250S Serv Lrng:Christian Ethics (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ETH:REL 250
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ETH:REL 251 Business Ethics (3) E/CE
This course is designed to offer students an introduction to the study of business ethics from both a philosophical and theological perspective. We begin by examining 1) foundational philosophical theories and 2) the principles of Catholic Social Teaching and demonstrate how each is related to ethical business activity. We then focus on specific challenges concerning - but not limited to - corporate governance, socially responsible investing, product safety, truth in advertising, and doing business in an international context. For each of these challenges, we discuss the underlying moral principles and seek to articulate appropriate philosophical and theological responses to them.

ETH:REL 252 Theological Health Care Ethics (3) E/CE
This course offers students an introduction to the study of health care ethics from the Catholic theological perspective. We begin by exploring foundational topics such as the relationship between faith and reason and the moral principles that govern the patient-professional relationship. We then focus on ethical challenges concerning particular health care topics. These topics include-but are not limited to-determining when human life begins (and its associated implications for medicine), treatment for critically ill newborns, genetic screening/testing, and the duties of health care professionals with regard to end of life care. The course seeks to help students, and in turn the patients for whom they will care, formulate appropriate responses to the many ethical challenges they will face in the health care field.

ETH:REL 256 Sexual and Reproductive Ethics (3) E/CE
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing or Above
Human sexuality and reproduction are two controversial and often misunderstood topics. This course offers students an opportunity to reflect upon issues concerning sexuality and reproduction in light of the Catholic moral tradition, and it encourages students to critically evaluate the teachings of the Catholic tradition from their own philosophical and theological perspectives.

ETH:REL 269 Environmental Ethics:A Call to Conscience in a Time of Climate Change (3) E/CE
In a time when the adverse effects of anthropogenic climate change are beginning to be felt, this course will examine how to respond to a call to conscience from a Catholic theological perspective. We will explore the principles of faith and reason and the resources of the Catholic tradition regarding stewardship, the common good, and the option for the poor and vulnerable as they relate to climate change. In analyzing contemporary environmental problems, we will engage in dialogue in order to seek personal and social courses of action to care for creation.

ETH:REL 269S Serv Lrng:Environmental Ethics:A Call to Conscience in a Time of Climate Change (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ETH:REL 269
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ETH:REL 342 Ethics in Ministry (3) E
New Course
One of the pastoral minister's many functions is to educate people in their faith, and one of the most challenging times this must be done is when a person is facing an important ethical decision. Poignant ethical questions face us every day and for many people they pose significant challenges of faith. In this course, we explore the field of Catholic theological ethics. Students will examine the foundations of the Church's ethical tradition and propose a "code of ethics" for the pastoral minister. We then explore a number of "critical issues" from three primary topic areas: social ethics, sexual ethics, and medical ethics. The overall purpose of this course is to offer the pastoral minister 1) knowledge of what the Roman Catholic Church teaches concerning pressing ethical issues, as well as why it teaches what it does; and 2) a foundation upon which to draw when faced with the question "What should I do?" in light of a particular ethical dilemma.

EXC 103 Studying for Success (2)
A course designed to promote the development of skills basic to success in college. The focus will include: reading in the content areas; strategies for effective notetaking; preparing for a broad range of test formats; organizing and managing time; utilizing instructional resources; improving communication skills; becoming a self-advocate on a university campus.

FIN 102 Personal Finance (3)
Foundations for planning and management of an integrated financial plan. Includes personal budgeting, credit, savings institutions, insurance, annuities, investments.

FIN 300 Corporate Finance (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 213
Fundamental concepts of managerial finance. Topics include financial analysis and control, capital market theories, long-term financial decision analysis.

FIN 350A International Finance (2)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): FIN 300
Fundamental concepts of managerial finance. Topics include financial analysis and control, capital market theories, long-term financial decision analysis.

FIN 360 Money and Banking (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211, 212
Crosslisted ECO 360. Money, financial markets, and financial institutions are described and analyzed with economic tools such as supply and demand. The role of a central bank will be discussed along with the international financial system. Different monetary and fiscal policies will also be analyzed.

FIN 395 Finance and Economics in the Sport Industry (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): ACC 213, ACC 214, CIS 135, ECO 211, MKT 300
Corequisite(s): SPM 330
This course discusses contemporary examples from marketing, sponsorship, facility construction, and sport law to illustrate the crucial role that money, budget, and finance plays in the finance and economics of the sport business. The economics of sport teams, championships, and merchandising will also be discussed.

FIN 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

FIN 410 Fundamentals of Investing (3)
Prerequisite(s): FIN 300
Examines investment theory, capital market theory, the securities market, the investment environment, and valuation and analysis of stocks and bonds. The course focuses on funds, portfolio analysis, evaluation, and management.

FIN 420 Case Study Analysis of Finance (3)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
Analysis of finance problems through the use of case studies, oral and visual presentations. Topics include: forward financial planning, asset management, financial instruments and markets, multinational finance and capital budgeting techniques.

FIN 450 Financial Market (3)
New Course
The course is designed to provide a theoretical and practical application framework. The course will outline financial systems of money, capital markets and the financial system. An in-depth analysis of selected financial topics. The format will include an investigation of text concepts, readings and guest/lectures.

FIN 453 Current Topics in Finance (3)
Prerequisite(s): FIN 300
Covers selected topics in finance. May be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

FIN 490 Seminar in Finance (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): FIN 300
Examines selected finance topics in-depth through readings and group discussion. May be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

FIN 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

FOR 210 Survey of Forensic Science (4) IDS
Prerequisite(s): One semester of college-level science, MTH 098/Equiv, COM 100 and COM 101 or ENG 101
This course explores the forensic sciences, and integrates biology, physics, chemistry and other relevant sciences through forensic applications. Students will research topics, obtain, analyze and interpret data, and present their results in oral and written formats. Lecture and Laboratory.

FOR 211 Forensic Science I (4)
Prerequisite(s): One of the following core sciences: BIO 101, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 131, BIO 197, CHE 104, CHE 105, or PHY 105; plus MTH 098 (or equivalent), and COM 100.
This course explores some of the biological applications within forensic science, such as hair, fingerprints, anthropology, odontology, pathology, decomposition, serology, DNA, entomology, and detection dogs. Students will research appropriate topics, obtain, analyze, and interpret data, and present their results in oral and written formats. Lecture and Laboratory.

FOR 212 Forensic Science II (4)
Prerequisite(s): One of the following core sciences: BIO 101, BIO 110, BIO 111, BIO 131, BIO 197, CHE 104, CHE 105, or PHY 105; plus MTH 098 (or equivalent), and COM 100.
This course explores some of the chemistry and physics applications within forensic science, such as fibers, paints, glass, soil, questioned documents, firearms and toolmarks, blood spatter, fires and explosions, forensic engineering, digital evidence, forensic chemistry, toxicology and illicit drugs. Students will research appropriate topics, obtain, analyze, and interpret data, and present their results in oral and written formats. Lecture and Laboratory.

FOR 215 Forensic Science Integrated Seminar (2)
Prerequisite(s): IDS 210 or CRM 103 or Permission of Instructor
Students will examine the interactions of forensic science and law enforcement, and research forensic science career options and the necessary preparations for them. Interdisciplinary topics to be explored include cold case resolution, forensic science in the courtroom, missing and unidentified persons cases, and forensic science in mass disaster settings. This course is primarily intended for students seeking the Forensic Science Minor; however, it is open to all. This course DOES NOT satisfy the core IDS 200-level requirement, but rather an elective only.

GEG 202 World Regional Geography (3) S
World geography is a study of major regions of the world, focusing on spatial patterns and processes. Some of the variables which produce patterns of world diversity are gender, race, politics, economics, climates, and demographics.

GEO 115 Earth Science (L/L) (4) N/CN
Components of physical and historical geology are considered, including the earth, its materials, processes and history. Students will be introduced to responsible use of earth resources, the basics of map interpretation, rock, mineral and fossil identification, and recognition and interpretation of landforms.

GEO 115H HON:Earth Science (L/L) (0) N/CN
Course description as stated in GEO 115H (Honors Course)

GEO 120 Geology of Cincinnati (4) N/CN
Geology of Cincinnati provides students with an overview of introductory topics in geology with an emphasis on the glacier and fossil history of Southwest Ohio. The course emphasizes the area's present-day minerals, rocks, plant and animal communities, landforms, topography, and geological structures as legacies of its geological past. The course also relates the geological processes acting in the past and present with the cultural development of Cincinnati. Geology of Cincinnati is designed to accommodate students with no college-level science background. Field trips will be scheduled. Lecture, lab.

GEO 120A Geology/Cincinnati (LAB) (0) N
Concurrent requisite(s): GEO 120
Course description as stated in GEO 120

GEO 120H HON:Geology of Cincinnati (L/L) (0) CN
Course description as stated in GEO 120 (Honors Course)

GEO 120S Serv Lrng:Geology of Cincinnati (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): GEO 120
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

GEO 130 Oceanography (L/L) (4) N/CN
A study of the past, present and possible futures of the largest component of earth's hydrosphere the world's oceans, beginning with the formation of earth and tracing the coevolution of the hydrosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. The immense changes in ocean distribution and circulation and the global impacts forced by plate tectonics and continental drift serve as a starting point for a study of wind and density driven circulations and how the ocean controls and is controlled by the atmosphere producing world climates. The emphasis is on the physical features of the oceans and compliments course work in marine biology. Lecture and laboratory.

GEO 135 Environmental Geology (L/L) (4) N/CN
An introductory course in geology as it relates to human activities. The student will be given an overview of geologic materials and processes followed by an introduction to natural and unnatural hazards, consumption of natural resources, problems of waste disposal and pollution, and other related problems. Required field trips may be scheduled.

GEO 140 Environmental Science (4) N/CN
Crosslisted BIO 140. An introduction to the basic principles and issues in Environmental Science. Topics include: physical and biological environments, and their intra-dependencies and inter-dependencies, resources and resource management, pollution, world-view, social justice, population and development --- global and local perspectives included. Scientific concepts necessary to understand these issues and to make informed decisions on environmental matters will be included. Fieldtrips required, during class/lab time.

GEO 140S Serv Lrng:Environmental Science (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): GEO 140
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

GEO 165 Meteorology (L/L) (4) N/CN
A study of the conditions of the atmosphere that produce weather, i.e., air temperature, humidity, clouds, precipitation, pressure and winds. The course will include an introduction to weather prediction and interpretation of satellite imagery. Lecture and Laboratory.

GRD 104 Digital Literacy I (1)
The focus of this course is on developing a proficiency using the current software in the field of communication design. The software is just one half of the puzzle. The other half is understanding how they are used in a creative problem solving environment. The applications covered include Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. Proficiency will be attained through a series of exercises specific to each software program. Students will be introduced to illustration, layout image manipulation and the cross-functionality of each.

GRD 105 Digital Literacy II (1)
The focus of this course is navigating and designing within open source websites for both personal and professional use. We will also explore other non-HTML site generating opportunities. Computer proficiency and entry level design sensibilities will be attained through a series of technical problem solving exercises specific to open source website creation.

GRD 206 Digital Design (3)
Prerequisite(s): ART/GRD/IAD 103
This course focuses on the computer tools used in graphic design. The student will be introduced to layout, illustration, and image manipulation software, their individual strengths, and how they can be used together. There will be a review of the computing options at the Mount (software & hardware), as well as the output options on and off campus. The applications that will be covered are InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop. Throughout the semester, production procedures geared toward final output will be covered as well as the concerns and responsibilities of using the computer as a design tool. During the semester the student will do exercises covering the techniques discussed in class. After learning each program the student will do a project which will evaluate their proficiency in using it as both a production and a design tool. The final project will require the use of all three programs together.

GRD 207 Digital Literacy III (1)
The focus of this course is advanced InDesign user techniques including multi-page layout design and methodology, ebook development, print, web, PDF's and production. Students will move through the whole process from design to final production. This course is designed for students to problem solve, generate concept sketches, create multiple layouts, illustrate and design. Final production and tight deadlines will start to prepare students for a job in the design industry.

GRD 250 Typography I (3)
Prerequisite(s): ART/GRD/IAD 103
This course will introduce students to traditional letterform design and typographic composition. Classical type styles will be identified and drawn by hand. An overview of the history typography and letterform design will be investigated.

GRD 251 Advanced Typography:Problem Solving (3)
Prerequisite(s): GRD 250
This course will advance students in letterform design and typographic composition. Innovative type styles will be identified and drawn digitally. This course will use the computer lab extensively for investigation and experimentation with classic and non-traditional layout techniques. The industry standard software programs will be thoroughly analyzed.

GRD 253 Digital Illustration (3)
Prerequisite(s): ART/GRD/IAD 103/Equiv
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of digital illustration. It includes exploration of creating imagery using Adobe Illustrator, starting with exercises to learn the software and advancing to varied illustration and graphic design projects.

GRD 255 Graphic Form (3)
Prerequisite(s): ART 103/Equiv
Graphic Form covers symbolic communication through the generation of both pictorial and abstract visual symbols. Concepts covered in this course include graphic translation, media exploration, communication of content through abstract form, and designing symbol systems. Emphasis is placed on conceptual thinking and visual problem-solving skills. The primary objectives are for the student to develop a variety of solutions to visual communication problems, learn new design methodologies, understand the importance of each step of the design process, employ the design process and develop skills in critical assessment of their own work as well as others.

GRD 270 Web Design (3)
Prerequisite(s): ART 103/Equiv
Web Design introduces the student to designing for on-screen viewing. The difference between print design and interactive design will be discussed. Through a series of exercises the student will gain the knowledge to design a functional website by the end of the course. Students will work with the software programs Dreamweaver and MUSE while developing a basic understanding of HTML and CSS.

GRD 350 Hand to Pixel (3)
Prerequisite(s): ART 103 and GRD 104
This workshop explores traditional hand materials with bitmap and vector techniques through a variety of processes. We will look at how these materials can both shape and influence visual communication. Creative exploration is promoted and students must be willing to work beyond the constraints of the computer. Students will complete a series of assignments that investigate different approaches to synthesizing hand and pixel into design pieces of art. This class will cover the creation of elaborate imagery with digital tools (including Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop), and with a variety of hand methods to explore the dynamic interaction between different medias to produce a new expression for communication.

GRD 351 Design Narrative (3)
Prerequisite(s): ART/GRD/IAD 103/Equiv
This course introduces the student to creating narrative (i.e. telling a story) by sequencing type and/or image through time using Adobe Creative Suite software. Digital animation is the main focus of this course, using the Adobe After Effects software.

GRD 353 Typography II (3)
Prerequisite(s): GRD 250/Equiv
This course advances students' understanding and application of the core concepts of typographic organization, including typographic hierarchy, grid systems, designing a series, pacing, flow, and sequential viewing. Emphasis is placed on exploring type and image interaction to give form and meaning to a variety of messages and ideas.

GRD 355 Information Graphics (3)
Prerequisite(s): ART 103/Equiv
This course will introduce third year graphic design students to principles of visual semantics. Students will explore and discover the interaction of ideas, form, and typography through an information graphic. Concepts such as Dynamic Symmetry and Visual Semantics will be thoroughly investigated.

GRD 356 Brand Identity Design (3)
Prerequisite(s): GRD 355
Brand Identity Design encompasses the symbolic and typographic development of an identity using informed design choices around what a brand should stand for in the hearts and minds of the intended audience. Included in project work for this course is symbol design, logotype design, and evolving the brand identity to print and/or online touchpoints.

GRD 370 Advanced Web & Interactive Design (3)
Prerequisite(s): GRD 352/Equiv
Advanced Web and Interactive Design will focus on high-end web design and its interactive capabilities. This course is structure for upper level students (junior or above). A basic knowledge of HTML or Adobe Dreamweaver is necessary for this course to be successful for the student. The software program Adobe Flash will be investigated. The student will design and publish to the World Wide Web a sophisticated multi-level Web Site implementing the latest techniques in Motion Graphics.

GRD 396 Co-Op:Parallel (PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
An art-related work experience supervised by an art faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation and evaluation. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated up to nine credit hours.

GRD 400 Senior Design Seminar (1)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): Senior Status in Graphic Design Program
This capstone seminar is designed to integrate the courses of the Graphic Design major with the core curriculum. Course content will be based upon the following spring's senior degree topic, including studying this theme from the multiple perspectives of the six baccalaureate learning outcomes that have been an integral part of students' college learning experience. Planned activities include reading, research, writing discourse, and presentation. Course learning will serve as the basis for each student's spring senior degree campaign and exhibit. Documented material from this course will also be used to assess program effectiveness.

GRD 400S Serv Lrng:Senior Design Seminar:Capstone (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): GRD 400
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

GRD 455 Professional Portfolio (3)
Prerequisite(s): GRD 356
The development of an identity, design system and collateral pieces for a client; includes emphasis on type & image theory, process work, file preparation and presentation techniques.

GRD 456 Senior Degree Project (3)
Prerequisite(s): GRD 455
In-depth supervised research and design of a campaign developed by the students from their portfolio of college studies; culminates in these exhibit; includes LAS caption reflection paper.

GRD 470 Web & Interactive Design Seminar (3)
Prerequisite(s): GRD 370 or instructor approval
Students will prepare final program summation. The students will present written and visual documentation of a significant interactive project. Projects and discussions, outside consultants to visit and give advice to the students.

GRD 496 Co-Op:Alternating (FT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
An art-related work experience supervised by an art faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation and evaluation. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated up to nine credit hours.

GST 261 Social and Psychological Aspects of Aging (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Crosslisted SOC 261. An explanation of the basic sociological and psychological concepts and principles of aging individuals. Topics such as the social theories of aging, socialization, life course, social inequality, primary relationships, economy, the community, politics, and government will be covered.

GST 332 Holistic Wellness and Aging (3) IDS
This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to integrate knowledge and concepts about holistic health across multiple disciplines and applies them to the maintenance of wellness in aging. Concepts and approaches address the physical, mental, nutritional, social, spiritual, and cognitive aspects of wellness.

GST 333 Elder Abuse (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H or SOC 103
Crosslisted SWK 333. This course will explore the topic of elder abuse from multiple perspectives including the spiritual, psychological, legal, ethical, and health impact of abuse. The global, cultural, social, economic and political factors contributing to elder abuse, victim assistance and methods to prevent abuse will be discussed.

GST 340 Spirituality and Aging (3) S/R
Prerequisite(s): 100 Level REL
Crosslisted REL 340. A holistic approach to the enrichment and growth of elderly persons' spiritual experience will be examined from a nondenominational point of view with references to psychology and the behavioral sciences. Topics such as prayer, reconciliation and peace, interpersonal relationships, the faith of the elderly, and stages of development will be discussed.

GST 350 Special Topics Global Aging: Comparative Perspectives (1-3)
Crosslisted SOC 350. Announcement of topics will be made when course is offered.

GST 351 Aging Institute (1)
The Aging Institute is a conference on issues related to the older adult population and the field of aging. Students have the unique opportunity of listening to experts in gerontology. In addition, students are required to do a paper on the issues addressed during the Institute and write either a critique or summary of the presentation. All written work is submitted at the end of the semester.

GST 358 Organizational Administration in Healthcare (3) S
Crosslisted SWK 358. This course examines some of the administrative, managerial and human resource issues in the area of social community. Particular emphasis is given to the leadership function of the LTC/agency administrator in the aging and social network.

GST 359 Work, Leisure and Retirement (3) S
This course provides an overview of work with the emphasis on the importance, background, development, and current trends of work, retirement and leisure issues in the United States. Comparisons are made on how other cultures address these issues.

GST 360 Mental Health & Aging (3) S
This course provides an historical overview of the mental health system. Common emotional problems, psychiatric and cognitive disorders, and community mental health issues are addressed. In addition, mental health promotion as well as intervention in and treatment of mental health problems among older persons and their families.

GST 365 Health and Interdisciplinary Assessment of the Elderly (3)
This course will cover the components, purpose, impact and application of interdisciplinary assessment. The use of assessment instruments and regulations governing assessment of residents will be addressed.

GST 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

GST 432 Gerontology Practicum (3)
Prerequisite(s): May be completed after at least 5 gerontology courses have been taken
Assignment to a community organization or agency for career training or a specialized project involved in one's area of interest. The practicum is 135 clock hours in length. In addition, students will meet periodically to discuss problems, concerns and issues in the placement.

GST 496 Co-Op:Alternatng(FT) (1-3) EXP
Corequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

HIS 105 World Civilization to 1500 (3) H/CH
A study of the development of the early cultures and civilizations of the world from their beginnings to approximately 1500 CE.

HIS 106 World Civilization Since 1500 (3) H/CH
A study of the development of the cultures and civilizations of the world from approximately 1500 CE to the present

HIS 107 European Civilization to 1500 (3) H/CH
In order to better understand current issues facing the industrialized world, one must understand the ideas, values, events and persons critical to the development of European civilization. As we examine European history from the late Roman Empire to the early Renaissance, we will begin to understand the major concepts of humanity and society as defined in Europe and how these both unified and divided its inhabitants.

HIS 108 European Civilization Since 1500 (3) H/CH
A survey of European culture from the Renaissance to the present.

HIS 109 U.S. History to 1877 (3) H/CH
This course surveys the political, economic, and cultural forces that transformed North American British colonies into the United States of America through the first century of the nation's existence. Topics include colonial development, the Revolutionary War, issues of race, class, and gender facing the early Republic, sectional tensions culminating in the Civil War, and attempts at Reconstruction following war's end. An emphasis is placed on interpreting historical sources.

HIS 109S Serv Lrng:U.S. Hist to 1877 (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 109
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 110 U.S. History Since 1877 (3) H/CH
This course examines the political, economic, and social forces that have directed American development from Reconstruction to the present. An emphasis is placed upon interpreting historical sources.

HIS 110H HON:U.S. History Since 1877 (0) H/CH
Course description as stated in HIS 110 (Honors Course)

HIS 110S Serv Lrng:U.S. Hist Since 1877 (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 110
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 200 Local History (3) H/CH
This course explores the development of the Greater Cincinnati area, primarily from the late eighteen century to the present, using the Cincinnati region as a model for discussing American urban growth in general. It considers the people, places, events, and issues that formed this small but hugely significant part of the country and discusses how they helped to shape and were shaped by the larger history of the United States of America.

HIS 200S Serv Lrng:Local History (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 200
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 211 U.S. History Since 1945 (3) H/CH
This course is an examination of American society during the seven decades following World War II. Among the topics considered are the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War, the counterculture, feminism, and modern conservatism.

HIS 211S Serv Lrng:U.S.His Since 1945 (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 211
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 215 The Second Rome:Byzantine Empire (3) H
New Course
Corequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
An examination of the Byzantine Empire and its relation to the Medieval Mediterranean, Islamic and Slavic worlds

HIS 225 The Best of Both Worlds: The Ottoman Empire (3) H
New Course
Corequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
An examination of the Ottoman Empire and its influence on the Medieval and Early Modern European, Islamic and Slavic worlds.

HIS 230 Competing Identities:The Modern Middle East (3) H/CH
This course examines the conflicting ideas, people, and events that created the contemporary Middle East out of the former Ottoman Empire after World War I. Emphasis is placed on using primary documents as historical sources.

HIS 235 Before Columbus: The Native Americas (3) H
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
An examination of native North and South American civilizations before European contact in 1492

HIS 236 From Cortez to Costco Impact of European Contact with the Americas on the Food We Eat (3) H/CH
This course examines the effects of European contact with the Americas on global biodiversity from the 15th century to the present.

HIS 240 Dar Al-Islam: Early Islamic Culture (3) H
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
An examination of the rise and development of the early Islamic caliphates to the beginning of the Ottoman period.

HIS 260 19th Century American Thought In Prose (3) L/CL/H/CH
New Course
Corequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course examines significant historical and documents and literature of the late 18th century and the first half of the 19th century in America, with special emphasis on how issues and ideas they present are interpreted through genres such as speeches, letters, political documents, essays, poetry, and fiction.

HIS 270 Nihilism, Nuremberg & Nukes Europe in the 20th Century (3) H/CH
New Course
Prerequisite(s): HIS 108 Recommended
This course examines the social and cultural history of Europe in the 20th century, paying particular attention to the ways in which the arts reflect responses to war, peace, and politics.

HIS 271 Science, Technology & Gender in the Modern Age (3) H
New Course
This course examines the development, distribution, and application of technology and whether or not ideas regarding gender are a factor.

HIS 273 The Classical World (3) LAS
Crosslisted ENG 273. This course introduces the student to the Greco-Roman views of the world through a study of the history, philosophy, art, and literature of classical antiquity.

HIS 281 Women in American History (3) H
This course is a study of women's experiences in American history, Native American and colonial women to the 21st century.

HIS 282 Women in European History 1500 to Present (3) H
New Course
This course examines the experience of women in Europe and Europe's colonial holdings from the Renaissance to the present, and how sex, gender, race and class affected women's experience.

HIS 295 Punch Lines & Pratfalls History of American Humor (3) H
Prerequisite(s): HIS 110 or HIS 211
What's so funny? This course examines the various ways that Americans have answered this question from the founding of the Republic to the present, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. The evolution of a uniquely American humor, as well as its performance and reception, is analyzed not only as an expression of popular culture but also as a particularly potent articulation of democracy.

HIS 305 Before Writing: World Pre-History (3) H
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and COM/ENG 101
An examination of pre-bronze and -iron age cultures found in the Old and New Worlds.

HIS 326 The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment (3) CH
New Course
An examination of the period between 1500 and 1789, focusing on the development of "science" and how it shaped ideas about humans and their world.

HIS 330 American Foreign Relations (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): HIS 110 or HIS 211 Recommended
Crosslisted PSC 330. This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of American foreign relations from the early days of the Republic until the present. An emphasis will be placed upon the emergence of the United States as a world power in the 20th century.

HIS 345 The Revolutionary Tradition in France (3) H
New Course
Students will examine the use of revolution as a means of political and social change in France from 1789 to 1900.

HIS 361 Contemporary Japan and its Roots (3) CH
This course explores the impact of pre-modern Japan on contemporary Japanese history and culture. The class culminates in a twelve-day trip to Japan. Students will explore the country's fine arts, history, culture, and religious beliefs from the Edo Era (1615-1868) to the present. They will learn how these forces influenced contemporary Japanese art and cultural life.

HIS 379 Oral History and the Aging Process (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor
Crosslisted GST 379. This course introduces the student to the methods of oral history by examining America's recent past through interviews with those who have lived through it. An emphasis is placed on how the aging process affects memory and recollection.

HIS 385 Sea, Sail & Song: Early American Maritime History (3) H/CH/EXP
Prerequisite(s): 15 or more credit hours earned and min 2.0 cum GPA
This immersion course will feature travel to the coast of Maine this summer to explore the development of early national identity through Americans' extensive reliance on water, especially the ocean. Together we will study how life on various frontiers--between land and sea and between native American and European cultures--created new ideas concerning individualism, independence, and eventually, a new American character. Particular attention will be paid to how this process was expressed through folk music. Activities will include music workshops, service at a seventeenth century archaeological site, kayaking, and an overnight sail on a historic two-masted schooner.

HIS 385S Serv Lrng:Sea,Sail & Song:Early American Maritime History (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 385
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
This course is a history-related work experience supervised by a Humanities Department coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

HIS 398 Internship at the Cincinnati Historical Society (1-4)
This course offers practical experience in photographic arrangement and preservation, exhibit preparation, manuscript processing, reference correspondence, and work with printed materials and the education system.

HIS 400 American History Seminar (3)
The seminar in American history provides the student with an opportunity to research a particular topic in American history and write a paper of significant length.

HIS 401 European History Seminar (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours completed in the CORE curriculum, plus a minimum of nine hours in European History
The European History Seminar not only provides the students with an opportunity to research and write a paper of significant length on a particular topic in European history, but also gives the students the opportunity to assess the six baccalaureate degree learning outcomes that have been an integral part of their college learning experience.

HIS 410Z Roman History (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor is required
This course is a study of how Rome developed from a small settlement on the Tiber to become master of the Mediterranean. An Auto-Study course.

HIS 415Z History of India (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor is required
This course is an examination of the historical development of India with particular emphasis on the relationship of its religious tradition to its political and cultural uniqueness. An Auto-Study course.

HIS 480 Directed Independent Study (1-4)
This individualized course allows for reading, research, or creative work on a selected era or aspect of history.

HIS 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
This is a history-related work experience supervised by a Humanities Department coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

HLT 100 Pathways to the Health Professions (2)
Designed to be taken early in the student's academic careers, this course gives students a basic understanding of the U.S. healthcare system, current issues in healthcare, and an overview of the various professions available within the healthcare system. The course encourages students to develop their career goals and the skills necessary for successful admission to graduate study in the health professions.

HLT 100S Serv Lrng:Pathways to the Health Professions (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HLT 100
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HLT 181 First-Aid & Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (3)
The student will learn advanced first aid techniques applicable for the athletic trainer, coach, teacher or other person who is primarily responsible for the health care of others. Upon successful course completion the student will receive certification from the American Red Cross in CPR for the Professional Rescuer.

HLT 181S Serv Lrng:First-Aid & Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HLT 181
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HLT 200 Foundations of Wellness (3)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
This course explores the emotional, environmental, intellectual, occupational, physical, social, and spiritual dimensions of well-being, quality of life, and overall health. Students will examine both personal and community factors influencing healthy and high risk behaviors, and be introduced to the current healthcare system in the U.S., and the concepts of health disparities and cultural competence. The roles of health and wellness professionals and health disciplines will be introduced.

HLT 200S Serv Lrng:Foundations of Wellness (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HLT 200
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HLT 230 Health Promotion and Health Systems (3)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
This course introduces students to the concepts of health behavior change theory and health systems, as well as how each impacts health initiatives and outcomes. Students will gain understanding of how public policy, health disparities, and evidence-based practice impact health promotion. Students will be asked to apply concepts of health promotion to a particular health disparity.

HLT 230S Serv Lrng:Health Promotion and Healt Systems (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HLT 230
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HLT 310 Health Disparities and Global Wellness Issues (3)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103, HLT 200 and HLT 210 or HLT 260 or Permission of Instructor
This course examines major global health challenges, programs and policies. Students will be introduced to the world's vast diversity of determinants of health and disease. Students will analyze current and emerging global health priorities, including emerging infectious diseases, poverty, conflicts and emergencies, health inequity, health systems reforms, and major global initiatives for disease prevention and health promotion. Students will be asked to draw comparisons to local health disparities in their own communities.

HLT 320 Epidemiology of Physical Activity (3)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
This course provides an epidemiological foundation to physical activity research and its impact on health and well-being for individuals and communities, with special attention given to traditionally under-represented populations. Participants will examine the literature relative to the impact of regular physical activity and sedentary lifestyle on chronic diseases and quality of life. Individual and community-based barriers and culturally competent health-based strategies to promote physical activity will be discussed.

HLT 330 Health and Wellness Promotion and Programming (3)
Prerequisite(s): Justice and the Common Good, HLT 200 and HLT 210 or HLT 260 or Permission of Instructor
This course examines the various aspects of health promotion and factors to consider when planning a health promotion intervention. Students will gain understanding of how assessment, public policy, culture, ethical issues and previous research impact health promotion planning. Students will be asked to apply concepts of health promotion to a particular population of interest.

HLT 330S Serv Lrng:Health and Wellness Promotion and Programming (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HLT 330
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 ours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values

HLT 360 Human Nutrition (3)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and MTH 099 or above
This course focuses on the relationship of human nutrition and maintenance of a healthy lifestyle. Students will examine the importance of health disparities in diet quality and health outcomes. Emphasis will be on current research and evidence based practices related to nutritional concerns during physical training and activities, nutritional supplements, nutritional controversies, stress management, substance abuse, and special nutritional needs of various physically active groups.

HLT 396 Co-Op:Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): HLT 200, Junior Status or Above, and Departmental Permission
A work experience supervised by a faculty member in the School of Health Sciences, in collaboration with the cooperative extension staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of compliance with a pre-determined learning contract. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

HLT 399 Independent Study in Health and Wellness (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): HLT 200, Junior Status or Above, and Departmental Permission
Independent study under the guidance of a faculty member to meet stated learning objectives. Written learning contract agreed upon by the department chairperson and faculty member required.

HLT 430 Research in the Health Sciences (3)
This course focuses on the interaction of the components of the research process with application to the theory and practice of healthcare. This course emphasizes the critical appraisal and utilization of health-related research including selected theories and ethical considerations. Critical and reflective thinking, as a health care clinician who provides evidence based practice, will be emphasized.

HLT 440 Health and Wellness Assessment and Programming (3)
Prerequisite(s): HLT 230
Concurrent requisite(s): HLT 440S
This course provides students with an in-depth exploration of Health Promotion Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation. Special emphasis involves tailoring Health Promotion Programs to historically-underrepresented populations both in the U.S. and abroad, in areas of health disparities. In this course, students will deepen their understating of Health Promotion Programs by conducting a Needs Assessment, and developing a culturally-appropriate and evidence-based Promotion Program.

HLT 440S Serv Lrng:Health and Wellness Assessment and Programming (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HLT 440
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This course requires a co-requisite one-credit hour Service Learning course, with 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HLT 450 Health and Wellness Practicum (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): Senior Status or Permission of the Instructor
The student will complete a minimum of 200 hours in an approved Health and Wellness related setting under the supervision of professionals whose expertise, interest, and time meet those of the student's professional goals. Students will prepare portfolio of materials and be evaluated by the site supervisor and a faculty supervisor.

HLT 451 Healthcare Administration (3)
Prerequisite(s): HLT 200
Students in this course will be exposed to the role of the healthcare administrator. They will discuss and learn personnel and organization management skills in relation to the healthcare setting and the global economy. Students will learn about employment practices, liability and ethical issues, budgeting, event planning and the ever-changing face of healthcare.

HLT 451S Serv Lrng:Healthcare Administration (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HLT 451
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HON 200 Honors Current Topics (0-3)
Each semester, students will examine a current world issue that has implications for many academic disciplines and many different aspects of contemporary life. Topics will change with each offering. Course will be a seminar format and will include a set of public forums on the semester's topic.

HON 201 Honors Experience I (1)
New Course
Sophomore students in the Honors Program will engage with one another and interact with guest speakers through a semester-long series of talks and events focusing on service, leadership, innovation, and a wide variety of specific subject areas. Opportunities for attendance and participation are flexible to allow for busy schedules. Students will reflect on the value of these experiences through the maintenance of a journal, periodic group discussions, and active service to the Mount community.

HON 260 Honors: Cincinnati Arts Scene (1-3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): 15 or more credit hours earned and approval of the Honors Program Director
In this course students will study the history of various performing and visual arts in Cincinnati, hear from people behind the scenes of the local arts, and immerse themselves in a variety of arts offerings in Cincinnati. Students may take the class twice; open to Honors students and other Juniors/Seniors with Honors Director's approval.

HON 261 HON:United Nations Sustainable Development Goals:Global & Local (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status, e.g., 28 completed credit hours, minimum GPA 2.0, Honors Director approval
In this course, students will travel to New York for a three-day orientation to the Millennial Goals of the United Nations. While there, they will tour the United Nations, visit with a mission from another country to see how the goals affect that country, and have an opportunity for conversation with United States representatives to the UN. They will also learn about Elizabeth Ann Seton's life in New York by visiting significant locations from her life such as Ellis Island and Episcopal and Catholic churches. During the semester, students will research one of the Millennial Goals and its connection to local issues. Students will also serve a local organization with some connection to the UN Millennial Goals.

HON 261S Serv Lrng:United Nations Sustainable Development Goals:Global & Local (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HON 261
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HON 262 HON:Exploring Science & Faith (3) IDS
In this course, we will examine neuroscience and social science research on beliefs, common elements of faith, and relationships among faith, practice, and organized faith systems. We will examine specific conflicts between and possibilities for reconciling scientific and faith perspectives. This inquiry will include panel discussions with faculty guests, field experiences, and class discussions. To integrate ideas from across the semester, both students and faculty will write and present belief statements to the class.

HON 263 HON:Museums,Monuments & Meaning (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): IDS 100 or IDS 100/CORE 115
In this course, students will travel to Washington, DC and experience the richness of their history by visiting and reflecting on significant monuments and museums there. During the subsequent semester, they will explore together the stories of people who experienced events memorialized in the monuments and museums.

HON 400 Honors Capstone (1) CAP
In this course, students will develop and give a presentation in which they describe one aspect of their undergraduate experience through the lens of the baccalaureate learning outcomes and performance indicators. Students and professor will meet at mutually agreeable times to report progress and/or confront challenges. Student presentations may be individual or in small groups, depending on the topic, but each student's portion of the presentation should be at least 10 minutes. Student presentations should include audio and/or visual materials, but do not need to use PowerPoint.

IDS 212 Domestic Violence (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Crosslisted PSY 212. An interdisciplinary course that looks at the issue of domestic violence from both legal and psychological perspectives and seeks to assist students to understand the complex nature of this problem. Students will explore possible solutions that utilize a combination of both disciplines.

IDS 235 History of American Protest Music (3) IDS
Music and History Interdisciplinary course. From the earliest days of the Republic to the present, ordinary people have expressed their thoughts and feelings as they lifted their voices in song. In response to taxation, slavery, war, environmental degradation, economic oppression, labor unrest, racial injustice, sexism, and much more, song has served as a "weapon of the weak." In song, people have expressed their claim to justice and mustered the courage to persist against insurmountable odds, revealing their hopes and fears, anxieties and concerns, aspirations and ideals. This course, then, will survey American history "from the bottom up" through songs of protest and complaint.

IDS 285 How the West was Won:Myth and Reality in the Creation of the American West (3) IDS
This course explores the many meanings of the American West to those who have inhabited, conquered, and imagined this fascinating region over hundreds of years, with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. From the sharpshooting of Annie Oakley to the short stories of Zane Grey, from "real lawmen" like Wyatt Earp to "real heroes" like John Wayne, this course uses literature, art, film, television, history and more-including an extended case study of the famous gunfight at the O.K. Corral-to discover how the West became more a creation of the American imagination than a place on the American map.

IDS 307 Healthy Communities (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and SOC 103
Gerontological Studies, Nursing, Social Work and Sociology Interdisciplinary Course. This course examines the practice of interdisciplinary health teams with the goal of facilitating the development of healthy individuals, families, communities, and populations. Emphasis is on applying theories and models to assess community-identified capacities and needs. Diversity of individuals, communities, and populations are explored using interactive learning strategies, thus supporting the development of partnerships among professionals and the citizens of the community.

IDS 315 Mediterranean Culture:Saracens, Knights & Infidels (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 and Sophomore Status
An interdisciplinary examination of past and present interactions among Mediterranean cultures, societies, and empires. By studying how these people represented their experiences in historical and literary texts, we will consider options for improved intercultural communication.

IDS 325 Multicultural Sicily (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): At the time of trip, Sophomore status or above
This course is an opportunity to study in depth the literary, historical, artistic, and philosophical foundations of the Middle Ages as evident in the multicultural culture/society of medieval and contemporary Sicily. Sicily is a unique place to experience this study because during the height of the Crusades, the Sicilians, under Normal rule, achieved a high level of culture by sharing the accomplishments of Jews, Muslims, Byzantine and Roman Christians in one multicultural society. This expression of multiculturalism is particularly suited to an interdisciplinary course.

IDS 350 Ghana:A Cultural Experience (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101, SOC 103, and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
This course focuses on modes of communication and traditional African religion, particularly those traditions of the Akan people of Ghana, and examines Ghanaian socio-economic and political systems. While in Ghana, students attend classes at the Catholic University College of Ghana, participate in traditional festivals, meet religious and secular dignitaries, and engage in a project for which you may earn Service Learning credit.

IDS 380A Ancient Greece (3) EXP/IDS
Prerequisite(s): 15 or more credit hours earned, at least Sophomore status and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Art and Humanities Interdisciplinary Course. Through an exciting field trip to Greece, interdisciplinary readings, examination of artifacts at archaeological sites, and hands-on discovery, this course explores the impact of ancient Greek culture on contemporary beliefs, events, and art. This study is team taught by two MSJ faculty members.

IDS 380B The Mediterranean: Ancient Egypt (3) EXP/IDS
Prerequisite(s): 15 or more credit hours earned and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Through an exciting field trip to Egypt, interdisciplinary readings, and examination of artifacts at archaeological sites, this course explores the impact of Egyptian culture-Pharonic, Coptic, and Islamic-on contemporary beliefs, society, politics, events, science, and art. This study is team taught by two MSJ faculty members.

IDS 380C The Mediterranean:Art & Science of Leonardo da Vinci (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Through examination of Leonardo da Vinci, this course thoroughly explores the man and his singular historical legacy. Specifically we assess his far ranging interdisciplinary contributions to modern scientific theory. This study is team taught by two MSJ faculty members. Research will take place in the MSJ classroom, and in Italy during a 10-day field trip. These sites have the most authentic collections of Leonardo da Vinci primary source documents in the world. Highlights will include examination of Leonardo's work in Rome, in Florence, in Vinci, and in Milan.

IDS 385 The Story of Berlin (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): 15 or more credit hours earned, sophomore status, and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Through an exciting field trip to Berlin we will explore the complex and often contentious role of this influential European capitol and the life of its people from the perspectives of history, politics, culture, religion, art and architecture. Our journey will take us from the sleepy residential town of Berlin to capitol of the Reich, Berlin under Hitler, Berlin the divided city during the cold war, to reunification in 1990, and finally to the Berlin of today, one of the most vibrant multi-cultural capitols in Europe.

IDS 392 Honduran Culture & Spirituality (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): 100 level REL and SOC 103, and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Religious Studies and Sociology Interdisciplinary Course. This course will provide students an immersion experience to study, dialogue and work side by side with Central Americans on the theological cultural, economic, ecological, political and social challenges and solutions that directly affect all our lives in the Americas.

IDS 395 History & Culture of Ireland (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): 15 or more credit hours earned, and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
This immersion course will look at the history of historical and contemporary Ireland. We will examine how both, in past and present times, art, music, literature, and theater is grounded in the saga of the Irish people. Particular attention will be paid to the influence of the struggle for Irish independence. Weekend excursions will introduce the students to "pilgrimage" and a service component is scheduled in collaboration with the Irish Christian Brothers.

IDS 397 Rome:A Sacred & Secular History (3) IDS
This 3 credit, accelerated course is designed to provide students with an on-site learning experience of the history of Rome from both a theological and secular perspective. Students will explore how Roman society developed into one of the world's greatest civilizations, and will visit important sites of Roman history such as the Forums, Colosseum, Pantheon, and Ostia Antica. Students will then study how early Christianity experienced itself within the Roman Empire, and also how the Catholic Church developed in Rome over the next two millennia. They will visit sites of importance to the Christian community in Rome such as the Basilicas of St. Peter, St. John Lateran, St. Mary Major, and St. Paul Outside the Walls; as well as the Catacomb of St. Sebastian, Church of San Clemente, and Vatican Necropolis. The travel portion of this course takes place during Spring break.

IDS 460 Japan's Contemporary Culture and its Edo Past (3)
Prerequisite(s): IDS 360
This course is an in-depth exploration of the impact of pre-modern Japan on contemporary Japanese culture, building on student experiences from IDS 360 and from their prior travel in Japan. It will include advanced assignments, interaction with students in IDS 360, and a more active leadership role during the twelve-day trip to Japan. Students will examine in detail an aspect of Japan's fine arts, history, culture, or religious beliefs from the Edo Era (1615 - 1868) to the present. They will augment their knowledge of how these forces influenced contemporary Japanese art and cultural life.

INF 120 Principles of Programming I (3)
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 185 /Equiv or placement
Gain an understanding of the basic concepts and considerations of structured and object-oriented programming methodologies and be able to apply these concepts appropriately to solve a variety of typical problems, programming in an event-driven graphical development environment including creating classes and objects.

INF 221 Principles of Programming II (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 120 or equivalent
Develop programming techniques emphasizing reliability, maintainability, and reusability. This course includes an introduction to objects, classes, and object-oriented design, incorporating encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, and abstraction. Additional topics include systems development lifecycle (SDLC), multi-dimensional arrays, exception handling, addresses, pointers, and dynamic storage allocation.

INF 230 Database Design & Development (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 120 or equivalent
This course provides an introduction to fundamental database concepts including current relational database modeling, file management, data definition, and standards. Learn to develop structured query language (SQL) statements to develop, retrieve, manipulate, and maintain data. Use complex and compound criteria from multiple tables to develop appropriate reports and perform data analysis. Also explore some contemporary non-relational databases.

INF 250 Web Fundamentals & Standards (3)
This course is designed to provide students with the fundamentals of current and proposed standards for HTML, XHTML and CSS. This course also explores web technologies, examining future directions that present opportunities for multimedia developers, examines various multimedia formats (images, audio, video, sound and animation), web standards and accessibility.

INF 255 Client-Side Scripting (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 221 and INF 250
Introduction to the Document Object Model (DOM), fundamentals of Internet application design, development, and deployment using client-side scripting language(s) and the use of external libraries such as JQuery. Further examination of various multimedia formats (images, audio, video, sound and animation).

INF 256 Server-Side Scripting (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 221 and INF 250
This course covers the configuration of web server software and the use of server-side programming. Topics include: Server-side scripting in languages such as PHP and Java Server Pages, SQL, database access and drivers, security issues, including access control and secured transmissions.

INF 270 Intro to Mobile Application Development (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 221 or equivalent
In this course, students will be introduced to the foundations of mobile development and its unique requirements and constraints. Students will create a variety of mobile applications. Requirements and design decisions tied to mobile application development and how they relate to limited resources available on mobile devices are emphasized.

INF 324 Data Structures (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 221
In-depth study of the abstract data type: its theory and implementation, study of complex data structures including trees, B-trees and graphs.

INF 325 Networks (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 221
Introduction to networking and technologies for wireless protocols and multimedia messaging services.

INF 328 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 221
This course covers techniques of abstraction and object design, design patterns, and object modeling and how to apply these concepts to web and mobile applications.

INF 331 Applied Database (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 230
This course builds on the Database Design & Development course and focuses on the creation, administration and use of databases utilizing a multi-tier application design methodology. This course assumes knowledge of database system concepts. The student will be introduced to application program development in a database environment with emphasis on setting up, modifying, and querying a database. Students will also do extensive project work writing and utilizing database stored procedures and triggers.

INF 335 Data Analytics (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 221 and INF 230
Students will develop an understanding and application of business intelligence techniques while learning data mining and decision support fundamentals and gaining an understanding of data collection, cleaning and aggregation issues. Students learn to construct meaningful multi-dimensional models, investigate data warehousing issues, utilize a data mining query language, learn statistical techniques for analyzing data, utilize decision trees in data analysis, and investigate cluster analysis.

INF 355 Advanced Client-Side Scripting (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 255
This course covers the more advanced Object-Oriented features of a client-side scripting language as well as AJAX with XML and JSON. Open source libraries such as jQuery, JQuery Mobile, and Prototype are covered with an emphasis on developing plugins for these libraries.

INF 356 Advanced Server-Side Scripting (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 256
Advanced topics for scripting in a server-side programming language. Topics covered will include object-oriented web application frameworks , Model/View/Controller (MVC) design pattern, Content Management Systems (CMS), web services, XML Schemas, SOAP (Simple Object Access Model), WSDL (Web Services Description Language), authentication, authorization, session management, PDF generation and email communication.

INF 370 Algorithms (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 324
Introduction to useful algorithms for searching, sorting and decision making; utilization of methods to quantify and classify efficiency of algorithms; probabilistic and randomized algorithms and dynamic programming. Course covers advanced algorithms on graphs, divide-and-conquer and dynamic programming, greedy methods, backtracking, branch-and-bound, computational complexity and parallel algorithms.

INF 377 Introduction to Automata (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 221
Course presents a study of formal languages. Topics include: language classes, formal definitions of grammars and acceptors, deterministic/nondeterministic systems, finite state machines, push down automata and normal forms.

INF 380 Operating Systems (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 324
Course offers an introduction to the theory and practice behind modern computer operating systems. Topics will include: computer and operating system structures, process and thread management, process synchronization and communication, memory management, virtual memory, file system, I/O subsystem and device management.

INF 391 Topics in Computing (3)
Prerequisite(s): INF 120 or equivalent and 2 other INF courses
Variable topic course with emphasis is on current trends in technology. Course may be taken up to four times (total of 12 credit hours).

INF 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (0-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A related work experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation and evaluation.

INF 400 Senior Research (1)
Prerequisite(s): Senior status or permission of instructor
Students work independently mentored by a faculty advisor on a project that demonstrates and integrates knowledge attained through previous coursework.

INF 460 Independent Study (1-3)
New Course
Selected areas of concentration for students approved by the department chairperson.

INF 496 Co-Op:Parallel(FT) (0-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A related work experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation and evaluation.

JCG 200 Disabling Theology (3) JCG
Prerequisite(s): Religion Course and SOC 103
Using a practical theological method that dialogues between theology and experience, this course explores the social injustice of ableism, as well as the search for the common good, in relationship to persons who are differently abled in body, mind, and/or psyche.

JCG 200H HON:Disabling Theology (0) JCG
Course description as stated in JCG 200 (Honors Course)

JCG 200S Serv Lrng:Disabling Theology (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 200
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 250 The Holocaust (3) JCG/IDS
This course is an exploration of the historical event called the Holocaust and its far reaching consequences. During the course, students will become familiar with what happened, move on to the question of "why", and conclude with a deeper understanding of the implications of these events for the present and future. While the Holocaust can be approached from many angles and perspectives, this course will focus much of its attention on examining questions that emerge in light of the Holocaust about ethics, the meaningful pursuit of justice, and the human capacity for both good and evil.

JCG 250H HON:The Holocaust (0) JCG/IDS
Course description as stated in JCG 250 (Honors Course)

JCG 255 Christian Social Justice (3) JCG
This course will acquaint students with both concrete efforts by Christians in support of social justice and with the Christian premises that underlie these efforts. Topics include economic justice, religious liberty and church-state relations, rights of women and minorities, war and peace, pro-life issues, and environmental ethics.

JCG 255S Serv Lrng:Christian Social Justice (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 255
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 256 Hands Up, Don't Shoot:Practical Theology for Racial Justice (3) JCG
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103 and any 100 Level Religion
This course examines the social injustices of racism and ethnocentrism from theological perspectives. Methods of practical theology are used to develop reflexive theological habits for critical analysis and social action.

JCG 256S Serv Lrng:Hands Up, Don't Shoot:Practical Theology for Racial Justice (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 256
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 266 A Land Where You Can Eat: Sustainable Foodways and Christian Spirituality (3) JCG
This course examines food production, distribution, and consumption using practical theological method. Students develop a spirituality of just food, paying special attention to social structures and individual choices that promote and/or inhibit sustainable foodways.

JCG 266S Serv Lrng:A Land Where You Can Eat:Sustainable Foodways and Christian Spirituality (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 266
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 267 Healing and Loving Creation:An Ecological Spirituality for Our Time (3) JCG
Discipleship in our modern world increasingly necessitates an ecological commitment to embrace a green lifestyle. God's fidelity to "renew the face of Earth" as a planet of peace and compassion inspires new ways of thinking about and responding to the dignity of all creation. We will consider the contemplative encounter with God in nature that compels us to embrace our potential as co-creators, loving and healing Earth.

JCG 268 Bringing about a Sustainable Reign of God (3) JCG
This course explores why we are called to live more sustainably and gives practical ways to live that are more in keeping with Gospel teaching. We will look at the signs of times in which we are now living and apply Jesus' message of love and compassion towards all of God's creation. We will also look at ways in which we can spread this message to others.

JCG 390 Appalachian Culture & Spirit (3) JCG/IDS
Prerequisite(s): 100 level REL and SOC 103, and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Crosslisted IDS 390. This course will be a field experience in the Appalachian Mountains in Kentucky and will focus on understanding Appalachian Culture and Religion. We will examine how culture affects religion, how religion affects culture, and explore how the dynamic interplay of these two can affect personal religious development, lifestyle, behavior and family, social, ecological, economic and political systems. Special attention will be focused on social analysis of the poverty in Appalachia, issues of social and environmental justice, and exploration of strategies for future sustainability in the region. The course can be taken for graduate, undergraduate, Honors and Service Learning credit. Five classroom sessions will be conducted to develop the academic learning of the experience.

JCG 390S Serv Lrng: Appalachian Culture (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 390
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 391 Cherokee Culture and Spirituality:Immersion (3) JCG/IDS
Prerequisite(s): 100 level REL and SOC 103 and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Crosslisted IDS 391. This course includes a one week trip the Cherokee Qualla Boundary in North Carolina. As a comprehensive exploration into justice and the common good students will meet with Cherokee guides who teach us about Native American life from their vantage point. We will see multi-faceted examples of how working for justice is a cornerstone of today's Cherokee.

JCG 391S Serv Lrng:Cherokee Culture (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 391
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

LCE 200 Foundations of Leadership and Civic Engagement (3)
This course examines fundamental principles of effective leadership and civic engagement. Emphasis is placed on gaining knowledge of one's own leadership tendencies and reflecting on the application of leadership concepts to the practice of leadership and engagement with others in real-world situations.

LCE 300 Leadership for the Common Good (3)
This course explores personal and collective responsibilities as citizens in service to society and the role of leadership dedicated to the growth and development of others and commitment to building value-based institutions that contribute to creating a sustainable, just, and caring society. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of local/global social problems and methods used in leading change to address them. Students will conduct a policy analysis and develop an advocacy strategy. Occasional field trips to meet with area community leaders may be scheduled during regular class meeting times.

LCE 300S Serv Lrng:Leadership for the Common Good (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): LCE 300
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

LCE 400 Leadership Theory & Ethical Practice (3)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of LCE 200 Leadership for the Common Good with a "C" or better is required for course enrollment.
This course provides an introduction to leadership theories and models. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis and practical application of classic and contemporary approaches to leadership. Leadership ethics is also examined.

LGS 150 Legal Environment (3)
An introduction to the field of law including its background and future types of positions, skills required to function as a paralegal, legal ethics, legal analysis and writing, business writing, and the legal system.

LGS 151 Legal Principles (3) S
An introduction to basic legal principles through the study of the judicial system, judicial decision making, judicial remedies, the range of law, basic theories of law, and legal reasoning.

LGS 151H HON:Legal Principles (0) S
Course description as stated in LGS 151 (Honors Course)

LGS 152 Legal Research (3)
Corequisite(s): LGS 151
An introduction to the use of research materials in the law library, including computer assisted legal research, and a familiarization with the preparation of legal memoranda.

LGS 206 Crime & Constitution (3) LAS
New Course
Crosslisted CRM 206. This course will examine various aspects of crime and criminal procedure that arise from the United States Constitution. Topics covered include search and seizure, due process, indictments, bail, punishments, double jeopardy, self- incrimination, treason, extradition, and the rights to speedy trial by jury, to confront witnesses, and to the effective assistance of counsel.

LGS 210 Business Law I (3)
Crosslisted BUS 210. The study of the nature of law and the legal system, and its application to business and the marketplace.

LGS 210S Serv Lrng:Business Law I (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): LGS 210
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

LGS 261 Business Organizations (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151 or equivalent
A review of business organizations, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. An introduction to terminology and structure and the analysis and preparation of the forms encountered by a business in its operation, with emphasis on developing a student's ability to prepare necessary documents in the corporate law area. Students will also be introduced to mergers, securities, employees, benefits, licenses, creditor's rights, taxation, and accounting.

LGS 271 Estates and Trusts (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151
An introduction to basic wills and trusts concepts and an examination of the law and procedure of preparing wills, administration of estates and general probate procedure. The drafting of wills and trusts, preparation of probate documents, filing procedures, asset collection, accounting, and closing procedures will be covered.

LGS 281 Real Estate (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151
An introduction to the law of real estate, including concepts relating to ownership, transfer and encumbrance of real estate.

LGS 289 Women's Issues and the Law (3) S
New Course
Crosslisted SOC 289. This course is about gender differences and gendered human interrelationships. Through reading and discussion of legislation, judicial opinions, and other sources, we will examine how U.S. law reflects and reinforces social and institutional arrangements that channel men and women into different roles and allocates power between them. We will also look at alternative formulations of legal concepts and at how law is made and implemented. Students should be able to develop a critical analytical approach that can be the basis for evaluating future changes in law.

LGS 291 Litigation (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151
An introduction to the federal and state court systems, initiation of a lawsuit and its procedure through the judicial system. Emphasis placed on jurisdiction, venue, discovery, theories of liability, and causes of action commonly seen in litigation.

LGS 321 US/UK Comp Law & Crim Justice (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151 or CRM 103
In this class, the student will be exposed to the law, legal process, and criminal system of the United Kingdom. The course will focus on development of the law in the United States, as it relates to the British Common Law, and compare and contrast the legal systems of these two countries. At the conclusion of this course, there will be a two-week trip to London, where students will be able to observe the British Court system.

LGS 323 Law & End of Life Issues (3)
New Course
This course will examine the growing role the judicial system in the United States is exercising in determining decisions being made in matters pertaining to end of life decisions. Topics covered will include contemporary rulings by the Supreme Court in issues of ending or sustaining life, as well as legal documents and proceedings such as guardianships, powers of attorney and advance directives (living wills, etc.)

LGS 331 Real Estate Law Practice (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 281 or equivalent
Detailed analysis and preparation of all documents related to conveyances, leases, mortgages, and other real estate transactions.

LGS 341 Litigation Practice & Procedure (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 291 or equivalent
Development of skills in investigation of cases and interviewing clients and witnesses. Preparation of pleadings and discovery devices. Coverage of trial preparation techniques.

LGS 350T Crim Law & Procedure for LGS (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151
Crosslisted CRM 350T. This course will address the basics of criminal law and criminal procedure as it relate to paralegal practice.

LGS 350W Immigration Law (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151
An overview of U.S. immigration law with a special emphasis on employment-based immigration law, including the agencies involved in formulating, interpreting and enforcing U.S. immigration laws.

LGS 350Y Bankruptcy Law (3)
New Course
This course will discuss how debt is created, voluntarily and involuntarily; how security interests in real and personal property are created and perfected; how credit ratings are determined and maintained and the restrictions on accessing credit records under the Credit Reporting Act; the various methods of collecting debt as governed by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act; how to obtain and collect a final a judgment; and how to recognize a fraudulent conveyance under the Uniform Fraudulent Conveyances Act. It will also cover the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, and case procedures under Chapters 7, 13 and 11 of the Code.7

LGS 352 International Law & Human Rights (3) LAS
New Course
This course will examine the politics of international law. We will discuss the development, enforcement, and impact of international law on international relations. We will also discuss issue areas, focusing on human rights.

LGS 354 Constitutional Law (3) S
Crosslisted PSC 354. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth study of the Constitution of the United States. Special attention will be given to the Bill of Rights and the freedoms and rights contained therein, such as the freedom of speech, due process, equal protection, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, etc.

LGS 355 Family Law (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151
Students in this course have the opportunity to learn family law and the paralegal's role in the practice of family law. Attention is given to such topics as annulments, separation, dissolution of marriage, child custody, spousal support, parental rights, surrogate birth, family violence.

LGS 356 Intellectual Property (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151
An introduction to Intellectual Property Law, addressing trademark law, copyright law, patent law, trade secrets, due diligence, and right of publicity.

LGS 373 Comparative Criminal Justice/Criminology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, additional 6 CRM hours at 200 level or Instructor/Advisor Approval
Crosslisted CRM 372. This course offers a comparative, cross-cultural perspective to the study of criminal justice systems and crime patterns worldwide.

LGS 380 Legal Aspects of Sport and Recreation (3)
New Course
Crosslisted SPM 380. Sport and recreation activities by their very nature have the potential for litigation. Familiarity with the law in these areas and the legal concepts behind the law will be discussed. Topics such as risk management, liability, crowd control, as well as tort, constitutional, and contract law will be stressed.

LGS 381 Internship Experience (3) EXP
The student works a minimum of 150 hours in a corporate legal department, law firm or other legal setting utilizing and refining skills learned in the classroom. Student must apply with the director of the Paralegal Studies program.

LGS 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

LGS 415 Law Office Practice Seminar (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 151 and LGS 152
This course is designed to prepare the paralegal student for practice in a law office environment. Students will be introduced to various types of computer software being used in today's law office. In addition, this course will address legal ethics, research, and writing.

LGS 450 Adv Legal Research (3)
Prerequisite(s): LGS 152
This course should expand the knowledge gained in Legal Research (LGS 152) with a focus on legal research, writing, analysis, evaluation, and drafting. The course goes beyond the use of research tools into developing actual research and drafting skills.

LGS 496 Co-Op:Alternatng(FT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

LIB 115 Foundations of the Liberal Arts (3)
A three-credit introduction to the history and concerns of the liberal arts, which arose in Greco-Roman antiquity when ideas about political engagement required persons educated in critical thinking and citizenship. Students will explore this history and will practice identifying and analyzing enduring complex questions that the liberal arts both shape and help to answer.

LIB 280 Conference Planning and Assistance (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Students will assist faculty with planning an academic conference, hosted at the Mount including content development, logistics, promotion, etc.

LIB 290 Research and Bibliography (0-3)
New Course
Student will assist faculty member with an existing research project, including research, indexing, bibliographical work etc.

LIB 300 Seriously Funny:The Liberal Art of Humor (3)
Prerequisite(s): 21 Hours Completed in the Major
With humor so widespread in our social world, affecting our relationships, reflecting our attitudes, influencing our politics, and used to sell us everything from Acura's to Zumba classes, having only a "sense" of humor is not enough. This seminar closely examines the phenomenon of humor, explores various motives for creating, using, and abusing it, analyzes how it is transmitted and received by diverse groups, and considers its diverse effects on the common good. By studying humor from multiple perspectives, including history, the arts, literature, economics, philosophy, politics, the media, and more, we can become more critical consumers, compassionate neighbors, and empowered citizens.

LIB 301 The Loving Friends:The Bloomsbury Group (3)
Prerequisite(s): 21 hours complete in the major
This seminar will examine the lives and works of the members of the Bloomsbury Group, a collection of artists, writers, thinkers, politicians, critics, and journalists who came to prominence in the 1910s and 1920s in London, so named for the London neighborhood in which most of them lived and worked. The Group had a profound effect on British culture, and their influence is still felt today. We will examine works by Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, John Maynard Keynes, Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Roger Fry, Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf, Desmond McCarthy, Katherine Mansfield, T. S. Eliot, Vita Sackville-West and Carrington, and will view the Group in light of its influences and predecessors, such as Matthew Arnold, Oscar Wilde, G. E. Moore, and Walter Pater. Students will be able to choose a specific Group member on whom to complete an in-depth final project.

LIB 302 Ree/al or Not Ree/al:The History of the Documentary as History (3)
Prerequisite(s): 21 Credit Hours toward Liberal Arts Major
Documentary films compel us to believe that they represent the real world as it really is. They arise from real life events that occur in real time; yet, the films, as well as the film makers, are representing an historical phenomenon by choosing who or what is presented, how it is presented, and what sources are used to support their particular re-telling of the past-much like a traditional, written history. Yet the documentary film employs powerful visual and auditory components not present in traditional, written histories to convince viewers to accept its particular point of view. Students in this seminar course will, while examining documentary film from its beginnings in the early 20th century to the present, learn the techniques used by documentarians to tell their stories. They will then analyze a series of films from the 1910's through the 21st century in order to address the overall course question.

LIB 303 Oy Vey:Contemporary Jewish Literature (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): 21 Credits Hours toward the Libral Arts Major
Many religious scholars have noted that a Jew can be many different things at once and those scholars often argue that to doubt one's faith is very Jewish thing. What does it mean to be Jewish at a time during which nearly 2/3 of Jews define themselves as more secular than religious as "Just Jewish"? In this course we will explore such a question as well as representations of cultural transformation and significant periods of Jewish experience through contemporary literature (mostly 20th and 21st century): fiction, poetry, drama, memoir, film and philosophy. This course is devoted to the cultural, the artistic, the secular and the spiritual, to the literature that reflects deeply held traditions and the literature that has been produced by those who identify as "just".

LIB 304 Addiction and the Spiritual Life (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): 21 Credit Hours toward Liberal Arts Major or Instructor Approval
This Liberal Arts Seminar will explore the reality of addiction in the 21st century. The course considers how the desires of people and societies can lead to unhealthy forms of addiction. These pathological relationships can be analyzed with resources related to scientific, theological, and philosophical perspectives. Students will therefore study the phenomenon of addiction in an interdisciplinary way in order to discern how addiction is intimately connected to the anthropological universal of ultimate meaning and purpose in life.

LIB 304H HON: Addiction and the Spiritual Life (0)
New Course
Course description as stated in LIB 304 (Honors Course)

LIB 304S Serv Lrng: Addiction and the Spiritual Life (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): LIB 304
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

LIB 305 Aesthetics:The Philosophy of Beauty (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): 21 Hours toward the Liberal Arts Major
This course analyzes the concept of beauty through a philosophical lens. This analysis involves considering the definition of beauty from multiple perspectives including artistic, historical, and scientific views. Contrast concepts such as ugliness and the sublime will also be considered.

LIB 390 America at Play:Baseball, Bare Knuckles, and Back Seats (3)
This seminar examines American society and culture through an exploration of the history of sports, recreation, and leisure. An emphasis is placed upon how these activities affect class identity, gender construction, and race relations. The impact of an emerging mass consumer society is also explored.

LIB 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

LIB 400 Liberal Arts Culminating Experience (3)
Prerequisite(s): Six Hours of Liberal Arts Seminar Coursework
The culminating course is designed to demonstrate the student's strong command of the learning outcomes and performance indicators associated with the Liberal Arts major. Working closely with peers and a faculty scholar, the student will compose a research question of significance and depth, conduct research and apply critical analysis from across the Liberal Arts in addressing the question, craft a twelve-to-fifteen-page paper presenting his or her findings, and articulate those findings to the wider University community.

MCE 200 Special Topics (3)
New Course
In alignment with Ohio's Learning Standards in Social Studies in grades four through nine, this course will explore the history of Ohio and the field of economics. The first part of the course will analyze and interpret significant historical events, perspectives, patterns and themes in the history of Ohio. The customs, traditions, and needs of Ohio's various cultural groups will be examined. The remainder of the course will cover principles of economics, including microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, consumer economics, and personal finance.

MCE 300 Intro Middle School (3)
Prerequisite(s): EDU 190 and EDU 217
This course is focused on best teaching practices to complement the development, needs and learning processes of students in grades 4 through 9. The course provides teaching theory and practices designed to elicit personalized, active student learning complimentary to adolescents' physical, cognitive, affective, emotional/psychological, moral /ethical, and social development. The course includes a component where participants review the research literature for best practices used within their two content areas. The course will include applying theory to practice through the planning of instruction, selection of teaching strategies, ethics, classroom management, multiculturalism, inclusion, diversity and motivation.

MCE 333 MCE Ed Content Practicum (2)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School, MCE 300, EDU 217, EDU 207
Corequisite(s): Two of the Following: EDU 355, EDU 383, EDU 384, EDU 386
This 100 hour field experience is designed to give the MCE student an opportunity to work with middle school level students in their two areas of concentration. Teaching activities as designated by the instructor and/or content area methods specialist will be assigned in order to apply theory learned in prior course work. Within each area of concentration, students will teach a minimum of four lessons in the classroom, with scheduled mentor teacher and Mount supervisor evaluations. The candidate is required to attend their assigned placement a minimum of two times per week throughout the semester, with seminars back on campus. The overall goal of the course is to prepare students for student teaching.

MCE 444 MCE Student Teaching (12)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and Permission from Clinical Experience Director
An intensive all day experience for 15 weeks in a parochial, private or public middle grades/school (grades 4-9). Students in the Middle Childhood program will complete their student teaching either by working in both content areas simultaneously across the 15 weeks or by spending seven weeks in one concentration and eight weeks in the other. The middle level preprofessional will be supervised in his/her student teaching experience by both practicing licensed teacher(s) in his/her concentration areas and by qualified university personnel.

MGT 300 Management/Org Behavior (3)
Examine the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to lead and participate effectively in organizations. Emphasis will be on the functions of management (planning, organizing, leading, controlling), on understanding the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations (perception, motivation, group dynamics), and the impact of technology on organizations.

MGT 300H HON:Management/Org Behavior (0)
Course description as stated in MGT 300 (Honors Course)

MGT 300S Serv Lrng:Mgmt & Organiz Behav (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): MGT 300
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MGT 310 Human Resource Management (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
Explores topics involving the management of people including recruitment selection, interviewing, testing, training, job analysis and design, salary and benefits, laws, discipline, and grievances. Also included are topics such as multicultural diversity, Family Leave Policy, quality management, Americans With Disabilities Act and other issues.

MGT 325 Project Management (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300, CIS 300, BUS 352
Crosslisted CIS 325. A Comprehensive overview of the elements of modern project management, guidelines for success, and related tools. Dimensions and elements of project management, concepts, methodologies, strategies, and structures will be examined.

MGT 330 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 and either MGT 300 or 6 additional hours of PSY
Crosslisted PSY 330. Provides a survey of the field of industrial/organizational psychology. The student will learn about the principles, practices, and psychological knowledge that guide the activities of industrial/organizational psychologists. Examines the industrial side of I/O psychology (human resources activities such as job analysis, selection, training, and performance evaluation) and the organizational side (the behavior of people in organizations including topics such as motivation, job satisfaction, and leadership).

MGT 332 Operations Management (3)
Prerequisite(s): MTH 174 or MTH 176
This course examines operations necessary in the production of a good or service. Topics include quality planning and control, scheduling, inventory management, and product and process design. The student will learn to identify the decisions which must be made in operations management and will study the tools and methods needed.

MGT 335 Understanding Quality Management (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
This course examines the role quality plays in today's workplace. IT surveys major approaches to quality, quality management concepts, tools, and the major approaches of Deming, Juran, and others. Systems thinking, continuous improvement, and customer value strategy are emphasized.

MGT 335H HON:Understanding Quality Management (0)
Course description as stated in MGT 335 (Honors Course)

MGT 370 Labor Relations (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
Studies the historical and contemporary roles played by management and union. Historical and current legal framework is considered in shaping the relationships. Case study and a bargaining simulation are used to provide experiences which demonstrate aspects of the relationship.

MGT 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

MGT 453 Current Topics in Management (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
Crosslisted MKT 453. Covers selected topics in management. May be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

MGT 460 Seminar in Human Resources (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300, MGT 310
An in-depth study of selected personnel topics. This course may be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

MGT 461 Leadership & Politics of Power (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
The study of various aspects of leader/follower transactions as a basis for understanding the political power structure of organizations with its implications for management, design and performance.

MGT 480 Group Dynamics & Team Building (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300
Provides a unique opportunity to study team development and characteristics while also exploring interpersonal issues and personal feelings in group involvement. This course increases one's effectiveness as a team member and provides explanations of the leader's role in initiating, building and maintaining teams. The course teaches management of conflict between and within groups and decision making and problem-solving styles.

MGT 490 Seminar in Management (1-3)
The course covers selected management topics in depth

MGT 492 People in Organizations (3) LAS
New Course
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or MGT 300
Crosslisted PSY 420. This course explores individual, group and organizational processes to increase understanding of self and others in organizations. Emphasizes awareness, self-development, and self-management in the context of organizational issues such as conflict resolution, team performance, and leadership.

MGT 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

MKT 300 Principles of Marketing (3)
Explores the marketing concept of customer orientation focusing on product development, pricing, distribution, promotion, and achievement of organizational objectives.

MKT 311 Principles of Retailing (3)
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300
Conventional department stores, discount department stores, variety stores, etc., are examined in the context of the "retail revolution." Buying methods, pricing, management merchandising techniques, store locations and equipment, sales promotion, customer service, and data processing are among topics discussed.

MKT 311S Principles of Retailing (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): MKT 311
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MKT 351 Marketing Communication Management (3)
Students study the theory and practice of managing public relations and advertising activities in small to medium sized firms. They develop appropriate techniques and problem solving skills by applying course material in case studies and simulations.

MKT 356 Advertising (3)
The course is a survey of the principles and practices of advertising. It covers the social and economic significance of advertising, its relation to business organization, the importance of an advertising plan, the preparation of advertisements, and the selection of media. No prerequisites. COM 200 and MKT 300 recommended.

MKT 356S Advertising (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): MKT 356
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MKT 357 Professional Selling (3)
Presents a behavioral approach to persuasion in the business transaction. The social and psychological elements of effective communication are emphasized. Individual and group presentations will be evaluated.

MKT 357S Serv Lrng:Professional Selling (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): MKT 375
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MKT 365 Consumer Behavior (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300
Examines consumer behavior, broadly defined, from the perspectives of consumer psychology and marketing. Psychological theories and concepts are used to understand our behaviors as consumers and the application of psychological theories and concepts in developing effective marketing strategies.

MKT 365S Serv Lrng: Consumer Behavior (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): MKT 365
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MKT 371 International Marketing (3)
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300
Develops competency in evaluating and applying concepts essential to the executive operating in an international environment; describes international trade, customs in both the global and multinational marketplace, legalities, and advertising techniques.

MKT 371H HON: International Marketing (0)
Course description as stated in MKT 371 (Honors Course)

MKT 392 Direct Marketing (3)
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300
Provides students with an overview of how direct marketing is an integral part of an organization's total marketing program. All aspects of direct marketing are surveyed, from decision making to customer segmentation to the media and creative elements of direct marketing and promotion.

MKT 392S Serv Lrng:Direct Marketing (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): MKT 392
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MKT 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

MKT 415 Marketing Research (3)
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300 and MTH 174 or MTH 176
Emphasizes the role of market research in marketing management. It includes planning research design, observation, experiment, and simulation. It also covers the execution of survey design: questionnaire construction, sample design, interviewing, tabulation, analysis, interpretation of results, and presentation.

MKT 420 Marketing Management (3)
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300
Provides an understanding of the administration and the management of the marketing function including the treatment of marketing planning and strategy.

MKT 420S Serv Lrng:Marketing Management (1) EXP
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MKT 453 Current Topics in Marketing (3)
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300
Crosslisted MGT 453. Covers selected topics in marketing. May be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

MKT 490 Seminar in Marketing (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300 and permission of instructor
Examines selected marketing topics in-depth through readings and group discussion. May be repeated more than once based on the specific contents of the course with advisor's permission.

MKT 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

MTH 097 Introductory and Intermediate Algebra (4)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): Placement
Operations with signed numbers, simplifying expressions; order of operations; solving linear equations and inequalities; graphing of linear equations and inequalities; solving systems of equations; polynomials; exponents; roots and radicals; factoring; solving quadratic equations.

MTH 098 Intermediate Algebra (3)
Prerequisite(s): Placement
Simplifying expressions; order of operations; solving linear equations and inequalities; graphing of linear equations and inequalities; solving systems of equations; polynomials; exponents, roots and radicals; solving quadratic equations.

MTH 099 Intermediate Algebra-CalculusTrk (3)
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 097 or MTH 098/Equiv or placement
Rational expressions and equations; quadratic, radical, polynomial and absolute value equations; linear, nonlinear and absolute value inequalities; functions - graphs, inverses, transformations; quadratic, polynomial and rational functions.

MTH 170 A Liberal Arts View of Math (3) MA/CMA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 097 or MTH 098/Equiv or placement
This course is designed to enhance students' mastery of the mathematics encountered in everyday life. These skills will foster a student's ability to make good life decisions and to be a good citizen. Topics will include interpreting commonly-encountered statistics, decision-making in health and social science issues and the mathematics of chance. Financial mathematics will also be explored including personal budgeting, investing, credit and loans.

MTH 174 Statistics I (3) MA/CMA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or Better in MTH 097 or MTH 098/Equiv or Placement
Introductory level college statistics course; Topics will include data collection; graphical representation; measurements and interpretation of univariate and bivariate data; basic concepts of probability; continuous distributions; hypothesis testing.

MTH 174S Serv Lrng:Statistics I (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): MTH 174
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MTH 180 Math for Business (3) MA/CMA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 097 or MTH 098/Equiv or placement
Application of linear functions; matrices and their use in solving systems of equations; geometric and simplex method for linear programming; mathematics of finance.

MTH 185 Precalculus (3) MA/CMA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 099 or placement
Comprehensive study of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions along with properties, graphs and applications.

MTH 190 Concepts of Calculus (3) MA/CMA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 185 or placement
Functions; limits and continuity; differentiation and applications of differentiation; logarithmic and exponential functions; integration and applications of integration.

MTH 193 Calculus I (4) MA/CMA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 185/Equiv or placement
Differential calculus, limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of the derivative, antiderivatives, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite and indefinite integrals, numerical integration.

MTH 194 Calculus II (4) MA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 193 or "4" or higher on AP Calc AB
Techniques of integration, applications of integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor series and polynomials, binomial series, polar coordinates, parametric equations.

MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 190 or MTH 193
Most, if not all, of the math classes you've taken up to now have focused on computation and problem solving. This class is intended as a transition to more abstract mathematics, so the emphasis will be on theory, critical thinking and the ability to communicate mathematically. The topics covered will include but are not limited to propositional and predicate logic; methods of proof, sequences, recursion, recurrence relations, set theory, functions, relations, graphs and counting.g.

MTH 255 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 193
Corequisite(s): MTH 194
Vectors, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, and related applications.

MTH 293 Calculus III (4) MA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 194 or "4" or higher on AP Calc BC
Functions of several variables, vectors, lines and planes, vector functions, 3D parametric curves, partial derivatives and applications, gradients and directional derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem and Divergence Theorem .

MTH 301 Mathematical Modeling (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): INF 120
Modeling techniques to solve problems from fields such as natural sciences, social sciences, business, and engineering; applications of general problem-solving strategies and fundamental modeling techniques to support future studies or work in mathematics-dependent fields.

MTH 305 College Geometry (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): MTH 220, junior or senior level or permission of instructor
Study of geometry from different perspectives, including Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, and other assorted topics; use of current geometry software; survey of the history of geometry.

MTH 310 Differential Equations (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): MTH 194 or INF 120.
First and second order ordinary differential equations having constant coefficients; linear systems; non-homogeneous equations using determined coefficients; applications.

MTH 315 Number Theory (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): MTH 220
Study of relations between and among integers; including divisibility, primes, unique factorization, congruence, primitive roots, and indices; Diophantine equations and Fibonacci numbers; selected historical topics.

MTH 320 Probability/Statistics (4) MA
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MTH 193
Corequisite(s): MTH 194
Descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, sampling, estimation, and combinatorics.

MTH 325 Numerical Analysis (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): MTH 255
Numerical differential and integration; measures of accuracy; sources of error and error analysis; solutions of non-linear equations by iterative processes; differential equations; functional approximation; initial value problems; applications.

MTH 361 Abstract Algebra (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): MTH 220
Abstract algebraic structures and their application; group and group isomorphism and homomorphisms; rings and fields; historical references.

MTH 361S Serv Lrng:Abstract Algebra (1) EXP
Corequisite(s): MTH 361
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MTH 391 Advanced Calculus (3) MA
Prerequisite(s): MTH 220 and MTH 293
This course studies the foundations of calculus, including convergence, limits, sequences and series of real numbers and functions, continuity, differentiation, and Riemann integrals.

MTH 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220, MTH 220
Opportunity for students to work in an area to which mathematics is applied such as computers, statistics, business, or actuarial science. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

MTH 400 Senior Research (1)
Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of mathematics above MTH 193
(1 credit per semester taken in two semesters). Students work independently mentored by a faculty advisor on a topic that integrates mathematics learned in previous courses.

MTH 460 Independent Study (1-3)
Selected areas of concentration for students approved by the department chairperson.

MTH 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220, MTH 220
Opportunity for students to work in an area to which mathematics is applied such as computers, statistics, business, or actuarial science. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

MUS 000R Repertoire Class (0)
This is a class in which the music majors perform for one another in preparation for the public recital. Students research and deliver a verbal Program Notes as part of the performance and receive comments from faculty members. Attendance and participation is required for music majors.

MUS 000S Serv Lrng:Repertoire Class (1) EXP
Corequisite(s): MUS 000R
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

MUS 101 Theory Fundamentals (3)
Studies in basic musicianship. Development of skills in clef reading, pitch identification, interval identification, basic melody writing and elementary harmonic analysis.

MUS 105 Piano I (3)
Designed to teach piano basics in a useful and enjoyable manner. Students will experience a wide range of repertoire, 2-hand playing, left hand chord accompaniment with a melody, experience with various piano styles, and playing in an ensemble. Optional supplementary music will be provided each week for students wishing to learn more contemporary "pop" songs. Practice pianos are available.

MUS 106 Piano II (3)
Prerequisite(s): MUS 105
The following areas of piano skills will be covered: chord progressions, harmonization, harmonization with two-hand accompaniments, improvisation, transposition, sight reading, repertoire, technique.

MUS 110E University Singers (1) MU
The University Singers is a choral performance class which performs a variety of choral music from all musical periods and styles. Both mixed (SATB) and women's (SSA) choral music will be prepared during the class time frame. There are no prerequisites and enrollment is open to all MSJ students. The group performs one concert per semester and is occasionally featured at various university functions.

MUS 113 Aural Skills (3)
Development of skills in sight singing, rhythmic reading, and melodic/harmonic and rhythmic dictation.

MUS 117 Class Guitar (1)
New Course
This course provides the beginner guitarist with the fundamentals needed to read music, gain facility in playing and strumming chords, perform basic songs, and understand basic music theory. Each week students will meet to review and perform the previous weeks assignment in a group setting with some individual performance expected.

MUS 120F University Band (1) MU
The University Band is open to all wind, brass, and percussion instrumentalists, by director approval. Drawing from the wide variety of traditional and contemporary band literature, the ensemble performs two concerts in the University Theatre each semester, as well as other on and off campus events. This Ensemble provides students with the opportunity to rehearse and perform high quality repertoire with emphasis on individual and group musical improvement. Open to all music majors and non-music majors.

MUS 120K Orchestra (1) MU
Open to all strings and other orchestral instruments as needed, music majors and non-music majors, by director's approval (director approval requires an audition). The Orchestra performs standard symphonic literature and "pops" orchestral repertoire. Members of the orchestra will develop a deeper sensitivity not only toward outstanding musicianship, but also to historical style, performance practices, aesthetics, discipline, and professionalism. Students do not need to take this course for credit to participate.

MUS 120N Lab Band (1)
The Lab Band is open to all instrumental musicians. The ensemble serves music majors as a learning laboratory for secondary instruments, and new instrumentalists as a chance to learn an instrument. All standard instruments may be accommodated, though contacting the director is encouraged.

MUS 131 World Music (3) CAM/IDS
A survey of the diversity of musical cultures. Emphasis will be devoted to music/musicians of Africa, North and South America, Eastern Europe, India, Indonesia, China, and Japan.

MUS 140 Piano (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. For non-music majors who are interested in taking piano lessons as an elective (no prerequisite).

MUS 140A Piano (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. For piano majors and very serious non-music majors. Audition required.

MUS 140P Piano and Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 141 Organ (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Preparatory studies: Regatz, Peeters and Gleason. A substantial repertoire of Bach, Mendelssohn, Franck, Dupre, and other composers representative of the Baroque period through the 20th century.

MUS 141A Organ (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction.

MUS 143A Jazz Piano (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies in jazz piano styles and repertoire.

MUS 143P Jazz Piano & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 150 Voice (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Principles of method and style periods. Uniform breath management, resonance, focus, and diction mark a beginning upon which may be built a stable and fluent technique.

MUS 150A Voice (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Principles of method and style periods. Uniform breath management, resonance, focus, and diction mark a beginning upon which may be built a stable and fluent technique.

MUS 150B Voice (3)

MUS 150D Voice & Pedagogy (1)
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 150P Voice & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 160 Violin (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Technical facility in scales, arpeggios and violin studies. Baroque, Classical and Romantic concerti and sonatas and contemporary music.

MUS 160A Violin (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Technical facility in scales, arpeggios and violin studies. Baroque, Classical and Romantic concerti and sonatas and contemporary music.

MUS 160P Violin & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 161 Viola (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Technical requirements: major, minor scales and arpeggios. Studies by Kruetzer, Sitt, Rode, and Campagnoli; concerti by Handel, Mozart and Deberiot; sonatas by Brahms and Reger.

MUS 161A Viola (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction.

MUS 161P Viola & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 162 Cello (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. To study the techniques and musical skills for playing the Cello.

MUS 162A Cello (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. To study the techniques and musical skills for playing the Cello.

MUS 162P Cello & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor

MUS 163P Bass & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 164 Guitar (1)
Weekly 30 minute private instruction. Technical facility in scales, arpeggios and selected studies. Emphasis on contemporary guitar techniques.

MUS 164A Guitar (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Technical facility in scales, arpeggios and selected studies. Emphasis on contemporary guitar techniques.

MUS 164P Guitar & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor. Emphasis on contemporary guitar.

MUS 165 Classical Guitar (1)
New Course
Weekly half-hour private instruction. Emphasis on Classical Guitar

MUS 165A Classical Guitar (1.5)
New Course
Weekly one hour private instruction. Emphasis on Classical Guitar.

MUS 165P Guitar & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 167A Jazz Double Bass (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies in jazz double bass styles and repertoire.

MUS 167P Double Bass & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 170 Harp (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Technical studies, etudes, preludes, orchestral, and ensemble parts from Salzedo, Naderman, Vito, David. Original works and transcriptions from composers of classical, romantic and modern periods.

MUS 170A Harp (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Technical studies, etudes, preludes, orchestral, and ensemble parts from Salzedo, Naderman, Vito, David. Original works and transcriptions from composers of classical, romantic and modern periods.

MUS 170P Harp & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 180 Flute & Piccolo (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies by Kohler, Anderson, Altes, Karg-Elert, JeanJean. Representative works by Handel, Bach, Mozart, Schubert, Debussy, other French composers. Prokofiev, Berio and other 20th century composers.

MUS 180A Flute & Piccolo (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies by Kohler, Anderson, Altes, Karg-Elert, JeanJean. Representative works by Handel, Bach, Mozart, Schubert, Debussy, other French composers. Prokofiev, Berio and other 20th century composers.

MUS 180P Flute, Piccolo & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 181 Clarinet (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies by Klose, Rose, Perier, JeanJean, Jetti. Representative works by Schumann, Von Weber, Mozart, Brahms, Stravinsky, and others. Single reed making and adjusting.

MUS 181A Clarinet (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies by Klose, Rose, Perier, JeanJean, Jetti. Representative works by Schumann, Von Weber, Mozart, Brahms, Stravinsky, and others. Single reed making and adjusting.

MUS 181P Clarinet & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 182 Saxophone (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Open to all students. This course will include discussion and understanding music fundamentals, and building a foundation for saxophone performance in any style.

MUS 182A Saxophone (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Open to music majors. Primary focus will be performance of standard repertoire, scales and etudes. Pedagogy, professional expectations, and equipment will also be discussed.

MUS 182P Saxophone & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 183 Oboe (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies by Barret, Ferling, Andraud, Labate, Bleuzet. Representative works by Dittersdorf, Marcello, Handel, Telemann, Schumann, Mozart, Vivaldi. Double reed making and adjusting.

MUS 183A Oboe (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies by Barret, Ferling, Andraud, Labate, Bleuzet. Representative works by Dittersdorf, Marcello, Handel, Telemann, Schumann, Mozart, Vivaldi. Double reed making and adjusting.

MUS 183P Oboe & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 184 Bassoon (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies by Weissenborn, Milde, Bitsch. Representative works by Wolf-Ferrari, Elgar, Mozart, Von Weber, Vivaldi, Bach. Double reed making and adjusting.

MUS 184A Bassoon (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies by Weissenborn, Milde, Bitsch. Representative works by Wolf-Ferrari, Elgar, Mozart, Von Weber, Vivaldi, Bach. Double reed making and adjusting.

MUS 184P Bassoon & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 185A Jazz Saxophone (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Open to all students who want to study the saxophone in relation to Jazz styles and repertoire. Studies will be based on building saxophone performance skills. These will be aided by listening, transcription, performance, and theory.

MUS 185P Jazz Saxophone & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 190 Trumpet (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies by St. Jacome, Charles, Clarke, Maxime-Alphonse, and Pietzsch. Representative solo literature by Haydn, Mozart, Faure, Hindemith, Clarks, Sowerby, and other 20th century composers.

MUS 190A Trumpet (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies by St. Jacome, Charles, Clarke, Maxime-Alphonse, and Pietzsch. Representative solo literature by Haydn, Mozart, Faure, Hindemith, Clarks, Sowerby, and other 20th century composers.

MUS 190P Trumpet & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 191 French Horn (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies by Kopprasch, Huth, Maxime-Alphonse, and Hauser. Representative solo literature by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Hindemith, Bassett, Jacob, and other 20th century composers.

MUS 191A French Horn (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies by Kopprasch, Huth, Maxime-Alphonse, and Hauser. Representative solo literature by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Hindemith, Bassett, Jacob, and other 20th century composers.

MUS 191P French Horn & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 192 Trombone/Baritone (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies by Blume, Vobaron, Paudert, and Blazhevich. Representative solo literature by Bach, Gaubert, De La Lux, Saint-Saens, Coker, Blazhevich, other 20th century composers, and appropriate selections from the literature for bassoon and violoncello.

MUS 192A Trombone/Baritone (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction.

MUS 192P Trombone/Baritone & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 193 Tuba (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies by Blume, Slama, Bell, and Gregoriev. Representative solo literature by Bach (Bell), Frankfkiser, Rossini (Hume), Persichetti, Martelli, Beversdorf, Williams, other 20th century composers, and appropriate selections from the literature for trombone, bassoon and violoncello.

MUS 193A Tuba (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies by Blume, Slama, Bell, and Gregoriev. Representative solo literature by Bach (Bell), Frankfkiser, Rossini (Hume), Persichetti, Martelli, Beversdorf, Williams, other 20th century composers, and appropriate selections from the literature for trombone, bassoon and violoncello.

MUS 193P Tuba & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 194A Jazz Trumpet (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies in jazz trumpet styles and repertoire.

MUS 194P Jazz Trumpet & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 195 Percussion (1)
Weekly half hour private instruction. Studies in the representative literature of snare drum, timpani, keyboard percussion, multiple percussion, accessories, drum set and world percussion. Includes discussion and instruction in the technical, physical, musical, and logistical factors in preparing music for solo, chamber, and large ensemble performance settings.

MUS 195A Percussion (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies in the representative literature of snare drum, timpani, keyboard percussion, multiple percussion, accessories, drum set and world percussion. Includes discussion and instruction in the technical, physical, musical, and logistical factors in preparing music for solo, chamber, and large ensemble performance settings.

MUS 195P Percussion and Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 196A Jazz Trombone (1.5)
Weekly one hour private instruction. Studies in jazz trombone styles and repertoire.

MUS 196P Jazz Trombone & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 197A Jazz Drums (1.5)
Studies in jazz drum styles and repertoire

MUS 197P Jazz Drums & Pedagogy (0.5)
Prerequisite(s): Approval by Instructor
This course will provide time for intensive study and analysis of pedagogical methods and graded repertoire of the area of study (as indicated by national teaching associations) through the support and resources of the instructor.

MUS 212 American Popular Music: From Minstrelsy to MP3 (3) MU/CAM
This course is intended to help you think creatively and critically about popular music. We will study the most significant styles of American music in chronological order, beginning with the roots and continuing through the present day. We will explore several recurring themes throughout the course: (1) The interaction of European American, African American, and Latin American traditions; (2) The influence of mass media and technology (printing, recording, radio, video, Internet); (3) The role of popular music as a symbol of identity (race, class, gender, generation).

MUS 213 Church Music and Worship (3)
New Course
This course will provide musicians with the skills and knowledge to plan, prepare and lead music for worship. From Catholic ritual to Contemporary worship, discover why music is the core element of the Christian celebration, and learn to implement these skills in a church setting.

MUS 233 Listen to This:Musical Masterworks from the Middle Ages to 1750 (3) MU/CAM
The great composers and their works in context: personal, artistic, philosophical, social, economic and religious backgrounds and circumstances. From the beginnings to 1750.

MUS 234 Listen to This:Musical Masterworks from 1750 to Present (3) MU/CAM
The great composers and their works in context: personal, artistic, philosophical, social, economic, and religious backgrounds and circumstances. From 1750 to the 21st Century.

MUS 246 Mus Exp For Young Children (3) MU/CAM
Music and music making in childhood with particular focus on developmentally appropriate experiences in pre-kindergarten and child care/preschool settings as well as for the K-3 grades. For early childhood education and special education majors.

MUS 308 Music Theory (3)
Prerequisite(s): MUS 101, MUS 113
Further studies in basic musicianship. Development of skills in counterpoint, recognition of cadences, non-harmonic tones, seventh chords, secondary dominants, modulations, extended chromatic harmony, and early 20th C. styles.

MUS 333M Practica (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 205 or EDU 307
Crosslisted EDU 333M. The field experience is the central component of this course. The student will be assigned to placements in area schools for a total of 100 field hours and he/she will also attend on campus seminars per the Syllabus. Teaching activities as designated by the content area methods specialist will be assigned in order to apply theory learned in prior course work. University supervisors will coordinate with the content area methods specialist.

MUS 343 Methods of Music I (3)
Strategies, models, methodologies for guiding the musical needs and experiences of children age pre-school through grade 6. Music teaching/learning will incorporate Kodaly, Orff and Dalcroze theories, multiculturalism and the use of music technology. For music majors. Field experience.

MUS 344 Methods of Music II (3)
Instructional strategies and resources for developmentally appropriate music for learners from grade 7 through age 21. Areas of vocal, instrumental and general music will encompass teaching methodologies and models of curriculum integration. Resources will include those of multiculturalism and technological advance. For music majors. Field experience.

MUS 350 Special Topics (1-3)
Independent study courses. Topics are determined according to student needs.

MUS 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A music related work experience supervised by music faculty in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, evaluation of work performance and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

MUS 402 Music Literature (3)
Prerequisite(s): MUS 233, MUS 234
Survey of compositional and performance styles of significant composers from the Middle Ages to the present. Extensive live and recorded listening experiences with emphasis on score analysis. Required of all music majors.

MUS 402H HON: Music Literature (0)
Course description as stated in MUS 402 (Honors Course)

MUS 403 Conducting/Orchestration/ Arranging (3)
Basic conducting patterns and conducting techniques for vocal and instrumental ensembles will be addressed. The course will also focus on score reading preparation, rehearsal techniques, repertoire selection, and writing for small ensembles.

MUS 403A Conducting/Orchestration/ Arranging (0.5-3)
Basic conducting patterns and conducting techniques for vocal and instrumental ensembles will be addressed. The course will also focus on score reading preparation, rehearsal techniques, repertoire selection, and writing for small ensembles.

MUS 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A music related work experience supervised by music faculty in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, evaluation of work performance and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

NUR 100 Health Promotion (3)
In this course, students explore the concept of health promotion in terms of exercise, sleep, stress, self-concept, with an emphasis on nutrition. The health-illness continuum is examined, with a focus on strategies that promote health and well-being in today's health care system. Throughout the course, students perform a variety of assessments and design an individualized health and wellness plan for self or others.

NUR 205 Health Assessment Across the Lifespan (3)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 198/198A, CHE 104/104A, PSY 103, SOC 103, NUR 100
Corequisite(s): NUR 210/210A/210C
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 205A
This course presents the art and science of assessing the health of clients across the lifespan. The content addresses the purpose and method of obtaining a comprehensive holistic client database using a nursing assessment model. The use of effective communication techniques to obtain assessment data is addressed. Deviations in health patterns are identified by comparing assessment data to norms, standards and theories. Assessment findings are documented in a manner appropriate for an interdisciplinary health care community.

NUR 205A Health Assessment Across the Lifespan-Lab (0)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 198/198A, CHE 104/104A, PSY 103, SOC 103, NUR 100
Corequisite(s): NUR 210/210A/210c
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 205
Course description as stated in NUR 205

NUR 207 Population-Focused Primary Health Care Nursing (4)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 220/220C, NUR 317/317A, BIO 301
Corequisite(s): NUR 360/360C, NUR 430
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 207C
This course explores the role and responsibilities of the professional nurse beyond the acute care setting and into the global community. The focus is on promoting health in communities, examining the health care system to advocate for clients, and utilizing epidemiological principles to understand global health risks. Students begin to use the nursing process to plan culturally sensitive care that addresses a variety of aggregate health concerns such as violence, poverty, homelessness, and communicable diseases.

NUR 207C Population-Focused Primary Health Care Nursing-Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 207
This course explores the role and responsibilities of the professional nurse beyond the acute care setting and into the global community. The focus is on promoting health in communities, examining the health care system to advocate for clients, and utilizing epidemiological principles to understand global health risks. Students begin to use the nursing process to plan culturally sensitive care that addresses a variety of aggregate health concerns such as violence, poverty, homelessness, and communicable diseases.

NUR 210 Foundations Patient-Centered Nursing Care (5)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 198/198A, CHE 104/104A, PSY 103, SOC 103, NUR 100
Corequisite(s): NUR 205/205A, BIO 215/215A, PSY 204
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 210A/210C
This course introduces the student to the foundations of the art and science of nursing. The evolution of professional nursing and the history of health care are explored as the basis for the practice of patient-centered nursing care. The concepts fundamental to professional nursing such as nursing process, ethics, legalities, human diversity, and communication are emphasized. Application of the concepts and content fundamental to the practice of nursing is addressed in an on-campus skills laboratory and in clinical settings in the community.

NUR 210A Foundations of Patient-Centered Nursing Care - Lab (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 210/210C
Course description as stated in NUR 210

NUR 210C Foundations of Patient-Centered Nursing Care - Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 210/210A
Course description as stated in NUR 210

NUR 220 Medical-Surgical Nursing I: Common/Chronic Conditions (6)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 205/205A, NUR 210/210A/210C, BIO 215/215A, PSY 204
Corequisite(s): BIO 301, NUR 317/317A
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 220A/220C
This course builds on the concepts introduced in Foundations of Patient Centered Nursing Care. The focus is the health promotion, health maintenance and illness/disease management for individuals experiencing common/chronic health conditions. Critical thinking skills are enhanced as evidence-based practice is presented and discussed when planning care. Clinical experiences allow students to develop caring relationships, and use therapeutic communication, collaboration, assessment and developmentally appropriate interventions as they provide patient-centered care. Other concepts integrated throughout the course include ethics, legalities, professional role, information literacy, health care technology and human diversity.

NUR 220A Medical-Surgical Nursing I: Common/Chronic Conditions-Lab (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 220/220C
Course description as stated in NUR 220

NUR 220C Medical-Surgical Nursing I: Common/Chronic Conditions- Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 220/220A
Course description as stated in NUR 220

NUR 307 Biostatistics (3)
Introduction to Biostatistics Provides an introduction to selected important topics in biostatistical concepts and reasoning. This course represents an introduction to the field and provides a survey of data and data types. Specific topics include tools for describing central tendency and variability in data; methods for performing inference on population means and proportions via sample data; statistical hypothesis testing and its application to group comparisons; issues of power and sample size in study designs; and random sample and other study types. While there are some formulae and computational elements to the course, the emphasis is on interpretation and concepts.

NUR 309 Cultural Immersion for Health Care Providers (1-3)
This course is a field experience in a culturally-rich community. The location may occur in a foreign country or in a location within the United States. Students will interact with healthcare providers and patients/families with the focus on understanding their culture beliefs as they relate to health care. Students will examine how culture, religion, social systems and lifestyle affect their belief of health and health care.

NUR 315 Nursing Prof Role (3)
Prerequisite(s): Registered nurse
NUR 315 is designed to facilitate the transition of the registered nurse to the role of registered nurse student seeking the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Course content focuses on the development of professional nursing in the United States. The student's personal and professional philosophy and roles are explored in relationship to the image of nursing. Nursing process and nursing theory are taught as two approaches that guide nursing practice.

NUR 317 Pharmacology and Medication Administration (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 205/205A, NUR 210/210A, BIO 215/215A
Corequisite(s): BIO 301, NUR 220/220A/220C
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 317A
This course explores basic mechanisms of drug action, indications and contraindications of drug therapy. Nursing interventions related to dosage, therapeutic effects as well as toxic and expected side effects of various medications. Emphasis will focus on the care of clients receiving medication across the life span and in culturally and socioeconomically diverse settings. Techniques involved in the administration, calculation of drug dosages, regulation and maintenance of controlled substances, I.V. therapy and administration of medications in parenteral and non-parenteral forms are presented and practiced.

NUR 317A Pharmacology (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 317
Course description as stated in NUR 317

NUR 318 Professional Nursing:Concepts and Issues (3)
In this course students become immersed in professional nursing, and examine the opportunities and challenges facing the professional nurse in today's health care arena. Theory, research, evidence-based practice, and professional abilities and values are discussed as the basis for providing patient-centered nursing care. Current and future issues and trends in nursing are analyzed in terms of promoting positive patient outcomes and growth of the profession.

NUR 319 Nursing Informatics (3)
In this course, students will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge of computer use including the functions of word processing, spreadsheets, and presentational software. Opportunities to practice searching for, analyzing, and applying electronic resources to improve evidence-based practice and patient-centered care will be incorporated. This course will also assess and analyze current technology used in the health care setting for the ethical and legal implications, including confidentiality.

NUR 320 Medical-Surgical Nursing II: Acute/Chronic Conditions (6)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 207/207C, NUR 360/360C, NUR 430
Corequisite(s): NUR 370/370C
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 320C
This course explores the needs of patients and families experiencing acute/chronic medical/surgical conditions. The focus of nursing care is on the health promotion, health maintenance and illness/disease management for individuals experiencing acute/chronic health conditions. Sound research evidence and clinical judgment provide the foundation upon which students base nursing practice. Clinical experiences allow students to develop caring relationships and use therapeutic communication, collaboration, assessment and developmentally appropriate interventions as they provide patient-centered care. Concepts integrated throughout the course include ethics, legalities, professional role, information literacy, health care technology and human diversity.

NUR 320C Medical-Surgical Nursing II: Acute/Chronic Conditions- Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 320
Course description as stated in NUR 320

NUR 360 Family-Centered Maternity Nursing (4)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 317/317A, NUR 220/220A/220C, BIO 301
Corequisite(s): NUR 207/207C, NUR 430
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 360C
This course explores the needs of patients and families experiencing the childbearing process, including normal and high-risk health conditions. The focus of nursing care is health promotion, health maintenance, and illness/disease management for the childbearing patient (mom and baby) and family. Sound research evidence and clinical judgment provide the foundation upon which students base nursing practice. Clinical experiences allow students to develop caring relationships, and use critical thinking, therapeutic communication, collaboration, assessment, and developmentally appropriate interventions as they provide family-centered care. Concepts integrated throughout the course include ethics, legalities, professional role, information literacy, health care technology, and human diversity.

NUR 360C Family-Centered Maternity Nursing-Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 360
Course description as stated in NUR 360

NUR 370 Patient-Centered Nursing in Mental Health (4)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 207/207C, NUR 360/360C, NUR 430
Corequisite(s): NUR 320/320C
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 370C
This course explores the needs of patients and families experiencing acute and chronic mental health conditions. The focus of nursing care is the health promotion, health maintenance, and illness/disease management for individuals and families experiencing mental health conditions. Sound research evidence and clinical judgment provide the foundation upon which students base nursing practice. Clinical experiences allow students to develop caring relationships, and use critical thinking, therapeutic communication, assessment, and developmentally appropriate interventions as they provide patient-centered care. Concepts integrated throughout the course include ethics, legalities, professional role, information literacy, health care technology, human diversity, and interdisciplinary partnerships.

NUR 370C Patient-Centered Nursing in Mental Health-Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 370
Course description as stated in NUR 370

NUR 370H HON: Patient-Centered Nursing in Mental Health (0)
Course description as stated in NUR 370 (Honors Course)

NUR 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
A part-time work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

NUR 410 Medical-Surgical Nursing III: Complex Conditions I (5)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 320/320C, NUR 370/370C
Corequisite(s): NUR 460/460C, NUR 430
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 410C
This course explores the needs of patients and families experiencing complex medical/surgical conditions. The focus of nursing care is on the health promotion, health maintenance and illness/disease management for individuals experiencing complex health conditions. Sound research evidence and clinical judgment provide the foundation upon which students base nursing practice. Clinical experiences allow students to develop caring relationships, and use therapeutic communication, collaboration, assessment and developmentally appropriate interventions as they provide patient-centered care. Concepts integrated throughout the course include leadership and management, delegation, ethics, legalities, professional role, information literacy, health care technology and human diversity.

NUR 410C Medical-Surgical Nursing III: Complex Conditions I-Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 410
Course description as stated in NUR 410

NUR 415 Health Care Policy (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 431
In this course students examine multiple perspectives on the health care system in the United States. Students will compare and contrast the key features of the U.S. health care system with the key features of the health care systems of other developed countries. The topics of health care delivery, health care policies, health care finance, and health care reform are discussed with an emphasis on the ways nurses can positively influence health care system changes. Areas of exploration include determinants of health, vulnerable populations, and health disparities. This course will also explore the need for nurses to develop cultural competence if they are to become effective advocates of equitable health policies and practices.

NUR 416 Health Promotion with Vulnerable Populations (4)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 431
Corequisite(s): NUR 415
This course provides an opportunity for the student to grow in personal cultural competence, apply community assessment processes, and demonstrate synthesis and application of population-based health promotion concepts. Content and learning strategies focus on caring for vulnerable populations within the community by applying concepts from nursing, related health disciplines, and the liberal arts and sciences. The course has two clinical components: 1) with faculty guidance, the student determines an area in which personal growth in cultural competence is needed and addresses that need through the Diverse Communities Project; and 2) the student partners with a community agency to assess healthcare needs, plan a health promotion program for an at-risk population, implement the program, and evaluate.

NUR 417 Exploring Leadership in Nursing (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 415, NUR 416
In this course students explore a multitude of leadership concepts and theories in depth. Students examine the role and responsibilities of the nurse leader working in interprofessional teams emphasizing the abilities and processes needed to create the future of nursing. The focus is on developing his or her personal style of leadership in the context of the challenges facing nursing in a changing health care environment.

NUR 418 Leadership and the Common Good (4) CCP
Prerequisite(s): NUR 415 and NUR 416
Corequisite(s): NUR 417
This course is taken concurrently with NUR 417, focusing on the application of leadership and management skills in a variety of settings. It promotes synthesis of concepts from nursing, related healthcare disciplines, and the liberal arts and sciences. The RN student will work with expert providers to practice skills for delivering healthcare in diverse environments. The opportunities will allow for implementation of the individual's developing leadership style in the context of the challenges facing nursing in a changing health care environment. The course has two clinical components: 1) preceptorship focuses on the student's partnering with a healthcare provider to plan, implement and evaluate a leadership project which will affect the common good within her/his organization; and 2) capstone which is the synthesis of the concepts from nursing/healthcare, the liberal arts and sciences, and the student's life experiences which demonstrate how the baccalaureate outcomes for the University have been met.

NUR 419 Leading and Managing within a Clinical Microsystem (4)
This course focuses on providing learners with the tools to establish their professional nursing foundation. Learners explore how the integration of ethical core values and knowledge from a variety of disciplines inform decision-making in the provision of high quality nursing care within interprofessional teams in various clinical microsystems. Learners examine leadership and organizational theories, and the management skills applicable to the nursing profession. This course includes practice experiences where the RN student applies course concepts into clinical microsystem environments.

NUR 420 Medical-Surgical Nursing IV: Critical Care (5) EXP
Prerequisite(s): NUR 410/410C, NUR 430, NUR 460/460C, NUR 470
Corequisite(s): NUR 421
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 420C
This course explores the needs of patients and families experiencing life-threatening medical/surgical conditions. The focus of nursing care is on the health promotion, health maintenance and illness/disease management for individuals experiencing critical health conditions. Sound research evidence and clinical judgment provide the foundation upon which students' base nursing practice. Clinical experiences allow students to develop caring relationships, and use therapeutic communication, collaboration, assessment and developmentally appropriate interventions as they provide patient-centered care. Students will develop professional practice behaviors while working with a variety of healthcare professionals in the clinical setting. Concepts integrated throughout the course include ethics, legalities, professional role, information literacy, health care technology and human diversity.

NUR 420C Medical-Surgical Nursing IV: Critical Care-Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 420
Course description as stated in NUR 420

NUR 421 Professional Nursing and the Common Good (3) CCP
Prerequisite(s): NUR 420
The nursing capstone is the culminating interdisciplinary course that interweaves the liberal art and science core curriculum with the baccalaureate nursing curriculum. The capstone achieves a three-fold purpose: (1) to facilitate substantial new learning about a complex global problem; (2) to encourage integration of knowledge, skills, and values from the entire liberal arts and sciences Core Curriculum, including experiential learning (clinical practice), to address that problem; and (3) to strengthen concern and action for the common good as habits of mind. The focus is on socializing the student into the professional role of nursing through the completion of a 120 hour preceptorship while completing capstone assignments that challenge the student to consider complex global healthcare problems. Through capstone assignments students synthesize concepts from nursing, the liberal arts, and sciences, and their life-experiences, demonstrating that they have met the baccalaureate learning outcomes for the University. During the preceptorship, students collaborate with a preceptor nurse further developing practice competencies, including: communication, cultural competence, critical thinking, teaching/learning, leadership, advocacy, coordination and evaluation of patient care. Students also engage in a variety of seminar activities in which they integrate knowledge and practice experiences from current and previous learning in nursing and the liberal arts and sciences.

NUR 422 Nursing and Healthcare for Populations (4)
Prerequisite(s): Registered Nurse and IDS 307, NUR 315 and NUR 430
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 423
With a focus on promoting and advocacy for vulnerable populations within the community, this course explores healthcare disparities related to physiological, environmental, socioeconomic, behavioral, cultural, and political factors. Nursing responsibilities pertaining to global health issues and disaster situations are also addressed. Students develop skills in applying theoretical concepts from multiple disciplines and in using data from the literature to direct evidence-based practice.

NUR 423 Partnering with Populations to Provide Nursing Care (5)
Prerequisite(s): Registered Nurse and IDS 307, NUR 315, NUR 430
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 422
This course is the clinical co-requisite to NUR 422 and is taken concurrently. Content and learning strategies focus on advocacy for vulnerable high risk populations within the community by applying concepts from nursing, related health disciplines, and the liberal arts and sciences. Individually students explore advocacy roles within the community. As members of a peer task group, students partner with a community agency to assess healthcare needs, plan a health promotion program for an at-risk population, and present the program plan to other students.

NUR 424 Nursing Leadership & Management Strategies in Healthcare (4)
Prerequisite(s): Registered Nurse and NUR 422 and NUR 423
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 425
This course draws on theories from nursing and related disciplines to develop a framework for organizational leadership and management. Emphasis is given to change theories and exploration of practical skills that enable the nurse to work collaboratively with clients and colleagues in a variety of settings to improve health care. Contemporary issues related to nursing practice and healthcare delivery are discussed. The Baccalaureate Degree capstone paper is included in this course.

NUR 425 Implementing Nursing Leadership & Mgt Strategies in Healthcare (5)
Prerequisite(s): Registered Nurse and NUR 422 and NUR 423
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 424
Taken concurrently with NUR 424, this course focuses on the application of leadership and management skills in a variety of healthcare settings. It promotes synthesis of concepts from nursing, related health disciplines, and the liberal arts and sciences. Students work in partnership with both community agencies and individual expert providers to practice skills for delivering healthcare in diverse sociopolitical environments. The two major projects are implementation and evaluation of a group community health promotion project planned in NUR 423 and an individual preceptorship experience with a nurse leader or other health professional.

NUR 425S Ser Lrng:Implementing Nur Leader & Mgt Strategies in Healthcare (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 425
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

NUR 430 Research for the Health Sciences (3)
Corequisite(s): Coreq: MTH 174 or Permission of Chairperson
Research in the Health Sciences focuses on the interaction of the components of the research process with application to the theory and practice of healthcare. This course emphasizes the critical appraisal and utilization of health-related research including selected theories and ethical considerations. Critical and reflective thinking, as a health care clinician who provides evidence based practice, will be emphasized.

NUR 431 Foundations of Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (3)
Prerequisite(s): MTH 174 or MTH 176 or Permission of Chairperson
Evidence-based practice in nursing focuses on the interaction of the components of the research process with application to the theory and practice of healthcare. This course emphasizes the critical appraisal and utilization of health-related research including selected theories and ethical considerations. Critical and reflective thinking, as a nurse who provides evidence based practice, will be emphasized.

NUR 452 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study under the guidance of a faculty member to meet stated objectives. Written permission of department chairperson and faculty member required.

NUR 452A Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452B Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452D Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452E Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452G Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452J Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452K Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452L Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452M Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452O Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452P Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452Q Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 452T Independent Study (1-3)
Independent Study Course

NUR 460 Family-Centered Pediatric Nursing (4)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 320/320C, NUR 370/370C
Corequisite(s): NUR 410/410C, NUR 470
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 460C
This course explores the needs of children and families experiencing common and complex health conditions. The focus of nursing care is health promotion, health maintenance, risk reduction and illness and disease management for the child and family. Sound research evidence and clinical judgment provide the foundation upon which students base nursing practice. Clinical experiences allow students to develop caring relationships, and use critical thinking, therapeutic communication, collaboration, assessment, and developmentally appropriate interventions as they provide family-centered care. Concepts integrated throughout the course include ethics, legalities, professional role, information literacy, health care technology, and human diversity.

NUR 460C Family-Centered Pediatric Nursing-Clinical (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 460
Course description as stated in NUR 460

NUR 470 Leadrshp in Professional Nursing (2)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 320/320C, NUR 370/370C
Corequisite(s): NUR 410/410C, NUR 460/460C
This course explores leadership, management, and followership in the context of professional nursing in a variety of health care delivery systems. With an emphasis on nursing responsibilities, it prepares the student to implement effective leadership behaviors in the beginning practice role. Concepts emphasized in this course are: empowerment, negotiation, delegation, change, conflict resolution, team building, and case management.

NUR 496 Co-Op:Alternatng(FT) (1-3) EXP
A full-time work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning outcomes and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

PHI 140 Philosophical Point of View (3) P/CP
This course provides the student with an understanding of the particular perspective from which philosophers consider the world and human experience.

PHI 140H HON:Philosophical Point of view (0) P/CP
Course description as stated in PHI 140 (Honors Course)

PHI 200 Perspectives on Human Nature (3) P/CP
This course emphasizes the importance of our views concerning what it means to be human and the effect of these views on human experience and personal identity. Attention will be given to major views within the history of philosophy or to various ways humanity relates to the world.

PHI 205 Philosophy of Mind (3) P/CP
This course introduces students to contemporary and historical perspectives on the mind and its relation to the brain. Topics such as thought, language, emotion, mental causation, and consciousness will be explored.

PHI 205S Serv Lrng:Philosophy of Mind (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PHI 205
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PHI 220 Political Philosophy (3) CP
An examination of major political theories and ideologies from antiquity to modern times. Among the writers considered: Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Edmund Burke, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Henry David Thoreau, and Mohandas Gandhi.

PHI 285 Philosophy of Art (3) P/CP
This course investigates the place of art in life as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on the function of art, the nature of art, and major theories of art as presented in the Eastern and Western philosophical traditions.

PHI 398 Independent Study (1-3) LAS
This course is designed for students who wish to study an area of their own interest independently. Permission of an instructor is required.

PHI 413Z Community & the Individual (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor
An Auto-Study course.

PHY 105 Physical Science L/L (4) CN
Prerequisite(s): MTH 098 or equivalent
Basic laws and principles governing the nature of matter and forms of energy are considered with an emphasis given to astronomy. Concepts are related to the student's environment. This course is designed primarily for the non-science student. Lecture, lab.

PHY 105S Serv Lrng:Physical Science (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PHY 105
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PHY 130 Astronomy Lecture & LAB (4) N/CN
Prerequisite(s): MTH 098 or MTH 097 or equivalent
Introduction to astronomy including: observations of the sky and how they are effected by Earth's motion; the evolution of astronomical thought; the tools that astronomers use; the Solar System; the nature and evolution of stars and galaxies; and the evolution of the universe. Lecture and laboratory.

PHY 201 General Physics I (3) N
Prerequisite(s): MTH 185 or equivalent
Concurrent requisite(s): PHY 201A
Fundamental principles, laws, and theories of mechanics, energy, and momentum. Lecture.

PHY 201A Gen Physics I (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): PHY 201
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in PHY 201.

PHY 202 General Physics II (3) N
Prerequisite(s): PHY 201, PHY 201A
Concurrent requisite(s): PHY 202A
Fundamental principles, laws, and theories of heat, sound, light, electricity, and relativity. Lecture.

PHY 202A Gen Physics II (LAB) (1) N
Concurrent requisite(s): PHY 202
Laboratory applications of the concepts introduced in PHY 202.

PHY 202H General Physics II (0)
Course description as stated in PHY 202 (Honors Course)

PSC 201 American National Government (3) S
An introduction to the American political system, its structure and historical evolution. The role of political parties, the media and interest groups are considered.

PSC 201S Serv Lrng:Am Nat Gov (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSC 201
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSC 335 International Politics (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Crosslisted SOC 335. This course studies the major political issues and events in the contemporary world. Their historical roots are traced, and their implications for the democratic peace and economic prosperity are analyzed. Particular attention is devoted to the role of the United States in the rapidly changing world.

PSY 103 Introduction to Psychology (3) S/CEP
An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, including the basic terminology, methods, principles, and theories of psychology.

PSY 103H HON:Intro Psychology (3) S/CEP
Course description as stated in PSY 103 (Honors Course)

PSY 103S Serv Lrng:Intro Psychology (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 204 Lifespan Development (4) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
A comprehensive study of human development from conception through death. Theories and research including physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development. [Not intended for students taking PSY 205 or 206.]

PSY 204H HON:Lifespan Development (4) S
Course description as stated in PSY 204 (Honors Course)

PSY 204S Serv Lrng:Lifespan Development (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 204
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 205 Child/Adolescent Development (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
A comprehensive study of human development from conception through adolescence. Principles and theories of development with emphasis on their application to the prenatal, infancy, childhood, and adolescent stages of life. Effects of genetic and social factors on the adaptive capacities of the child. Emphasis on empirically-obtained information. [Not intended for students taking PSY 204.]

PSY 205H HON:Child/Adolescent Develop (0) S
Course description as stated in PSY 205 (Honors Course)

PSY 205S Serv Lrng:Child/Adol Dev (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 205
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 206 Adult Dev and Aging (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H; PSY 205 recommended
The interaction of maturational, social and personality factors in human development from young adulthood to death. Normative development as well as problems of personal, social, familial, and occupational adjustment during each stage of adulthood. [Not intended for students taking PSY 204.]

PSY 206S Serv Lrng:Adult & Aging (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 206
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 208 Social Psychology (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H or SOC 103
Crosslisted SOC 208. The study of how we think about, relate to and influence one another. Social perception, attitudes, social influence, prejudice, aggression, and attraction are examined.

PSY 208S Serv Lrng:Social Psych (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 208
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 210 Sensation and Perception (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Students will examine the processes of vision, hearing, taste, smell, and touch through a combination of lecture, discussion, and both in and out of class activities.

PSY 212 Domestic Violence (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
An interdisciplinary course that looks at the issue of domestic violence from both legal and psychological perspectives and seeks to assist students to understand the complex nature of this problem. Students will explore possible solutions that utilize a combination of both disciplines.

PSY 212S Serv Lrng:Domestic Violence (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 212
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 220 Health Psychology (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Examination of psychological influences on how people stay healthy, why they become ill, and how they respond when they become ill. Topics include behaviors that promote or compromise health, stress and coping, patient-provider relations, and management of pain and chronic illnesses.

PSY 224 Parenting (3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or 103H
Focuses on what parents can do to raise healthy, responsible, competent, and resilient children. Examines research from psychology and other disciplines that illuminate the wide array of variables affecting child outcome. Evidence is analyzed and synthesized to formulate an intentional, outcomes-based approach to parenting.

PSY 224S Serv Lrng:Parenting (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 224
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 225 Human Sexuality (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Biological, social and psychological aspects of sexuality. Issues related to communication, gender, dating, sexual behavior, pregnancy, roles, contraception, and sexual deviance and dysfunction are among the topics discussed.

PSY 275 Sport Psychology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Crosslisted ATR 275. This course is an introduction to the behavior in a sport environment and the mental skills associated with high-level performance in sport.

PSY 292 Forensic Psychology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Crosslisted CRM 292. Persons with mental illness often come in contact with the legal system, and this course addresses major areas of that confluence from the perspective of a forensic psychologist. Topics include competency, sanity at the time of the offense, involuntary hospitalization, civil litigation, child custody psychological evaluations, psychopathy as it relates to criminal behavior, and the challenges associated with being an expert witness.

PSY 309 Social Influence (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or 103H plus 6 additional hours in PSY
An in-depth look at how salespeople, governments, marketers, friends, and others influence our attitudes and behavior. A variety of influence tactics and ways of defending ourselves against them will be examined. Seminar format.

PSY 310 Cognition & Memory (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and MTH 174
In this course, students will examine the major ideas and theories regarding human cognition and memory. This will include Information Processing, Parallel Distributed Processing, Semantic Networks, Neural Networks, Fuzzy Set Theories, as well as both implicit and explicit approaches. Students will examine this material through class discussions, activities and research projects both in and out of class.

PSY 310S Serv Lrng:Cognition & Memory (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 310
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 330 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and either MGT 300 or 6 additional hours of PSY
Crosslisted MGT 330. Provides a survey of the field of industrial/organizational psychology. The student will learn about the principles, practices, and psychological knowledge that guide the activities of industrial/organizational psychologists. Examines the industrial side of I/O psychology (human resources activities such as job analysis, selection, training, and performance evaluation) and the organizational side (the behavior of people in organizations including topics such as motivation, job satisfaction, and leadership).

PSY 335 Tests & Measurements (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Principles and applications of psychological testing. Technical and methodological principles (reliability, validity, standardization), ethical considerations and a survey of currently available tests.

PSY 340 Abnormal Psychology (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
This course covers characteristics, etiology and treatment of psychological and emotional problems. Students will develop a basic knowledge of psychopathology, and emphasis will be placed on reviewing treatments supported by current research. Throughout the course of the semester, students will also develop foundational skills in writing academic literature reviews.

PSY 340H HON:Abnormal Psychology (0) S
Course description as stated in PSY 340 (Honors Course)

PSY 340S Serv Lrng:Abnormal Psych (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 340
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 342 Child Psychopathology (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
During the course of this semester, students will become familiar with psychopathology as it is manifested in children and adolescents. Topics and disorders covered will include mood disorders, anxiety disorders, developmental disorders, eating disorders as well as examining causes of child psychopathology, and their diagnosis and treatment. However, to fully understand psychopathology, a thorough knowledge of typical development is required. As such, we will be briefly reviewing typical development as well as the developmental theory of child psychopathology.

PSY 350 Behavioral Interventions (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
An introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, develop, and implement interventions for a variety of behavior problems and psychological disorders. It will provide basic knowledge on which students can build their skills in such interventions.

PSY 350H HON:Behavioral Interventions (0) LAS
Course description as stated in PSY 350 (Honors Course)

PSY 351 Positive Psychology: Science of Happiness (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Examines scientific research on developing happiness and psychological well-being. Topics include the nature of happiness, self-esteem, developing successful relationships, mindfulness, and more. In this course, you will learn some ways to increase your own levels of happiness.

PSY 360 Biological Psychology (4) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and BIO 131 or BIO 197 or BIO 201
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 360A
Crosslisted BIO 360. The physiological basis of behavior and mental processes. Includes neurophysiology, sense organs, neurotransmitters, and pathological maladies.

PSY 360A Biological Psychology (LAB) (0)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and BIO 131/BIO 131A or BIO 197 or BIO 201
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 360
Crosslisted BIO 360A. LAB to Accompany PSY 360 (Biological Psychology)Animal dissections required

PSY 375 Research I (4)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H, MTH 174 and 6 additional hours in PSY
An introduction to psychological research emphasizing ethics and the integration of research design and statistics. Observational, correlational and survey research are explored in conjunction with descriptive and inferential statistical analysis.

PSY 376 Research II (3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 340 and PSY 375
A continuation of PSY 375. Use of more advanced research designs and statistical methods. Includes experimental design, single-subject research, and quasi-experimental methods.

PSY 380 Pseudoscience and Controversial Claims (3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H plus 6 additional hours in PSY
Examines a variety of controversial therapies, psychological tests, paranormal claims, and other psychological phenomena. Pseudoscientific approaches to gathering evidence for these phenomena will be compared and contrasted with scientific approaches. Seminar format.

PSY 385 Personality Theories (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H and at least Sophomore Standing
This course covers the major theories used to guide research and practice in personality psychology. Theories include trait, cognitive, behavioral, psychoanalytic and humanistic perspectives. Students will apply concepts from these various theories to personalities of well-known figures to contrast the different perspectives.

PSY 385S Serv Lrng:Personality Theory (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 385
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 390 Counseling Theories (3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H
Several dominant paradigms of counseling and psychotherapy will be studied from both a practical and a theoretical perspective. Freud and Psychodynamics, Rogerian Person-Centered Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Reality Therapy, Existential Therapy, Rational-Emotive Therapy, and Behavior techniques will be discussed.

PSY 395 Schizophrenia Oral Histories (1)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103
In this discussion based seminar, students will gain foundational knowledge in preparation for implementation of a project of their design that will be conducted in a subsequent course (PSY 395A). During this term, students will learn about schizophrenia, oral history design and methodology, The Schizophrenia Oral History Project (TSOHP), ethics involved in conducting academic work with vulnerable populations, and stigma related to mental illness as well as ways to challenge that stigma. Students will also take a strengths assessment to identify their personal leadership strengths. Then, at the end of the semester, students will submit a written proposal of a project that will contribute to TSOHP and utilizes their leadership strengths that they will implement in PSY 395A. Students and the instructor will complete a learning contract which will outline the specifics of the seminar.

PSY 395A Schizophrenia Oral Histories (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103, PSY 395
In this course, students will implement a project of their design that will contribute to The Schizophrenia Oral History Project (TSOHP) and that utilizes their leadership strengths. (The identification of personal leadership strengths and development of the project proposal were completed at the end of PSY 395 in the previous semester.) During this term, the student will implement the project (or a part of it, depending on the size of the project) and at the end of the semester submit a written evaluation of that semester's work based on success of project and use of leadership strengths. Students and the instructor will complete a learning contract which will outline the specifics of the project. Note: This course will count towards experiential learning for the core curriculum.

PSY 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220 and permission of psychology advisor
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. PSY 396/496 may be repeated up to nine credit hours.

PSY 397 Practicum (0-3) EXP
This course involves participation in pre-professional activities in a clinical and/or research setting. Credit hours are awarded based on type of activity and number of hours served.

PSY 398 Supervised Research (0-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): Nine Semester hours of PSY, Including PSY 103
Students conduct research under the supervision of a psychology faculty member and /or researcher at an off-campus work site.

PSY 399 Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior psychology major
Students pursue a psychological topic independently under the supervision of a psychology faculty member. Instructor's approval required.

PSY 400 Senior Thesis (3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 375 and 376
Independent project that integrates the theory and research relevant to a student's area of specialization. A thesis project demonstrates research skills and growth in student's area of study.

PSY 400S Serv Lrng:Senior Thesis (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PSY 400
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PSY 410 Great Ideas/History of Psychology (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H plus 6 Additional Hours in PSY and Junior or Senior Standing
Students will gain a perspective on the modern field of psychology by examining its origins. The intellectual environment that gave rise to the field of psychology and important themes through which the field has evolved over the last hundred years will be examined. Seminar format.

PSY 492 People in Organizations (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or MGT 300
Crosslisted MGT 492. This course explores individual, group and organizational processes to increase understanding of self and others in organizations. It emphasizes awareness, self-development, and self-management in the context of organizational issues such as conflict resolution, team performance, and leadership.

PSY 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220 and permission of PSY advisor
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. PSY 396/496 may be repeated up to nine credit hours.

RDG 215 Theoretical Perspectives and Foundations in Literacy (3)
The Theoretical Perspectives and Foundations of Literacy course provides a research-based foundation in the cognitive, socio-cultural, linguistic, and motivational influences on literacy and language development. Scientifically-based reading research models that support the teaching of reading, writing, vocabulary, and spelling will be included. The course contains the empirical research and theoretical knowledge needed to understand the methods and strategies used to teach reading language arts skills and strategies to children through young adults. Topics include language development, the sequence of learning to read, as well as an introduction to the most common approaches to reading language arts instruction across the grade bands. The underlying learning philosophies that support the teaching of reading, writing, vocabulary and spelling will be emphasized, along with the connections between research and practice will be emphasized.

RDG 215S Serv Lrng:Literacy (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): RDG 215
The purpose of the service learning component is to integrate course content and material with service to an identified community organization. Service learning consists of completion of a minimum of 30 on-site hours, as well as instructor- guided reflection. Students will be expected to complete a learning contract, document clock hours, and participate in all reflective activities.

RDG 304 Children's and Adolescent Literature (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School of Education
This course is designed for undergraduate and/or graduate students and has a two-fold purpose. As a survey course, it is designed to assist students in becoming acquainted with the many trade books that are available for children today. An equally important purpose is to enable educators to utilize comprehensive, creative, and insightful strategies to incorporate children's literature into their daily lessons in the classroom. The course will also demonstrate the connectedness of children's literature and the total language arts program

RDG 304H HON:Children's and Adolescent Literature (0)
Course description as stated in RDG 304 (Honors Course)

RDG 305 Literacy Practicum (1)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School
Corequisite(s): RDG 311
The candidate will complete 50 hours of teaching reading and writing under the supervision of a classroom teacher. The candidate will assess, plan, and implement literacy instruction for small groups of children. Candidates are required to be in their practicum placements for a minimum of twice per week.

RDG 311 Content Area Reading (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School
A basic course in methods and procedures for teaching reading skills to use in teaching the content reading subjects, particularly math, science, and social studies. This reading course includes skills and strategies which can be used to assist students in these subjects. Teaching emphasis will be placed on the use of comprehension skills, readability formulas, vocabulary, and study strategies. This course will also include adaptations of reading strategies to meet the needs of the diverse students. 20-hour field experience required.

RDG 316 Literacy Practicum (1)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 215, RDG 330
Concurrent requisite(s): RDG 331
Students will complete 50 hours of teaching, reading, and writing under the supervision of a reading teacher/literacy coach. Students will assess, plan, and implement literacy instruction (reading, writing, vocabulary, spelling) for small groups of children and are required to be in practicum placements for a minimum of twice per week.

RDG 330 Phonics and Linguistics (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School, RDG 215
To teach the teacher candidate the fundamental principles and concepts of the phonological structure of language. The teacher candidate will learn the sound-symbol correspondences of language and understand the relationship of phonemic awareness and phonological system of language to the reading process. The teacher candidate will also learn about the linguistic and cognitive bases of reading.

RDG 330H HON: Phonics and Linguistics (0)
Course description as stated in RDG 330 (Honors Course)

RDG 331 Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 215, RDG 330
Concurrent requisite(s): RDG 316
This course will utilize research findings which emphasize the development of literacy skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) across the grade bands. The focus will be on instructional methods and strategies (curricula, lessons, materials, assessments) that exemplify best practices in reading, writing, vocabulary, and spelling instruction. Thematic planning which incorporates differentiated and developmentally appropriate instruction will be included.

RDG 338 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Problems (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 330
The purpose of this course is to provide instruction to preservice or inservice teachers concerning the diagnosis of reading difficulties in students. The assessment instruments to use when determining the causes of reading difficulties will be stressed. Specific tests for these purposes will be introduced, explained and later administered to students who have been identified as having reading disabilities. Specific needs of a diverse population and/or cultural needs will be included.

RDG 391 Orton-Gillingham Method: Instruction and Practice (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to The School of Education, grade of C or better RDG 305, 330, and 338
This course requires the student to implement a research based intervention program to an individual student and/or small groups of students who are struggling with reading skills. Emphasis is placed on the instructional strategies appropriate for use in effective intervention design and implementation. This practicum course includes three components: 1) learning the Orton-Gillingham method of reading intervention, 2) 20 teaching hours and 3) supervision.

REL 100 Introduction to Christianity (3) R/CR
The Jesus of faith serves as a starting point to explore contemporary and global expressions of Christianity, a major world religion. Christian history and doctrine will be explored in light of Christian practice.

REL 100S Serv Lrng:Intro to Christianity (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 100
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 101 Introduction to Religion (3) R/CR
This course is an examination of how fundamental religious questions arise out of human experience and the variety of ways that people respond to those questions. Attention will be given to both historic and contemporary expressions of religious concern. Concepts of God, faith, religious experience, and theological reflection will be among the topics examined.

REL 101S Serv Lrng:Intro Religion (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 101
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 102 Christian Scriptures (3) R/CR
An exposition of the basic theology of the four Gospels coupled with an analysis of the historical and cultural milieu from which the Christian message arose and the manner in which that message was transmitted and interpreted.

REL 102H HON:Christian Scriptures (3) R/CR
Course description as stated in REL 102 (Honors Course)

REL 102S Serv Lrng:Christ Scriptures (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 102
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 103 Hebrew Scriptures (3) R
The sacred history and literature of ancient Israel as the focus of God's self-revelation. The course will unite historical study, archeology, literary analysis, and biblical theology.

REL 104 Personal Spirituality and Theology of Human Experience (3) R/CR
This course focuses on developing and articulating a personal spirituality culled from theological reflection on one's own experiences and decisions. Methods and principles from both Eastern and Western religious traditions, as well as psychology and the social sciences, serve as resources.

REL 107 Intro to Catholic Christianity (3) R/CR
This course offers students an introduction to the study of Christian theology from the Roman Catholic perspective. It begins by exploring the importance of theological reflection in contemporary culture, and then focuses on the development of present-day Church teachings drawing from both Scripture and Tradition. Topics explored include the Old Testament foundations for Christianity, the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, the profession of faith in the creeds, and the sacraments as sources of God's grace. The course also introduces students to principles of Catholic morality, and offers them an opportunity to compare Catholic teachings with those of other Christian traditions.

REL 108 World Religions (3) R/CR
The core question that people have asked from the beginning of reflective thought can be summed up in one sentence: What is the meaning or purpose of my life? In a world filled with conflict and war, in a country held bound by consumerism and fear, the answers provided by some of the major world religions can show us ways to live a vibrant life. Pre-supposing a basic Christian grounding of the majority of class participants, we will study the age-old wisdom found in Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism and Islam, with emphasis on how this knowledge can energize us to become peacemakers and healers of our global home.

REL 203 Theology of Dr. Martin Luther King (3) R
This course is a study of the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr., focusing on his contribution to Christian theology and ethics through his leadership role in the Civil Rights Movement. Students will be compelled to examine King's interpretation and appropriation of the Bible, of Gandhian ideas and methods, of Western philosophical categories, of the principles of American participatory democracy and Social Gospel concepts, considering how the black experience of oppression and the traditions of the black church influenced him.

REL 204 African-American Religious Experience (3) R
This course in the African- American Religious Experience is designed to enable students to develop an awareness as well as an appreciation of and for the historical religious values and traditions that undergird the African-American religious life in North America. Students will come to grips with the important historical, sociological and spiritual pilgrimage of African Americans from slavery into contemporary life and the suppositions of African-American religious life which help shape the social and contextual hegemony of the African-American community.

REL 206 Spirituality & Wellness (3) R/CR
Judeo-Christian spirituality is incarnational at its core. In the book of Genesis, God "walks in the garden" to encounter the first humans. Moses first meets God in a bush and his people are freed through natural plagues and physical death. The prophets see God's hand in the political-social-economic events of the day and call people to live justly through it all. Jesus Christ is born as a human being to show us that the kingdom of God is among us in the here and now. In this spirituality God enters the "natural world" to show us how to live as whole, healthy, fully conscious humans, through the exercising of freedom of choice - our "Free Will" - in accord with the Divine.

REL 212 Crisis, Faith and Human Development (3) R
This course will look at crisis in adult life as an important time in the growth of faith and self. The potential impact of crisis on individual faith and "sense of self," and the way that faith and self may shape the response to crisis, will be explored through psychological and theological resources.

REL 213 Religion & Human Development (3)
This course will help you explore the interaction between religion and personal growth throughout the life cycle. In doing this, psychological and religious/ theological resources will be used. A basic assumption made in this course is that religion and psychology are both disciplines that seek to define and describe aspects and dimensions of fundamental human experience, and, as such, when integrated, can work together in a mutually supportive fashion to enhance our understanding of what it means to be fully human.

REL 214 Feminist Womanist Theology and Spirituality (3) R
Feminist theology examines the impact of patriarchy on the spirituality of men and women. Beginning with an exploration into Christian archetypes, the course builds to a consideration of the relationship between gender and spirituality. Students will then examine historical responses to sexism within Christianity, including a growing body of literature by Womanist and Mujerista theologians.

REL 215 Life Through Death (3) R/CR
The human encounter with death and dying poses a significant challenge to persons as physical, psychological, social, and spiritual beings. This course will acquaint students with recent research on death and dying from several disciplines, at the same time it helps the student raise his/her consciousness about personal reaction and responses to this encounter. Particular emphasis will be placed on the religious/spiritual dimension of death, grief, and loss, and theological responses to that issue from within the Christian tradition. Ethical issues related to death and dying will also be examined. The student taking this course should emerge from it with an increased awareness of the diversity of issues involved in death and dying that can be applied to managing one's own life journey, as well as to caring for others.

REL 219 Starring God:Religion and Film (3) R
New Course
This course will look at the way in which religious topics, particularly portrayals of God, are depicted in 20th and 21st century film. The student will be introduced to the theology, spirituality, and culture as it is portrayed in a particular film. We will also discuss how film interpretations affect the understanding of religious themes and how these interpretations reflect or alter traditional theology. American as well as international films will be discussed in this class, as well as various religious movements active and influential during the creation of the film.

REL 221 Theology of Human Marriage and Sexuality (3) R
This course introduces students to the theology of marriage and sexuality from the Roman Catholic perspective. The first half of the course explores the biblical and historical foundations that underlie the sacrament of marriage, as well as marriage's nature, purposes, and essential properties. Topics discussed in this part of the course include the importance of matrimonial consent, "mixed" or inter-church marriage, and the distinction between annulment and divorce. The second half of the course focuses on human sexuality and explores the Catholic Church's teachings concerning the nature and purpose of sex, as well as its teachings on pre-marital sexual relations, cohabitation, birth control, and same-sex unions.

REL 228 Addiction/Spiritual Life (3) R
This course will explain how, despite the human capacity to create and to adapt, people and society can become vulnerable to attachments and thus to addictions. These pathological relationships have their source in the spiritual life. The student will study how the particular manifestations of addiction are intimate connected to systems which serve as the primary instructor on how to attain ultimate meaning and purpose in life.

REL 229 Voting for God:Rel & Politics (3) R
New Course
This course will examine the way in which religion has entered into the political arena during the late 20th and early 21st century, and the impact this has had on the global community. Topics to be discussed will be the rise of the Christian Coalition, religion in the public school classroom, religious symbols and quotes on government buildings, conflicts with the separation of church and state, and the rise of wars in the name of religion. Students will come away from this class with a deeper knowledge of political and religious issues in our world today.

REL 234 Sacred Scripture Seen Through Sacred Art (3) CR
Prerequisite(s): 100 Level Religion Recommended
From Early Christianity to the present the practice of rendering sacred themes in art and architectural decoration has been constant. This course explores monuments of architecture, sculpture, and painting inspired by sacred Scripture. Topics include an examination of images of the Life of Christ considered in the sequence of the liturgical year, Marian images, the saints and angels, and Trinitarian images. Additionally, architectural and sacred spaces will be considered. Some of the thematic issues we will consider are Christian art as a facilitator to comprehending Scripture, art as a catalyst for deepened devotion, and Church patronage of religious art and architecture through history.

REL 235 Holistic Wellness: Theory, Practice (3) R
This interactive course will introduce participants to a number of simple, effective holistic practices from different countries and cultures. Practices include Tai Chi, meditation and body movement, acupressure for alleviating pain and stress-related problems, visualization and breathing and hand massage. There will also be time for reflection and sharing. The simplicity of the work invites participants to easily share what they learn with others and is especially valuable to those working in education, health ministries, parish nursing, counseling, etc. Much of the content of the workshop is based on the work of Dr. Patricia Cane and Capacitar International, Inc.

REL 242 Exploring the Sacred (3) CR
This course seeks to explore the ways in which we may encounter the sacred in our lived experience, rather than in formal creeds or religious institutions. Students will examine the spiritual/sacred dimensions of their world by looking through a variety of different lenses, and using the tools of several different disciplines to bring those experiences into focus. Students can expect to develop a clearer understanding of the experience of the sacred, by exploring their own stories, and the stories of others as those are presented in both sacred and secular texts. The course will pay special attention to the significance that culture has in shaping and interpreting the experience of the sacred, and the variety of responses that may emerge out of this experience.

REL 245 Women in Christianity (3) R/CR
This course will consider all of the dimensions and dynamics of the spiritually-potent women who have imagined and enfleshed the mission of Jesus. Using short readings, input, and reflective dialogue we will consider ideas shaped by the religious experience of women throughout Christian history. Theological themes to be explored will include God, Trinity, Redemption, Reconciliation, Sacrament and Discipleship.

REL 245S Serv Lrng:Women in Christianity (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 245
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 302 Survey of Church History (3) R
A study of the pervasive role of the Christian Church in the shaping of European culture from the fall of the Roman Empire through the Renaissance.

REL 310 American Religious Experience (3) R
An introduction to the interplay between religion and the emergence of a distinctive American identity. This survey will focus on various interpretations and explanations which are still shaping this lively experiment.

REL 314 Spirituality of Leadership (3) R/CR
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
This course aims at the relationship between one's personal spirituality and effective leadership. Further, it considers leadership in the workplace as a personal calling. The course will explore one's innate desire for integrity of life, and will examine the common good as both the purpose of business, and as necessary for human development. The good habits of acting, known as virtues, will be considered. The application of virtue to practical situations in the workplace, and in the world at large, will allow the principles of Christian social teaching to be integrated with management theory.

REL 323 Spiritual Care of Women (3) R
New Course
This course examines the pastoral care of women, specifically, the three crucial dynamics that weave together attending practices in the healing and growth process: context, collaboration and diversity. Spiritual strategies specific to women entering ministry, intergenerational female-to-female mentoring, and complex care issues seekers present in caregiving relationships such as rape, violence, breast cancer, eating disorders, lesbianism, and gender discrimination will be discussed.

REL 335 Vatican II and American Social History (3) R
New Course
This course will focus on how average Catholics (laity, parish priests and nuns) understood the changes in their religious lives from the end of World War II until 1978 (the death of Pope Paul VI). We will look at response on the US parish level: What motivated change? How did various types of people respond to it? While the bulk of the course will focus on the Vatican II era, we will spend the last day on contemporary "legacies." Students will do taped interviews of Catholics who lived through the era, and will read materials produced during this transformative time in church history.

REL 339 Seminar in Spirituality: Critical Issues in Human Sexuality (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): REL 101,102 and 107 or any JCG Course
This upper-level seminar in spirituality explores complex and critical issues of human sexuality. Students will reflect theologically on topics of sexuality, and identify resources to develop a spirituality oriented towards human flourishing. Instructor's permission required for non-majors.

REL 340 Spirituality and Aging (3) S/R
Prerequisite(s): 100 Level REL
Crosslisted GST 340. A holistic approach to the enrichment and growth of elderly persons' spiritual experience will be examined from a nondenominational point of view with references to psychology and the behavioral sciences. Topics such as prayer, reconciliation and peace, interpersonal relationships, the faith of the elderly, and stages of development will be discussed.

REL 347 Seminar Systematic Theology I (3) R
This seminar-style course investigates key areas in systematic Christian theology in their historical and contemporary development, including Christology, doctrine of God, pneumatology, ecclesiology, soteriology, theological anthropology, liturgy and sacraments, and revelation, doctrine, and creed. Particular attention is given to theological hermeneutics, analysis, and reflection.

REL 348 Seminar Systematic Theology II (3) R
This seminar-style course investigates key areas in systematic Christian theology in their historical and contemporary development, including Christology, doctrine of God, pneumatology, ecclesiology, soteriology, theological anthropology, liturgy and sacraments, and revelation, doctrine, and creed. Particular attention is given to theological hermeneutics, analysis, and reflection.

REL 348S Serv Lrng:Seminar Systematic Theology II (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 348
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 350 Pauline Theo/Christ Begin (3) R/CR
Prerequisite(s): 100 level REL
This course is a study of the content and background of the letters of the Apostle Paul. Emphasis will be placed upon Paul's life, the literary and rhetorical structure of his letters, and the specific theological and pastoral themes addressed in the letters. Particular attention will be given to the social context of Paul's Christian communities, and how it impacts his message to them. We will also explore the impact of these issues in contemporary pastoral ministry contexts.

REL 350S Serv Lrng:Pauline Theo/Christ Begin (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 350
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 351 Spirituality of the Johannine Literature (3) R/CR
Prerequisite(s): 100 level Religion
Together we will explore the basic theology and spirituality of the Gospel of John and the Johannine Epistles, with an analysis of the milieu and culture out of which the Christian message arose and was transmitted.

REL 351H HON:Spirituality of the Johannine Literature (0) R/CR
Course description as stated in ENG 351 (Honors Course)

REL 368 Pathways to Contemplative Living (3) R
New Course
This three credit practical course is designed to expose students to contemplative practice, which is necessary component for ministerial effectiveness and personal spiritual growth, Healthy Christian maturity incorporates both active and contemplative elements within the spiritual life Dynamic ministry stems from engaged service balanced by a mindfulness that nourishes intimacy with God, with self, with others, and with creation. Designed to be both formative and informative, classes will provide instruction from selected classical spiritual sources with the intent of raising the personal awareness and development of spiritual practices of the class participants. Integration of these insights will be fostered through reflection on the formative and deformative aspects of one's formation history. The methodology for the course will include lectures, dialogue, prayer, and journaling. Written and spoken sharing on one's own salvation history will be a key aspect of the class.

REL 370 Catholicism in Rome:A Sacred Journey Through Faith & Art (3) EXP/IDS
This course offers students an on-site learning experience of the history of Catholicism in Rome from both and a faith (theological) and artistic perspective. Students will explore how the Catholic Church came into existence within the Roman Empire, and also how it developed in Rome over the next two millennia. They will also explore artistic contributions to this development - how art was commissioned and used to convey the sacred - with particular emphasis on the medieval. Renaissance, and Baroque periods. The travel portion of the course takes place over spring break.

REL 382 God the What:What our Metaphors for God Reveal About our Beliefs in God (3)
New Course
This course will examine the language we use in describing God and how that language impacts our understand of and belief about God.

REL 399 Concluding Seminar & Capstone (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours of Core completed
The Capstone course is an integrating component of the religious studies, the religious education, the pastoral ministry programs and the baccalaureate level learning outcomes. Students should be expected to apply pertinent ideas and questions from the liberal arts and sciences to a particular focus in religious studies. Within the timeframe of the semester, the students will prepare and publicly present a thesis paper, demonstrating the ability to identify themes (e.g. human suffering), apply strategies (e.g. social analysis; biological process), and critically examine ideologies (e.g. creationism) from the liberal arts and sciences in order to communicate in the written and spoken word about a specific question pertinent to contemporary religious studies.

RPS 268 Bringing about a Sustainable Reign of God (3)
This course explores why we are called to live more sustainably and gives practical ways to live that are more in keeping with Gospel teaching. We will look at the signs of times in which we are now living and apply Jesus' message of love and compassion towards all of God's creation. We will also look at ways in which we can spread this message to others.

RPS 301 Coming to the Well,Theology of Ministry in a Changing World (3) R
New Course
Prerequisite(s): 12 Hours of REL Course
This course will introduce pastoral care and ministry, beginning with an overview of the history of pastoral care in the Christian tradition. Students will begin focusing on the particular kinds of pastoral care and ministry that have effected their own story. Panelists will offer insights about the opportunities, challenges and graces that come with various ministerial commitments. This course will conclude with an inventory of suggestions and services that are available to support you as you move through this program, such as spiritual direction, counseling and ministry involvement.

RPS 308 Laity, Spirituality & Ministry (3)
New Course
This course examines the spiritual care of minister and ministry. How can spirituality of the laity be encouraged and nurtured in a ministerial context? What are the spiritual resources that support discernment of ministerial gifts and talents? What spiritually sustains the lay minister in the ministerial context? Students will be invited to examine the deep roots of, resources for, and influence of spirituality and ministry in contemporary spiritual care of the laity. Practical strategies for developing and sustaining a healthy spiritually will be explored, including prayer, contemplation, Biblical reflection, holistic self-assessment, and maintaining healthy relationships within the ministerial context.

RPS 309 Christian Mystical Tradition Spirit/Theo Resource Lay Ministry (3)
New Course
This course provides an overview of several Christian mystics (Bernard of Clairvaux, Francis of Assisi, Julian of Norwich, and Teresa of Avila), mining their writings for their theological insights and their contributions to spiritual formation. Class sessions will primarily consist of the discussion of texts, but individual and communal contemplative practices will also be introduced. Students will gain a greater appreciation of the Christian mystical tradition in general as well as developing spiritual practices for their ongoing personal/spiritual development and for their pastoral work.

RPS 340 Philosophy and Methods of Religious Education (3)
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
This course is an introduction to the field of Christian religious education. Along with studying the ideas and events which have shaped the teaching of Christian faith, participants will examine the wider contents - church, family, community - in which this activity takes place.

RPS 341 Ministry to Marriage & Family (3)
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
This course will explore the pastoral issues which directly apply to the preventative health or enrichment strategies for marriage and families, as well as remediation issues. It will deal with the family as a system, social analysis of the family and the developmental family life cycle.

RPS 342 Pastoral Counseling (3)
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
Short-term counseling of individuals. Basic principles of counseling involving problems typically encountered in parish life will be stressed. A study of counseling theories and methods as they apply to the various areas of pastoral ministry.

RPS 345 Pastoral Internship (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
Supervised pastoral education on a part-time basis during the academic year under the guidance of a professional supervisor. The course is designed to develop in the student pastoral expertise in one or several areas of concern. Possible areas of choice include: campus ministry, social action, retreat work, work with aged, religious education, chaplaining, pastoral care, youth ministry, and support group work.

RPS 346 Advanced Pastoral Internship (3)
Prerequisite(s): RPS 345
An extension of Pastoral Internship.

RPS 350 Youth Ministry (3)
An exploration of issues affecting the practice of Christian religious education and ministry with youth. This course examines the interplay between North American culture, the developmental phrase of youth and the "church systems," parish, school, family in which youth ministry happens. Youth workers are encouraged to integrate a theoretical understanding of this ministry with the practical skills for working with young people.

RPS 361 The Practice of Pastoral Care: An Intercultural Approach (3) R
New Course
Intercultural spiritual care must, first, use a phenomenological comparative approach that fully recognizes the differences between our religious worlds and the spiritual worlds of those seeking care. Second, caregivers must be able to use their theological education to use their own stories as resources in the caregiving process, and not roadblocks. Third, careseekers must be accountable for establishing an ethically sound contract of care. Fourth, careseekers must be able to draw upon psychological perspectives on loss, violence, and coping, and theological perspectives on suffering to construct and theologically grounded plan of care. Using case studies from film and our own life experiences of trauma and pastoral care, we will become familiar with this approach to intercultural spiritual care.

RPS 380 Special Topics (1-4)
To be arranged by student with a faculty member.

RPS 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

RPS 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

SED 215 Human Exceptionalities (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): SED 215S
Survey of the differing areas and types of human exceptionalities. General characteristics, etiology, classification, incidence, and learning potential of different exceptionalities are presented. An overview of federal and state laws governing the education of children with disabilities is presented.

SED 215S Serv Lrng:Human Exceptionalities (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SED 215
The purpose of the service learning component is to integrate course content and material with service to an identified community organization. Service learning consists of completion of a minimum of 30 on-site hours, as well as instructor- guided reflection. Students will be expected to complete a learning contract, document clock hours, and participate in all reflective activities.

SED 330 Assess/Diagnosis in SED (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and SED 351
This course involves the intensified study of educational assessment and diagnosis of school-age students. The course includes the study and use of standardized and nonstandardized assessment instruments to diagnose academic, behavior and other learning problems. It emphasizes the ability to evaluate reading, spelling, arithmetic, written language, and spoken language problems as well as social and motor handicaps.

SED 331 Moderate to Intense Instructional Strategies (3)
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate students must be within 30 credit hours of graduation
Corequisite(s): SED 335
This course provides a study of curriculum programming, instructional environments and strategies, and assessment techniques for use with students with moderate to intense needs. The areas of social skills, behavior, functional academics, technology, communication, and transition are covered. Curriculum adaptations and support in the general education curriculum are addressed. Best practices in community-based instruction, authentic assessment, and ecological evaluations are emphasized. Students must participate in a practicum along with this course. Failure to complete the practicum will result in failure of the course.

SED 332 Moderate/Intense Practicum (1)
Prerequisite(s): Undergtraduate students must be within 30 credit hours of graduation
Corequisite(s): SED 331
This course involves 50 hours of field work. Students will develop and implement differentiated instruction and supports for students with mild/moderate education needs in inclusive settings across different age levels and under the supervision of a cooperating teacher(s) and university supervisor.

SED 333 Curriculum & Methods/Students with Mild/Moderate Needs (1)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and EDU 207
This course involves 50 hours of field work. Students will plan and implement differentiated curriculum and instructional strategies with students who have mild/moderate needs in a variety of settings, across different age levels, and under the supervision of a cooperating teacher(s) and university supervisor.

SED 334 Inclusive Teaching, Support and Transition (1)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and PSY 205 or EDU 307
Concurrent requisite(s): SED 345
This course involves 50 hours of field work. Students will develop and implement differentiated instruction and supports for students with mild/moderate education needs in inclusive settings across different age levels and under the supervision of a cooperating teacher(s) and university supervisor.

SED 340 Teaching in an Inclusive Setting (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School, Practicum and SED 215
This course focuses on the skills teachers need to fully integrate students with special needs into general education settings. Models of teacher consultation and collaboration for differentiating instruction, course content, materials and grading procedures to accommodate students with diverse needs in an inclusive classroom are covered.

SED 345 Issues in Accessibility and Transition (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School and SED 380
Concurrent requisite(s): SED 334
This course focuses on creating accessibility for learning and participation in inclusive settings. Evaluation and practice with computer technology and adaptive equipment is included in the course. The course also includes principles and techniques for providing career education and transition services.

SED 351 Intro to Learning Disabilities (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School, SED 215, RDG 215
This course will survey the field of learning disabilities (LD). Students will learn the history of the learning disability field by studying the different underlying theories. Students will also examine the characteristics, assessment, and diagnosis of students classified as learning disabled. Emphasis is placed on relevant literature as it pertains to the aforementioned topics.

SED 380 Curriculum & Methods/Students with Mild/Moderate Needs (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to School
Corequisite(s): SED 333
Methods, materials and techniques used in the education of students with mild and moderate needs. Emphasis is placed on both remediation and compensation strategies and techniques for academic, social and behavioral problems. The course presents a variety of techniques for teaching basic academic skills (reading, spelling, mathematics, writing, oral language) and how to modify instructional materials for students who need mild/moderate levels of support. The course also relies on research-supported instructional strategies for designing classroom environments that best facilitate learning. Students participate in a practicum in a classroom in conjunction with this course.

SED 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work experience supervised by Education Department faculty in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of a predetermined Learning Assignment and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. May be repeated for a maximum total of six credits.

SED 444 SED Student Teaching (12)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Department and permission from Clinical Experience Director and EDU 207
Intensive full-day experience in teaching and related professional development. The 15-week experience involves systematic planning and execution of responsibilities under the supervision of experienced certified special education personnel and University supervisors in two settings.

SED 495 Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Education School Dean
Independent study under the guidance of a faculty member to meet stated objectives.

SED 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
Work experience supervised by Education Department faculty in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of a predetermined Learning Assignment and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. May be repeated for a maximum total of six credits.

SED 499 Workshops in Special Education (1-3)
The workshop's content will be announced when the course is offered.

SOC 103 Our Social World (3) S/CS
This course introduces students to the scientific study of society. It offers a systematic analysis of the dynamic interconnections between our individual lives and our social worlds. In this course we'll explore many dimensions of local and global social institutions and practices, working to understand how our own lives are embedded within and shaped by our social environments.

SOC 103S Serv Lrng:Intro Sociology (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SOC 103
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SOC 201 Social Problems and Deviant Behavior (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Extensive exploration of the various sociological approaches to the study of deviance and social problems. Includes such topics as changing sex roles, AIDS, euthanasia, suicide, crime, terrorism, and governmental deviance. Emphasis on contemporary theory and research.

SOC 202 Race, Class, Gender (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Study of intergroup, racial and ethnic relations in America, including the cultural and political problems resulting from prejudice and discrimination.

SOC 202S Serv Lrng:Race, Class, Gender (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SOC 202
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SOC 204 Cultural Anthropology (3) S
An introduction to the study of human life and culture. Examines the beginnings of civilization, the relationship between biological and cultural evolution, and the world's cultural diversity.

SOC 208 Social Psychology (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or SOC 103
Crosslisted PSY 208. The study of how we think about, relate to and influence one another. Social perception, attitudes, social influence, prejudice, aggression, and attraction are examined.

SOC 212 Sociology of Sports (3) S
Students will explore and discover the structural and cultural relationship of sport to society. Students will also examine the issues of race, gender, social stratification, deviances, and economics as they relate to sport in society.

SOC 212S Serv Lrng:Sociology of Sports (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SOC 212
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SOC 216 Sociology of the Family (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Families and the functions of the family as a social institution are studied within the context of social and cultural forces that have an impact on them. The interdependencies of families and communities are examined.

SOC 218 Mars and Venus? Gender,Culture and Society (3)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Are men and women really so different? This course examines this question by exploring the social construction of sex, gender, and sexuality across cultures and societies. It explores the various ways in which gender shapes and is shaped by social institutions, organizations, ideologies, representations, and practices. We will examine several substantive topics as they intersect with sex, gender and sexuality such as the body, media, religion, sport, love, and health/medicine. This course will facilitate the development of your critical thinking, reading and writing skills.

SOC 219 European Sport:A Comparative Approach (1) EXP
Students will examine the particularities of different European sports to understand the larger political, economic, and cultural frameworks within which they emerged.

SOC 220 Childhood and Society (3) S
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
This course provides an introduction to twenty-first century childhood in the United States. It explores the concepts, theories, and empirical research within the sociological study of childhood. The course examines: Competing theoretical approaches to children and childhood, how the meaning of childhood and adolescence changes over time, place, and social context, how children's lives and identities co-constitute peer, popular, and media cultures, and the social problems and public policies that impact children's lives.

SOC 220S Serv Lrng:Sociology of Childhood (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): SOC 220
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SOC 221 Sociology of Film (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
The primary goal of this course is to use movies, documentaries, and docudramas to illuminate sociological phenomena and events in terms of sociological theory, concepts, and research, and thus help students to understand and apply core sociological concepts and theories and apply them to a number of movies watched in class and outside of class. Students will also evaluate movies in terms of the extent to which they uncritically transmit bias, stereotypes, ideology, and misinformation regarding gender, race ethnicity, poverty, and important social problems.

SOC 222 Health and Crime (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
This course examines the different ways crime and health intersect. Sociological, criminological and public health theories will be explored to understand how delinquency/crime and health relate to one another. Additionally, this course will explore how crime and crime location may be a predictor of health outcomes.

SOC 261 Social and Psychological Aspects of Aging (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
An explanation of the basic sociological and psychological concepts and principles of aging individuals. Topics such as the social theories of aging, socialization, life course, social inequality, primary relationships, economy, the community, politics, and government will be covered.

SOC 289 Women's Issues and the Law (3) S
Crosslisted LGS 289. This course is about gender differences and gendered human interrelationships. Through reading and discussion of legislation, judicial opinions, and other sources, we will examine how U.S. law reflects and reinforces social and institutional arrangements that channel men and women into different roles and allocates power between them. We will also look at alternative formulations of legal concepts and at how law is made and implemented. Students should be able to develop a critical analytical approach that can be the basis for evaluating future changes in law.

SOC 300 Mgmt/Fnd Raising in Nonprofit (3)
Prerequisite(s): Junior status or above and permission of instructor.
Concurrent requisite(s): SOC 300S
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the nonprofit, philanthropic sector and expose students to many of the import aspects of nonprofit management and fund raising. The course is structured specifically to meet several of the American Humanics competency requirements for certification, including competencies within the areas of: historical and philosophical foundations, general nonprofit management, board and volunteer development and management, program planning, financial and risk management, fund raising, and career development and exploration. Service-learning in a nonprofit agency is an important aspect of the class.

SOC 301 Sociology of Science and Technology (3) CS
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
This course is an introduction to the study of science and technology from a sociological perspective. Students will learn about science's social structure, the social institutions that support and constitute scientific activities, how people construct scientific knowledge through social interactions, and the nature and consequences of the relationships between science and other major social institutions. We will study the connections and tensions between science and religion, politics, economy, and gender. We will also examine the ways in which technology is socially constructed, how it structures social relations, and mediates the relationships between social institutions. At the conclusion of this course students will have learned some of the major arguments and evidence associated with the sociology of science and technology.

SOC 302 Social Perspectives on Motherhood (3) S
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
This course explores U.S. motherhood as a socially constructed institution and set of practices. Students will examine the social context that shapes contemporary social expectations and experiences surrounding motherhood. Students will become familiar with diverse social perspectives on birthing, maternal health and wellbeing, work-family balance, and mothering practices. The impact of social class, race-ethnicity, gender and national policy are also explored. Special topics such as poverty, incarceration, postpartum maternal health, and single-mothering are considered.

SOC 302S Serv Lrng:Social Perspectives on Motherhood (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): SOC 302
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SOC 335 International Politics (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Crosslisted PSC 335. The course studies the major political issues and events in the contemporary world. Their historical roots are traced, and their implications for democratic peace and economic prosperity are analyzed. Particular attention is devoted to the role of the United States in this rapidly changing world.

SOC 350 Special Topics: Sociology of Work, Occupations & Professions (1-3)
Topics vary. May be repeated once as topic changes.

SOC 370 Sociological Theories (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
The development of sociological theories; the study of outstanding contemporary sociologists and their contributions in research, social policy and practice.

SOC 373 Sociology of Globalization (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
This course explores diverse themes and aspects of emergent global society. Course will examine how globalization impacts individuals and societies and the development of world culture. Students will gain knowledge of and insight in processes of globalization and their consequences for cultural diversity.

SOC 375 Social Research I (4)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103, SOC 103, MTH 174 or MTH 175 or MTH 176, and two additional courses in PSY or SOC
Crosslisted SWK 375. An introduction to social research emphasizing ethics and the integration of basic and applied research designs and statistics. Observations, surveys and simple experiments are carried out in conjunction with descriptive and inferential statistical analysis.

SOC 377 Eval,Res,Grantsmanship (3)
Crosslisted SWK 377. An application of basic research methods and data collection learned in Behavioral Sciences Research Methods I to the evaluation of existing programs in social agencies, and the tasks and skills of grant writing to develop new programs and services. Students learn how to locate grant sources, integrate program evaluation into grant proposals, and practice grant writing.

SOC 377S Serv Lrng:Eval,Res,Grants (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SOC 377
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SOC 380 Independent Study (1-3)
Student-initiated project intended to add a new dimension of education and encourage intellectual activity, initiative and sustained effort. Topics to be chosen in consultation with an instructor who has special competence in the subject involved. Open to junior and senior majors. Approval of instructor required.

SOC 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

SOC 400 Senior Thesis (3)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 375 and SOC 377 or PSY 376
Independent projects which integrate the theory and research relevant to students' areas of specialization. Thesis projects demonstrate critical thinking skills and growth in students' areas of study.

SOC 401 Behavioral Science Seminar (1)
New Course
This course is designed to have students in the Behavioral Sciences program demonstrate their background and mastery in the areas of Psychology, Sociology, Criminology, and related fields. Students will apply their knowledge in these areas to current and historical issues that face the scientific community and general population as a whole.

SOC 405 Behavioral Sciences Capstone (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours Core curriculum completed
A reflective, integrative experience for all majors from the Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills the university capstone requirement. Students will examine their undergraduate learning through reflection, discussion, and examination of a significant problem. Students will produce a paper and a poster presentation in which they will integrate the Baccalaureate Level Learning Outcomes with their majors and their life-long goals for learning and service.

SOC 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

SPA 101 College Spanish I (3) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 101A
A basic introduction to Spanish emphasizing confidence-building in the use of practical, spoken language. Attention is focused on pronunciation and speech patterns, the development of a working vocabulary, and the framing of simple sentences. Students are introduced to the concepts of cultural diversity and the appreciation of other cultures. Laboratory practice. No prerequisite.

SPA 101A College Spanish I (LAB) (1) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 101
Course description as stated in SPA 101

SPA 102 College Spanish Lev I (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): SPA 101
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 102A
This course builds on material covered in Spanish 101 to further develop the student's ability to speak, write and read in Spanish. Attention is focused on expanding vocabulary, increasing mastery of Spanish grammar and parts of speech, and introducing additional verb tenses. Guided practice will strengthen student's communication skills in Spanish. Students will continue to explore the diverse cultures that make up the Spanish speaking world.

SPA 102A Col Spanish I (LAB) (1) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 102
Course description as stated in SPA 102

SPA 201 College Spanish II (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): SPA 101 and 102 or their equivalent
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 201A
For students who can already control simple Spanish structures in conversation. This class will increase the student's facility in speaking, improve aural comprehension and expand vocabulary. Stress is placed on diversity in communicative styles within the Spanish-speaking world. Cultural and literary readings. Laboratory practice.

SPA 201A College Spanish II (LAB) (1) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 201
Course description as stated in SPA 201

SPA 202 Col Spanish Lev II (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): SPA 101, 102, 201 or their equivalent.
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 202A
For students who can already control simple Spanish structures in conversation. This class will increase the student's facility in speaking, improve aural comprehension and expand vocabulary. Stress is placed on diversity in communicative styles within the Spanish-speaking world. Cultural and literary readings. Laboratory practice.

SPA 202A College Spanish II (LAB) (1) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 202
Course description as stated in SPA 202

SPA 220 Spanish Written Communication (3) LAS
New Course
Students will practice intermediate-level Spanish writing skills for use in personal and professional communication requirements; prior ability in Spanish needed.

SPA 230 Spanish Conversation and Culture (3) LAS
New Course
Students will practice intermediate-level Spanish conversational skills and strategies within culturally appropriate context for personal and professional use; prior ability in Spanish needed.

SPA 320 Literature in Spanish (3) LAS
New Course
Students will examine authentic Spanish language texts for their cultural, linguistic and intellectual content; prior ability in Spanish needed.

SPA 330 Spanish for the Professions (3) LAS
New Course
Students will be introduced to and practice specialized Spanish vocabulary and idioms for use in their specific professional and career situations; prior ability in Spanish needed.

SPA 358 Hispanic Literature in English (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): SPA 101/Equivalent, COM/ENG 101 and COM 100
Crosslisted ENG 358. Students will examine a selection of modern Latin-American authors translated into English for their literary, cultural, and linguistic content. Minimum competency in Spanish needed.

SPM 150 Introduction to Sport Management (3)
This course introduces the components of sport and the sport industry including an introduction to business concepts applied to sport. Career opportunities and competency skill sets will also be discussed as well as the many different settings in which sporting activities occur.

SPM 150S Serv Lrng:Intro to Sport Mgmt (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SPM 150
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SPM 185 Historical & Socio-Cultural Dimensions in Sport (3)
This course discusses sport as a microcosm of society. The influence of history, cultural traditions, social values, and psychosocial experiences will be explored. Students will learn that as sport managers in the sport industry, they will benefit from recognizing that these historical and socio-cultural influences affect every aspect of sport. Students will also identify and discuss the internal and external factors that influence and shape sport in society.

SPM 225 Principles of Athletic Administration (3)
This course is designed to assist the prospective coach and administrator with gaining competence in applying competitive tactics and strategies appropriate to the sport environment. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing effective administration, coaching education, scouting procedures, conducting efficient practice sessions, utilizing game management strategies, skill analysis, sportsmanship, coaching diverse athletes, managing athletes' behavior, preventing and addressing drug and alcohol abuse, and coaching using the games approach. A 15 hour field component is required.

SPM 240 Governance & Policy in Sport (3)
This course introduces students to the power and politics of sport organizations. Students learn how people involved in governance set the tone of an entire organization and how individual sport governing bodies fit into the greater sport industry. How these organizations control sport activities on a local, national, and global level will be discussed as well as an understanding of their authority, organizational structure, and function.

SPM 305 Health Issues (3)
This course reinforces the concept that living a healthy and productive life involves both the mind and body. It presents the fundamentals of wellness and principles for living both a mentally and physically healthy life. In the course, topics include exploring the various dimensions of wellness, eliminating self-defeating behaviors, assessing the health-related components of physical fitness, and the dangers of stress and other negative factors.

SPM 330 Sport Marketing,Promotion and Sales (3)
Marketing and sales concepts within the unique aspects of sport and the sport industry will be discussed. The sport consumer and sport product markets will be studied. A 20 hour minimum field component including active participation in at least one of the following areas with instructor/department approval is required: fundraising, ticket sales, consumer demographic or psychographic research, merchandising, sponsorship, endorsement, venue and event marketing, special events, media promotion, or other instructor approved area.

SPM 330S Serv Lrng:Sport Marketing Promo & Sales (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SPM 330
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SPM 340 Coaching of Team Sports (3)
Crosslisted ATR 340. This course focuses on the coaching team sports. Emphasis will be on coaching theory, instructional skill development, planning for practices, and game strategies.

SPM 340S Serv Learn:Coaching of Team Spts (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SPM 340
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SPM 341 Coaching of Individual and Dual Sports (3)
Crosslisted ATR 341. This course focuses on the coaching of individual and dual sports. Emphasis will be on coaching theory, instructional skill development, planning for practices, and game strategies.

SPM 342 Sport Skills (3)
Crosslisted ATR 342. This course focuses on the development of cognitive and psychomotor skills of selected sports. Emphasis will be on psychomotor skill development and assessment of these skills.

SPM 343 Principles of Coaching (3)
New Course
In depth analysis pertaining to the coaching of team/individual and dual sports.

SPM 355 New Media & Public Relations (3)
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and COM/ENG 101
This course stresses the familiarity with the principles of interpersonal communication, mass communication, and interaction with the public and media as they involve the sport industry. Emphasis will be placed on interactions both internal and external to sport agencies particularly those involving communication at entry-level sport management positions that also include "new media" such as broadcasting and webcasts.

SPM 360 Professional Team Sports (3)
New Course
An examination of professional team sports including topics such as ownership, league operations, governance, the role and impact of television, labor/management relationships, licensing and sponsorship, and the perceived role of professional sport in American society. Course content will be disseminated through a combination of lectures, readings, guest speakers, videos, field trips, and student presentations.

SPM 375 Sport Facilities and Event Management (3)
This course will introduce students to the application of basic principles of facility management with emphasis on intercollegiate athletics, professional sport, and multisport club operations. The function of the course is threefold: first, it is intended to provide Sport Management students with a broad appreciation of facility management; second, it will provide students with an up-to-date understanding of facility management concepts as they are currently being applied in various sport management contexts; and finally, it is intended to provide a foundation for those students who plan to do advanced study and work in facility management.

SPM 375S Serv Lrng:Sport Facility Mgmt (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SPM 375
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SPM 380 Sport Law (3)
Crosslisted LGS 380. Sport and recreation activities by their very nature have the potential for litigation. Familiarity with the law in these areas and the legal concepts behind the law will be discussed. Topics such as risk management, liability, crowd control, as well as tort, constitutional, and contract law will be stressed.

SPM 386 International Sport Management (3)
This course is designed to guide students toward a critical understanding of sport in the global context. The course provides students with a conceptual and theoretical foundation of international sport management through a sociocultural examination of the field of play in various parts of the world, issues and challenges of the global sport environment, and the governance of international sport. Management principles such as macroeconomics, finance, law, service quality, and social responsibility in the global environment will be discussed. Students will also be exposed to international sport business strategies in marketing, new media, facility management, and tourism.

SPM 386S Serv Lrng:International Sport Management (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SPM 386
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SPM 390 Contemporary Sport Leadership (3)
New Course
This course is designed to guide students toward a critical understanding of contemporary leadership in the sport context. The course provides students with a conceptual and theoretical foundation of leadership in the context of sport. Students will develop their own models for effective leadership by exploring leadership styles and skill sets, ethical approaches, strategy and innovation, communication and conflict resolution, team and group dynamics, diversity, global contexts, and organizational change.

SPM 394 Sport Management Internship (0) EXP
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A sport management related work experience supervised by a sport management faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Work assignment is for a minimum of 15 hours a week. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

SPM 395 Sport Finance & Development (3)
This course discusses contemporary examples from marketing, sponsorship, facility construction, and sport law to illustrate the crucial role that money, budget, and finance plays in the finance and economics of the sport business. The economics of sport teams, championships, and merchandising will also be discussed.

SPM 396 Sport Management Internship (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A sport management related work experience supervised by a sport management faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Work assignment is for a minimum of 15 hours a week. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

SPM 396A Sport Management Internship (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A sport management related work experience supervised by a sport management faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Work assignment is for a minimum of 15 hours a week. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

SPM 425 H.R. Management in Sport (3)
This course is designed to guide students toward an understanding of human resource management in the sport and recreation environment. Human Resource Management in Sport (HRMS) provides future practitioners with a solid foundation in managerial competencies, the strategic importance of human resource management in sport, and the implications of organizational justice within the context of sport. Students will explore major organizational processes in the management of human resources including organizational justice, job design, staffing and career considerations, leadership, performance appraisal, reward systems, and marketing.

SPM 440 Current Issues Business of Sport (3)
Prerequisite(s): SPM 150, SPM 185, SPM 240
This course addresses the continuing growth of the multibillion dollar sports industry and the contemporary issues and dilemmas currently facing today's sport business leaders. Overviews and insights into collegiate, professional, and Olympic sports will be discussed in the multidisciplinary context of major business disciplines such as: management, marketing, finance, information technology, ethics, and law. This course is intended to pull together all of the aspects of the sport industry and prepare the student for the internship through focused readings on current issues.

SPM 450 Special Topics:Principles of High School Athletic Admin (3)
New Course
To provide students with a realistic and practical approach to the administration of high school athletics. Students will develop a working knowledge of high school athletic department operations in areas of student athlete eligibility, staff development, event management, scheduling, community relations and facility planning.

SPM 495 Sport Management Capstone (1) CAP
Concurrent requisite(s): SPM 490
A final component of the Sport management major is the Capstone Synthesis Reflection. This essay is a culminating reflection that allows students to demonstrate the integration of their major into the broader focus of their liberal arts core and the mission of Mount Saint Joseph University. The co-requisite Internship serves as a catalyst for completion of the Capstone Synthesis Reflection required of graduating Mount St. Joseph University students in the major of Sport Management.

SPM 495S Serv Lrng:Sport Management Capstone (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SPM 495
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SPM 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A sport management related work experience supervised by a sport management faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Work assignment is for a minimum of thirty hours a week. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

SST 400 Environmental Sustainability Studies Seminar (1)
Prerequisite(s): GEO/BIO 140,ECO 211,ETH:PHI 203 and Additional 9 Credit Hours
This one hour seminar course offers the students an opportunity to hear from guest speakers who are employed in various areas related to sustainability. The course will also feature a requirement for a final integrative paper that demonstrates an understanding and integration of sustainability concepts.

SST 400S Serv Lrng:Environmental Sustainability Studies Seminar (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SST 400
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SWK 205 Play Therapy (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 and SOC 103
This course provides an overview of Play Therapy. It will address the various types of play that children engage in and the various types of therapy that can be used for working with children. This course will look at both Directive and Non Directive therapy.

SWK 219 Issues In Aging:A Social Work Perspective (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Provides base to integrate gerontology knowledge with social work education. Informal and formal support networks will be stressed as students learn to assess older clients and devise appropriate interventions.

SWK 220 Introduction to Social Work (3)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
An overview of the profession of social work and human services in health, education and welfare institutions. Includes historical development, basic concepts, as well as current trends and issues in human service systems and the social work profession.

SWK 220S Serv Lrng:Intro Social Work (1) EXP
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SWK 223 Social Policies and Issues (3) S
A problem-focused analysis of past and current social policies: income maintenance, family, educational, social service, environmental, and civil rights. Political analysis includes factors which influence policy development, policy implementation. Attention is given to local, state and federal policies.

SWK 223S Serv Lrng:Soc Pol/Iss (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SWK 223
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SWK 226 Mental Health and Social Work (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SWK 220 or SOC 103
This course offers an approach to addressing mental health issues, emphasizing the relevance of mental health. The student will be given the tools to be competent in the area of mental health case management, while exploring community systems in place for the mentally ill and the different populations affected by mental illness.

SWK 231 Spirituality and Social Work Practice (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
This course examines the experience and the role of spirituality and religious traditions in social work practice with client systems. The course considers the spiritual and religious contexts shaping assessment and intervention processes in social work services and examines the ways that faith traditions and spiritual experiences shape clients' and professionals' lives, and the points of connection they form with the delivery of social work services.

SWK 233 Ethics and Social Welfare (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103, CRM 103 or SOC 103
This course examines ethical issues as they relate to social professions and provides an overview of legal and ethical aspects in the field of social work with implications for the social worker. Includes topics such as confidentiality, rights of clients, client records, equal protection for staff and clients, and discrimination. The National Association of Social Workers code of ethics and related codes are covered with an overview of ethical dimensions of practice. The course examines various social policies, mainly federal laws, that impact society and how they influence our ethical decision-making processes.

SWK 287 Stress Awareness and Reduction (3)
Prominent theories on stress and stressors current in the field today. Indicators of stress levels within which persons can function and techniques of management and reduction of stress levels.

SWK 320 Race in America (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): 48 or more Credit Hours Earned
History and Sciences Interdisciplinary Course. Students in this course will use an interdisciplinary approach to ask questions about the idea of "race" and examine how it functions in American life, drawing on perspectives from the biological and anthropological sciences, social and behavioral sciences, ethics, history and the arts.

SWK 321 Human Behav/Soc Environment (3)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H, SOC 103, SWK 220
A variety of theoretical models are used to understand individual/family and group behaviors within society. The course features theories, concepts and research findings which build knowledge of social development and experiences in respect to age, socioeconomic class, gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and other characteristics of human diversity.

SWK 321S Serv Lrng:Hum Beh/Soc Envir (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SWK 321
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SWK 327 Interviewing and Assessment (3)
Prerequisite(s): SWK 220 and SWK 321, junior class standing
Assessment, relationship-building and problem-solving with individuals, groups and organizational systems with the emphasis on work with individuals. Students learn how to integrate knowledge and values of social work as they learn interviewing techniques and the skills of assessment, goal setting and intervention. Students are expected to participate in practice exercises and observational activities outside of class meeting time.

SWK 328 Group Approaches to Problem-solving (3)
Prerequisite(s): Junior class standing
Intervention and planning with families, groups and community systems with the emphasis on working with families and groups. Students expand their mastery of the roles that social workers play as they develop skills in forming and leading groups, developing programs and teaching problem-solving skills. Students are expected to participate in practice exercises and observational activities outside of class meeting time.

SWK 328S Serv Lrng:Group App/Prob Solving (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SWK 328
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SWK 329 Organizatn'l/Community Devel (3)
Prerequisite(s): SWK 327, junior class standing
Emphasizes organizing and planning service delivery primarily at the macro level. Students develop skills in community needs assessment and action research in monitoring programs, as well as social action on behalf of client groups. Students are expected to participate in practice exercises and observational activities outside of class meeting time.

SWK 330 Fieldwork I & Seminar (5) EXP
Prerequisite(s): SWK 327 and SOC 202, Admission to the Social Work program, and upper junior or senior class standing
The student spends two days per week in a social agency (for a total of 224 hours during the semester) under the supervision of a worker in the agency serving as field instructor. The seminar is held to help students integrate theory with practice and to guide students to address pertinent ethical and policy issues.

SWK 332 Child Abuse (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or SOC 103
Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology and Social Work Interdisciplinary Course. An examination of the interrelationship between various types of abuse and neglect and its short-term and long-term impact on the lives of children. A review of the latest research on sexual abuse, physical abuse, psychological abuse, and emotional neglect.

SWK 333 Elder Abuse (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H or SOC 103
Crosslisted GST 333. This course will explore the topic of elder abuse from multiple perspectives including the spiritual, psychological, legal, ethical, and health impact of abuse. The global, cultural, social, economic and political factors contributing to elder abuse, victim assistance and methods to prevent abuse will be discussed.

SWK 350 Special Topic Seminars (1-3)
Topics: Advocacy for the Elderly, Legal Aid Services, Special Populations, Women's Issues, etc.

SWK 358 Organizational Administration in Healthcare (3) S
Crosslisted GST 358. This course examines some of the administrative, managerial and human resources issues in the area of social community. Particular emphasis is given to the leadership function of the LTC/agency administrator in the aging and social network.

SWK 370 Addictions (3) IDS
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H, SOC 103 and Junior Class Standing
This course will explore the process of dictions. Addiction represents an intemperate relationship with an activity that has adverse biological, social, and psychological consequences for the person engaging in the behaviors. The problem of addictions will be examined from the disciplinary perspectives of medicine, psychology, sociology, social work, and political science.

SWK 375 Social Research I (4)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or PSY 103H, SOC 103, MTH 174 or MTH 175 or MTH 176
Crosslisted SOC 375. An introduction to social research emphasizing ethics and the integration of basic and applied research designs. Observations, surveys and simple experiments are carried out in conjunction with descriptive and inferential statistical analysis.

SWK 377 Eval, Res, Grantsmanship (3)
Crosslisted SOC 377. An application of basic research methods and data collection learned in Social Research I to the evaluation of existing programs in social agencies, and the tasks and skills of grant writing to develop new programs and services. Students learn how to locate grant sources, integrate program evaluation into grant proposals and practice grant writing.

SWK 377S Serv Lrng:Eval,Res,Grants (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): SWK 377
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

SWK 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

SWK 399 Independent Study (1-4)
The student fulfills the objectives of a learning contract under the supervision of a social work faculty member. Any topic which supplements or expands the student's knowledge of social work may be the focus for study. Requires approval of program director and Behavioral Sciences Department chairperson.

SWK 400 Senior Thesis (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC/SWK 375, SOC/SWK 377
Independent projects which integrate the theory and research relevant to students' areas of specialization. Thesis projects demonstrate critical thinking skills and growth in students' areas of study.

SWK 405 Behavioral Sciences Capstone (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours Core curriculum completed
A reflective, integrative experience for all majors from the Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills the university capstone requirement. Students will examine their undergraduate learning through reflection, discussion, and examination of a significant problem. Students will produce a paper and a poster presentation in which they will integrate the Baccalaureate Level Learning Outcomes with their majors and their life-long goals for learning and service.

SWK 410 Chemical Dependency Counseling (3)
New Course
This course focuses on theories and fundamentals of addictive illnesses and addictions treatments. Topics will include addiction knowledge, treatment knowledge, professionalism, evaluation, service coordination, documentation, and individual and group counseling. Designed to meet the CDCA Phase I education requirements.

SWK 432 Fieldwork II & Seminar (5) EXP
Prerequisite(s): SWK 330, SWK 375 and senior class standing
Corequisite(s): SWK 329
The student spends two days per week (or 224 hours during the semester) in a social agency under the supervision of an agency field instructor. Students take responsibility for service to clients applying the knowledge and intervention skills learned in the classroom. The seminar assists the student to integrate theory with practice, and guidance in the design and implementation of practice related research.

SWK 496 Co-Op:Alternatng(FT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined learning agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.