Mount St. Joseph University
Behavioral & Natural Sciences: Sociology And Criminology Course Descriptions

Undergraduate 2011-2012

CRM 103 Introduction to Criminal Justice System (3) (3) S
A survey of the criminal justice system and its elements: police, prosecution, courts, and corrections. Selected problems current in the system; examination of the citizen's rights and duties in the area of regulatory codes.

CRM 105 Information Literacy (1)
New Course
An introduction to Social Science communication skills. Students will learn to: proficiently use library databases to locate empirical journal articles, critically evaluate information resources and content, and properly cite references. Students will explore research and writing requirements of career professionals and articulate the ethical requirements of writing in the field.

CRM 200 Mental Illness & the CJ System (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course examines the history of deinstitutionalization and its impact on police, courts and corrections. We will examine several innovative strategies developed by criminal justice, community and mental health agencies to address the increased criminalization of the mentally ill. The advantages and disadvantages of such strategies will be considered from the perspective of a judge, prosecutor, defense attorney, police officer, and mentally ill offender.

CRM 210 Ethics in Criminal Justice (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course explores the role of ethics in criminal justice organizations and policymaking. Examines ethical issues and moral dilemmas faced by criminal justice professionals and the public's reaction to criminal justice decision making.

CRM 217 Police and Society (3) (3)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
Police and Society discusses and surveys: the role of police as formal social control agents in a stratified society; the history of policing; policing as an occupation; the impact of social change on police work; social characterstics of police; styles of policing; and police deviance.

CRM 218 Victimology (3) (3)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course provides an overview of the emerging field of victimology. The course will focus on the following topics: the scope of victimization; the societal response to victims; the role of victims in the Criminal Justice System; the resources available to victims (with a focus on the potential of Restorative Justice); and the various effects that victimization can have on the victim and on his/her relationships with others.

CRM 220 Judges, Juries, & Justice (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course will examine the function, structure, and process of the American courts system. A review of the main actors of the courtroom workgroup (i.e., prosecutor, defense attorney, and judge) and jury will be covered. This course will also provide a comprehensive examination of the pretrial and trial processes and procedures, beginning with the arrest and booking of offenders and culminating with sentencing and appeals. In addition, students will examine juvenile courts, diversion courts and critically examine issues related to the media and courts.

CRM 292 Forensic Psychology (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103
Persons with mental illness often come in contact with the legal system. This course addresses major areas of that confluence including competency, sanity at the time of the offense, involuntary hospitalization, civil litigation, child custody psychological evaluations, psychopathy as it relates to criminal behavior, and the challenges associated with being an expert witness.

CRM 295 Corrections (3) (3)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
Basic principles, history, current philosophies and methodology in corrections; survey of treatment methods and custodial care in correctional institutions; survey of other noninstitutional methods. Theory and techniques of probation and parole; interviewing and counseling in corrections; supervision and management of clients.

CRM 295H HON:Corrections (0)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
Basic principles, history, current philosophies and methodology in corrections; survey of treatment methods and custodial care in correctional institutions; survey of other noninstitutional methods. Theory and techniques of probation and parole; interviewing and counseling in corrections; supervision and management of clients.

CRM 298 Community Justice (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course provides an overview of the community justice approach to improving community quality of life, which concentrates on building collaborative partnerships in communities among non-criminal justice agencies and criminal justice agencies. The focus of the course is on the importance of informal social controls - families and other social institutions - in order to promote justice and public safety. The course reviews the importance of the community court and community corrections movements, and emphasizes the role of community oriented policing movement within the community justice movement.

CRM 300 Critical Issues in Criminology (3) S
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course approaches crime and criminality from the perspective of Critical Criminological theory and applications through a survey of issues including police misconduct, white collar crime, state corporate crime, and state sanctioned violence. Classical critical theory, contemporary research, and current events will inform discussion and debate of these issues throughout the course.

CRM 305 Interpersonal Violence (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course examines interpersonal violence concentrating on social and criminal justices responses to sexually deviant behavior. Students will develop informed analysis of sexual offenses, sexual offenders, public perceptions of and criminal justice responses to sexually deviant behavior.

CRM 310 Biosocial Criminology (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
This course examines the biosocial approach to understanding deviant behavior. Topics will include Genetics & Crime, Evolutionary Psychology & Crime, Biosocial foundations of Substance Abuse & Crime, Testosterone & Violence, Neuroscience & Career Criminality, and Implications of Biosocial Criminology on Crime Prevention.

CRM 315 Questioning Crime:Predicting, Reducing,Preventing (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course explores methods of community crime prevention (prevention outside the traditional confines of the criminal justice system). Relevant theory and research related to neighborhood efforts at crime prevention, community policing, school crime prevention, and other situational prevention measures will be explored critically. This course provides a foundation for understanding the objectives of various crime prevention efforts, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of these various strategies.

CRM 315S Serv Lrng:Questioning Crime Predicting,Reducing,Preventing (1)
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): CRM 315
Course description as stated on CRM 315

CRM 340 Mapping of Crime (3) S
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course will familiarize students with geographic concepts and techniques used in the study of crime mapping. While students will learn to map data at various levels, the focus will be on mapping local level crime. Theoretical concepts will help to inform students' understanding of spatial patterns of crime, as well as how to display and present crime data and maps, and utilize such information to explore and inform policy.

CRM 350 Selected Topics in Sociology/Social Work/Criminal Justice (1,2,3) (1-3)
Topcs vary. May be repeated once as topic changes.

CRM 350A US/UK Comp Law & Crim Justice (3) (3)
Prerequisite(s): PRL 151 or CRM 103
In this class, the student will be exposed to the law, legal process, and criminal system of the United Kingdom. The course will focus on development of the law in the United States, as it relates to the British Common Law, and compare and contrast the legal systems of these two countries. At the conclusion of this course, there will be a two-week trip to London, where students will be able to observe the British Court system.

CRM 350C Crime and the Media (3)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course examines various connections between crime and various forms of popular media. Topics to be discussed include: the manner in which various forms of media influence criminality; the effects of media portrayals of crime and crime control on the criminal justice system and society; and the effects of new forms of media on discussions of crime and criminality.

CRM 350D Social Control & Criminal Sanctions (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Examines various means by which society attempts to control the deviant and criminal conduct of its members. This course will incorporate an exploration of the formal and informal means used in contemporary societies as well as those prevalent in prior time frames. Issues regarding punishment, alternative sanctions, deterrence rationale and effectiveness, and informal within-group behavioral codes of conduct will be explored. Effectiveness of social control mechanisms and criminal sanctions will be discussed with respect to varying criminal behaviors and cultural perspectives

CRM 350E Selected Topics (1-3)
This course explores the principles and practices underlying the criminal investigation process. The course will draw upon both the theory of investigations and the current body of research to assess the effectiveness, equity and efficiency of current investigative practices.

CRM 350I Torture, Ethics & Justice (3)
New Course
This course examines definitions of torture, international and domestic law, the impact of torture as both perpetrators and survivors and the various cultural climates' responses to torture.

CRM 370 Criminological Theory (3)
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course reviews the basic concepts and principals of criminological theories; evaluates the adequacy of criminological theories as explanations of criminal and deviant behavior; promotes understanding that ideas have consequences by examining the connection between criminological theory and social policy.

CRM 375 Criminology Research I (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103, CRM 370, MTH 176 and two additional courses in CRM
An introduction to criminological research emphasizing ethics and the integration of basic and applied research designs and statistics. Observations, surveys and simple experiments are carried out in conjunction with descriptive and inferential statistical analysis.

CRM 380 Independent Study (1,2,3) (1-3)
Student-initiated project intended to add a new dimension of education and encourage intellectual activity, initiative and sustained effort. Topics to be chosen in consultation with an instructor who has special competence in the subject involved. Open to junior and senior majors. Approval of instructor required.

CRM 395 Investigations of Crime (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): CRM 103
This course explores the principles and practices underlying the criminal investigation process. The course will draw upon both the theory of investigations and the current body of research to assess the effectiveness, equity and efficiency of current investigative practices.

CRM 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience:Parallel (1,3) (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

CRM 400 Senior Thesis (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 375 or CRM 375
Independent projects which integrate the theory and research relevant to students' areas of specialization. Thesis projects demonstrate critical thinking skills and growth in students' areas of study.

CRM 401 Internship (3)
Prerequisite(s): Student must be a Criminology/Sociology major, have completed 60 hours, have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and a 3.0 GPA in the major; Student may be required to undergo a background check by the institution providing placement
This course provides practical experience in the Criminology and/or Sociology field. The student works under the supervision of professionals, learning the functions of positions in their placements. Students will work 150 hours in their internship and attend five class sessions to relate experiences, discuss ethical considerations of their placements, and to hear speakers from various placement agencies. The students are required to make a presentation of their internship activities and submit a written paper.

CRM 405 Behavioral Sciences Capstone (3) (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours Core curriculum completed
A reflective, integrative experience for all majors from the Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills the college capstone requirement. Students will examine their undergraduate learning through reflection, discussion, and examination of a significant problem. Students will produce a paper and a poster presentation in which they will integrate the Baccalaureate Level Learning Outcomes with their majors and their life-long goals for learning and service.

CRM 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience:Alternating (1-3) (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

SOC 103 Introduction to Sociology (3) (3) S
Course introduces students to the basic concepts of sociology used to analyze human societies: culture, self and role, socialization, groups, families, organizations, communities, and social institutions, such as education, religion, political, and economic. Focuses on the diversity of these forms.

SOC 103S Serv Lrng:Intro Sociology (1)
Corequisite(s): SOC 103
Course description as stated on PSY 103

SOC 201 Social Problems and Deviant Behavior (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103.
Extensive exploration of the various sociological approaches to the study of deviance and social problems. Includes such topics as changing sex roles, AIDS, euthanasia, suicide, crime, terrorism, and governmental deviance. Emphasis on contemporary theory and research.

SOC 202 Race, Class, Gender (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103.
Study of intergroup, racial and ethnic relations in America, including the cultural and political problems resulting from prejudice and discrimination.

SOC 204 Cultural Anthropology (3) S
An introduction to the study of human life and culture. Examines the beginnings of civilization, the relationship between biological and cultural evolution, and the world's cultural diversity.

SOC 204S Serv Lrng:Cult Anthropology (1)
Corequisite(s): SOC 204
Course description as stated on SOC 204

SOC 208 Social Psychology (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 or SOC 103.
The study of how we think about, relate to and influence one another. Social perception, attitudes, social influence, prejudice, aggression, and attraction are examined. Crosslisted with PSY 208.

SOC 214 Society and Politics in the Third World (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103 Crosslisted with PSC 214
The Third World is a diverse group of poor and underdeveloped countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. The course introduces you to the societies and politics of these countries. It offers theoretical perspectives used in understanding economic and political development and underdevelopment in the modern world. It discusses key economic, social, political, and cultural problems affecting developing countries. It situates the Third World in the context of the contemporary crises of the global community.

SOC 215 Sociology of Religion (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103.
Religion is studied as a social phenomenon. Social and group life impinges on religion, and religion interacts with social institutions. Such controversial topics as religious cults, religious conflict, women and religion, religion and social change are also discussed.

SOC 216 Sociology of the Family (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103.
Families and the functions of the family as a social institution are studied within the context of social and cultural forces that have an impact on them. The interdependencies of families and communities are examined.

SOC 261 Social and Psychological Aspects of Aging (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
An explanation of the basic sociological and psychological concepts and principles of aging individuals. Topics such as the social theories of aging, socialization, life course, social inequality, primary relationships, economy, the community, politics, and government will be covered.

SOC 285 Drugs in American Society: Prevention/Intervention Programs (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103.
Introduction to issues about the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol among teens, adults and elders. An examination of prevention, early intervention and treatment programs for abuses involving different ages and sexes.

SOC 292 Juvenile Delinquency (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103.
Nature of delinquent behavior; theories of causation; treatment of delinquents; recent trends in delinquency; the Juvenile Court process.

SOC 294 Criminal Law and Public Response (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 290.
Nature of regulatory codes, survey of the Criminal Code and its relationship to society at large. Efforts at revision and enforcement on federal, state and local levels.

SOC 299 Advanced Fieldwork in Criminal Justice (4, 8) (3-9)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 290 and permission of the Sociology program director.
Assignment in law enforcement, court, correctional, or other justice setting. The student functions as an intern of the agency, carrying full responsibilities and under the supervision of an agency officer and the course instructor.

SOC 300 Management/Fund Raising in Nonprofit Organization (3) (3)
Prerequisite(s): Junior status or above and permission of instructor.
Corequisite(s): SOC 300S: Service Learning: Management/Fund Raising in Nonprofit Organizations (1)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the nonprofit, philanthropic sector and expose students to many of the import aspects of nonprofit management and fund raising. The course is structured specifically to meet several of the American Humanics competency requirements for certification, including competencies within the areas of: historical and philosophical foundations, general nonprofit management, board and volunteer development and management, program planning, financial and risk management, fund raising, and career development and exploration. Service-learning in a nonprofit agency is an important aspect of the class.

SOC 335 International Politics (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103.
The course studies the major political issues and events in the contemporary world. Their historical roots are traced, and their implications for democratic peace and economic prosperity are analyzed. Particular attention is devoted to the role of the United States in this rapidly changing world. Crosslisted with PSC 335.

SOC 350 Selected Topics in Sociology/Social Work/Criminal Justice (1, 2, 3) (1-3)
Topics vary. May be repeated once as topic changes.

SOC 350D Social Control & Criminal Sanctions (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
Examines various means by which society attempts to control the deviant and criminal conduct of its members. This course will incorporate an exploration of the formal and informal means used in contemporary societies as well as those prevalent in prior time frames. Issues regarding punishment, alternative sanctions, deterrence rationale and effectiveness, and informal within-group behavioral codes of conduct will be explored. Effectiveness of social control mechanisms and criminal sanctions will be discussed with respect to varying criminal behaviors and cultural perspectives

SOC 350M Sociology of Gangs (3) S
New Course
This course examines the concept of gangs from a sociological perspective. Topics to be covered include types of gangs, interaction of gang members and their activities, as well as society's response to gangs.

SOC 370 Sociological Theories (3) (3) S
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103.
The development of sociological theories; the study of outstanding contemporary sociologists and their contributions in research, social policy and practice.

SOC 372 Collaborative Approaches Work with Clients in Soc Serv (3)

SOC 373 Sociology of Globalization (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103
This course explores diverse themes and aspects of emergent global society. Course will examine how globalization impacts individuals and societies and the development of world culture. Students will gain knowledge of and insight in processes of globalization and their consequences for cultural diversity.

SOC 374 Law and Social Identity (3)
New Course
This course examines the relationship of individuals and groups to the broader social structure through an examination of the interrelationships and tensions between law and social identity.

SOC 375 Social Research I (4) (4)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 103, SOC 103, CIS 106, MTH 175 or MTH 176, and two additional courses in PSY or SOC.
An introduction to social research emphasizing ethics and the integration of basic and applied research designs and statistics. Observations, surveys and simple experiments are carried out in conjunction with descriptive and inferential statistical analysis. Crosslisted with SWK 375.

SOC 377 Evaluation Research and Grantsmanship (3) (3)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 375.
An application of basic research methods and data collection learned in Behavioral Sciences Research Methods I to the evaluation of existing programs in social agencies, and the tasks and skills of grant writing to develop new programs and services. Students learn how to locate grant sources, integrate program evaluation into grant proposals, and practice grant writing. Crosslisted with SWK 377/ASA 377.

SOC 380 Independent Study (1, 2, 3) (1-3)
Student-initiated project intended to add a new dimension of education and encourage intellectual activity, initiative and sustained effort. Topics to be chosen in consultation with an instructor who has special competence in the subject involved. Open to junior and senior majors. Approval of instructor required.

SOC 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): CED 220.
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

SOC 400 Senior Thesis (3) (3)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 375, and 377 or PSY 376.
Independent projects which integrate the theory and research relevant to students' areas of specialization. Thesis projects demonstrate critical thinking skills and growth in students' areas of study.

SOC 405 Behavioral Sciences Capstone (3) (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours Core curriculum completed.
A reflective, integrative experience for all majors from the Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills the college capstone requirement. Students will examine their undergraduate learning through reflection, discussion, and examination of a significant problem. Students will produce a paper and a poster presentation in which they will integrate the Baccalaureate Level Learning Outcomes with their majors and their life-long goals for learning and service.

SOC 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): CED 220.
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.


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