Arts & Humanities: Liberal Arts Course Descriptions

Undergraduate 2018-2019

ASL 101 Beginning American Sign Lang. I (3) LAS
An introduction to American Sign Language communication skills, basic ASL grammar, Deaf Culture and the Deaf Community.

ASL 102 Beginning American Sign Lang.II (3) LAS
New Course
Prerequisite(s): ASL 101
This course builds on skills and knowledge introduced in ASL 101 related to communication skills, basic ASL grammar, Deaf Culture and Deaf Community.

ENG 096 Foundations of Writing (3)
Foundations of Writing prepares new students to make the transition from high school to college writing with intensive writing practice and feedback. It helps them to write more confidently and purposefully and to develop ways to clarify and edit their writing for a college-level audience.

ENG 101 Written Word (3) C
Written Word introduces new college students to academic writing with intensive writing practice and feedback. It guides them in developing strategies for communicating clearly, effectively, ethically, and creatively in a college setting. It emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking. It teaches students to discover and create knowledge by generating questions, investigating issues, and forming their own opinions.

ENG 101H HON:Written Word (3) C
Course description as stated in ENG 101 (Honors Course)

ENG 101S Serv Lrng:Written Word (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 101
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 132 In the Beginning: World Myths of Creation & Origins (3) L/CL
A survey of early old and new world creation narratives and myths contrasted with current viewpoints.

ENG 132H HON:In the Beginning: World Creation Epics (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 132H (Honors Course)

ENG 140 Survey of Women Writers (3) L/CL
A chronological study of women writers of the English-speaking world from the 15th century to the present day with emphasis upon their historical and literary significance.

ENG 142 King Arthur:The Medieval Quest (3) L/CL
This course focuses on the great adventures of medieval heroes with particular emphasis on whether they represent every individual's search for the holy grail, the meaning of life.

ENG 150 Acting Workshop (3) LAS
The Acting Workshop is designed for students who are interested in exploring the acting process by developing their improvisational, scene analysis, character development and auditioning skills. Through an innovative performing experience, students will discover various acting techniques that fuse intellect, imagination, voice, and body. The Acting Workshop will also introduce students to the fundamental rehearsal process, culminating in performances of selected scenes at a final public event. This course is designed not only for students of the theater, but also for students interested in public speaking, trial law, media, and education, as well as a broad range of other careers in which confident, fluent, and expressive communication are essential.

ENG 153 Introduction to Poetry (3) L
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent recommended
A study of the rhetoric of poetry and the chief theories about the interpretation of poetry. Emphasis is on poetry as an art form and a statement.

ENG 160 Apes, Angels & Victorians: A Survey of the Victorian Period (3) L/CL
The nineteenth century in Britain was one of rapid technological, intellectual, social, and cultural change. This course will examine Victorian literature -- fiction, poetry, and essays, along with the visual arts -- and will discuss the trends and movements over the period.

ENG 162 Murder Most Foul:Detectives in 19th Cent British Literature (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course will examine the figure of the detective and the changing nature of crime and detection in nineteenth century literature, with ample historical, sociological, and psychological background.

ENG 162H HON:Murder Most Foul:Detectives 19th Cent. British Literature (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 162 (Honors Course)

ENG 165 Literature, Nature & Environ (3) L
New Course
In this course students will examine works of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction that demonstrate ways literary artists envision and critique the relationship of humankind with the natural world. The emphasis will be on contemporary work influenced by the rise of the environmentalist movement begun in the 1960s, but the context of this recent work will be established through an introductory study of selected essays and poems by the British Romantics and the American Transcendentalists. Topics to be discussed will include ecology, political and social responses to ecological crisis, and ecofeminism.

ENG 171 Sports in Literature (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
A course that explores the significance of sports and athletes as depicted in novels, poems, short stories, essays, and film, as well as their relationship to culture and society.

ENG 173 20 Voices, 20 Countries: World Poetry (3) CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
A course that examines the work of 20 poets internationally and its impact on the world.

ENG 174 Meet Me at the Theatre: Mod & Contemp American Drama (3) L/CL
This course introduces students to classics of the American stage, beginning with O'Neill, Williams and Miller, and ending with contemporary theater. Students will read plays, view movie adaptations, and attend local productions.

ENG 174H HON:Meet Me at the Theatre: Mod & Contemp American Drama (3) L/CL
This course introduces students to classics of the American stage, beginning with O'Neill, Williams and Miller, and ending with contemporary theater. Students will read plays, view movie adaptations, and attend local productions.

ENG 175 Modern Short Fiction (3) L/CL
A study of short stories in world literature.

ENG 176 Modern Novel (3) L/CL
Readings in modern fiction emphasizing leading writers of world literature who express the concerns of modern society.

ENG 203 Great Ideas:Scripting and Performing (3) LAS
New Course
Corequisite(s): ENG 101
This course will be centered around one particularly pertinent societal concept or idea, around which students will collaborate on a play script, to be produced and performed in local school and community center settings. Students will receive instruction in playwriting, acting, set construction and design, and dramaturgy.

ENG 204 Happy Agony:18th and 19th Century British Drama (3) L
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or equivalent plus any one Drama Elective except ENG 350W, ENG 374, or ENG 397
The 18th and 19th centuries saw a major shift in drama as an art form in Britain. As the comedies of the Restoration lost favor, English theatre became more focused on tragedies and operas and music hall extravaganzas, while the theatre of the Victorian period involved longer runs (due to the increase in leisure time after industrialization and to the ease of transportation both outside and within cities) and became denser and more political, as in the works of writers such as Wilde, Ibsen and Bernard Shaw. The goal of this course is to acquaint students with major works from these two centuries, focusing in particular on the changing nature of the British audience and on how the theatre reflected political and social change.

ENG 206 State of the Unions:20th Century British and American Drama (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
The course, 20th Century World Drama, will explore a variety of plays, dramatic monologues, and performance art that encompasses an international perspective. The course will examine ways in which these dramas and artistic visions have shaped or influenced their respective cultures and society.

ENG 206H HON:State of the Unions:20th Century British and American Drama (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 206 (Honors Course)

ENG 207 Teenage Wasteland:The Literature of Adolescence (3) CL
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Examines the adolescent character in contemporary fiction as a reflection of the critically important period of personal development it has come to be in American culture, but also as a rich metaphor in literature, that helps readers examine a state of contradictions and a search for balance.

ENG 223 Cincinnati Authors (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent
This course examines significant literary works in a variety of genres by writers who are either native Cincinnatians or who have resided in Cincinnati for a period of time.

ENG 225 Women and Autobiographical Writing (3) L
This course examines the literary form of women's personal writing - diary, autobiography, memoir, letters - as well as alternate forms such as poetry, fiction, oral history, and the arts. Through autobiographical formats, perceptions of women in society as well as the common experiences of women's lives will be studied.

ENG 226 Multicultural Women Writers (3) L
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent
This course examines the variety of ways multicultural women writers express their evolving identities and their culture.

ENG 245 African-American Writers (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101/or Equiv.
This course surveys significant works by African-American writers, beginning with slave narratives and ending with contemporary novels.

ENG 245H Honors: African-American Writers (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent, IDS 100H Honors Seminar I and approval of the Honors Program Director
This course surveys significant works by African-American writers, beginning with slave narratives and ending with contemporary novels.

ENG 245S Ser Lrn:African-American Writers (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 245
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 260 19th-Century American Thought in Prose (3) L/CL/H/CH
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course examines significant historical documents and literature of the late 18th century and the first half of the 19th century in America, with special emphasis on how issues and ideas they present are interpreted through genres such as speeches, letters, political documents, essays, poetry, and fiction.

ENG 260H HON:19th-Century American Thought in Prose (0) L/CL/H/CH
Course description as stated in ENG 260 (Honors Course)

ENG 262 I Was Crazy Once:Impaired Mind in Lit (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
In this course we will examine 19th century literary depictions of madness and impairment and discuss how they illuminate 19th-century advances in science and medicine as well as 19th century assumptions about class. We will look at fiction, poetry and nonfiction.

ENG 262H HON:I Was Crazy Once:Impaired Mind in Lit (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 262 (Honors Course)

ENG 273 The Classical World (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
Crosslisted HIS 273. This course introduces the student to the Greco-Roman views of the world through a study of the history, philosophy, art, and literature of classical antiquity.

ENG 275 A History of Violence: Survey of 20th-Cent British Literature (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
This course will examine broad movements in twentieth century British literature-fiction, poetry, essays, and drama-that reflect the violent political and social upheavals of that era. We will discuss the historical, social, and cultural backdrop to these works.

ENG 276 The 20th-Century Graphic Novel (3) L/CL
Since the term "Graphic Novel" was first introduced as a label to describe a "new" genre of fiction, what that term really means and whether or not "books" that are written in such a format are really works of literature has been hotly contested. In this course we will look at graphic novels and a few film adaptations to reach the truth about the form and to understand the freedoms and advantages of the artistic medium as well as its significance to the canon of contemporary fiction.

ENG 276H HON:The 20th-Century Graphic Novel (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 276 (Honors Course)

ENG 276S Serv Lrng:The 20th-Century Graphic Novel (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 276
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 277 Dollars & Sense: Materialism in 20th-Century American Fiction (3) L/CL
This course will examine how the literature of the twentieth century examines materialism from the notion of the American dream to the realities of corporate greed.

ENG 277H HON:Dollars & Sense: Materialism in 20th Century American Fiction (0) L
Course description as stated in ENG 277 (Honors Course)

ENG 278 The End of the World as We Know It: Fiction After 9/11 (3) L/CL
This course will look at literature that examines the relationship that the United States has with the rest of the world, look at literature that recognizes life's dangers, and examine what such literature reflects about the times in which we currently live.

ENG 278H HON: The End of the World as We Know It: Fiction After 9/11 (0) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 278 (Honors Course)

ENG 279 Killing the Angel in the House: 20th-Cent Brit Women Novelists (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course will examine British women writers from the twentieth century, and discuss the ways in which they broke literary molds and led often daring, even scandalous, personal lives-"killing the angel in the house" or getting beyond the need to please a male audience.

ENG 280 In Their Own Voices: American Autobiography,Letters,Memoirs (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course examines first-person writing of Americans from the 18th-century to the present. Students will explore issues in American life and thought through autobiographies, letters and memoirs.

ENG 280H HON:In Their Own Voices:American Autobiography,Letters,Memoirs (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course examines first-person writing of Americans from the 18th-century to the present. Students will explore issues in American life and thought through autobiographies, letters and memoirs.

ENG 280S Serv Lrng: In Their Own Voices: American Autobiography, Letters,Memoirs (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 280
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 290 The Story of Your Life: Writing Diaries, Memoirs & Autobiographies (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101, 100-level literature course
This course will examine multiple techniques for writing about your own life. Students will produce substantial diary writing, and will shape a final manuscript of either a diary, memoir, or autobiography.

ENG 300 Advanced Composition (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent; COM 200 recommended
Crosslisted COM 300. A course in writing nonfiction. While most of the work is practical, some theoretical considerations are made regarding style and methods of adapting discourse to meet the needs of a variety of audiences. Writing assignments involve descriptive, expository and persuasive writing.

ENG 300S Serv Lrng:Adv Composition (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 300
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 301 The Past in Stages:A History of Theatre in Society (3) L
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or equivalent plus any one Drama Elective except ENG 350W, ENG 374, or ENG 397
From its origins in ancient tribal cultures, theatre has thrilled, chilled, angered, tickled, taught, moved, mocked, entertained, and otherwise performed the shared experience of being human. This upper-level course is a study of the history of the theatre as a social institution, tracing the ways that audiences, actors, and other producers have shaped the theatrical event to meet changing times and needs. Theatre history from the Greeks to the present is considered, with an emphasis on the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.

ENG 303 The School for Scandal: Restoration Comedy (3) L
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or equivalent plus any one Drama Elective except ENG 350W, ENG 374, or ENG 397
Restoration Comedy refers to the form of comedic theatre written and produced after the restoration of Charles II in England (roughly 1660-1700), and features bawdy situations, loose morals, and plots bursting with rakes, villains, and scoundrels. The goal of this course is to acquaint students with the major works of the period, and to address issues of audience, politics, gender, and societal norms.

ENG 350 Topics in Literature (1-3)
Special seminars, guided readings, minicourses of five or 10-week duration.

ENG 350H Cincinnati Authors (3)
Course description as stated in ENG 350 (Honors Course)

ENG 350X Literature for Teaching (3)
New Course

ENG 353 Topics:Literary Monsters Past & Present (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): ENG/COM 101
This course will examine literary texts and films dealing with monsters both literal and figurative, and discuss the ways in which monsters in literature tell us both what we ourselves are, and what we are not.

ENG 353H HON:Topics in Literature Vampires in Literature (3) L/CL
Course description as stated in ENG 353 (Honors Course)

ENG 354 Literary London (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
This course will survey British literature and will culminate in a trip to London. The focus of the course will be around the national character of British thought and the unique contributions that England has made to Western thought in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

ENG 359 American Film Authors (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 100, COM/ENG 101/or Equiv
Crosslisted COM 359. An in-depth study of major American film directors. The styles and major traits of these directors will be stressed through close examination of representative films. The course also addresses filmmaking as a collaborative art, examining the role of stars, writers, producers, and studios. Films and filmmakers will be placed within historical, sociological, and cultural contexts.

ENG 360 The Play's the Thing: Shakespeare's Major Works (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course will examine selected comedies, tragedies and histories from Shakespeare's body of work, and will include significant discussion of Shakespeare's life and times, situating him and his work in historical context.

ENG 370 Creative Writing: Poetry (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent
This course examines methods, models and practice in poetry writing.

ENG 371 Seminar in Creative Writing: Poetry (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): ENG 370 or equivalent
This course provides advanced study of methods, models and practice in poetry writing.

ENG 371S Serv Lrng:Sem Creative Writing:Poetry (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ENG 371
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ENG 372 Creative Writing: Fiction (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101 or equivalent
This course examines methods, models and practice in fiction writing.

ENG 372H HON:Creative Writing: Fiction (0) LAS
Course description as stated in ENG 372 (Honors Course)

ENG 373 Sem Creative Writing:Fiction (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): ENG 372 or equivalent
This course provides an advanced study of methods, models and practice in fiction writing.

ENG 374 Screenwriting Workshop (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
A course focusing on the craft of writing a full-length feature script (screenplay) and on the basic fundamentals of casting, filming, and editing scenes using digital editing equipment.

ENG 376 Novels Without Borders (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
In this class we will read fiction from former colonies such as the Caribbean, India, Africa, or elsewhere and examine where cultures clash, refuse each other, contaminate each other, uplift each other and control one another.

ENG 388 Feature Writing (3) LAS
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and ENG 101
This course stresses the craft of newspaper and magazine feature writing, with attention to leads, structure and polished prose, and ethics.

ENG 390 Independent Study (1-3)
Student-initiated research, project or creative work under faculty guidance. Permission of department required.

ENG 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

ENG 397 Theater Production (1-3) L
Students may earn up to 3 credits toward their English major with a concentration in drama over the course of their studies at the College by participating in student drama productions housed in the Department of English and Modern Languages. Variable credit: 1-3 credits. Learning contract required.

ENG 441Z Advanced Creative Writing (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor
An Auto-Study course.

ENG 461 Writing for Publication (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): COM 101; COM 388 recommended
This course gives student advanced practice in feature writing, with emphasis on skills for placing their work in publications.

ENG 461Z Writing for Publication (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor
An Auto-Study course.

ENG 496 Co-Op:Alternating(FT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work-related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded on successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

ENG 499 English Senior Seminar Capstone (1) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours of Core curriculum completed and Senior Status
In this capstone/seminar experience the student will reflect on and integrate what he/she has learned in the study of literature and of the liberal arts and sciences.

ETH:PHI 203 Environmental Ethics (3) E/CE
This course is an introduction to the ethical features of the human relationship with the natural environment. In addition to the deontological, utilitarian, and virtue ethical perspectives on this environmental relation, this course will consider various approaches to environmental value, e.g., anthropocentrism, biocentrism, and ecocentrism, in an effort to identify and clarify potential obligations that moral agents have toward the natural environment. These theoretical considerations will be raised through an exposure to contemporary environmental problems, e.g., climate change, animal treatment, pollution, food production, and waste management.

ETH:PHI 203H HON:Environmental Ethics (0) E/CE
Course description as stated in ETH:PHI 203(Honors Course)u

ETH:PHI 203S Serv Lrng:Environmental Ethics (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ETH:PHI 203
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ETH:PHI 204 Contemporary Moral Debate (3) E/CE
This course takes an interdisciplinary, case-study approach to practical contemporary ethical issues in education, engineering, law, medicine, personal relationships, politics, etc. It focuses on the process or articulating one's own moral judgments on a variety of case studies and cultivating the necessary skills to defend those judgments.

ETH:PHI 240 Ethics (3) E/CE
This course is a study of the major ethical theories of the Western tradition. The action-based approach and the virtue-based approach will be covered. Fulfills Ethics requirement.

ETH:PHI 250 Health Care Ethics (3) E/CE
This course is a study of major ethical principles and their application to health care issues. Emphasis is on the method of decision making and health care policy. Fulfills Ethics requirement.

ETH:PHI 250S Serv Lrng:Health Care Ethics (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ETH:PHI 250
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ETH:PHI 397 Ethical Conduct of Business (3) E/CE
This course examines the moral dilemmas raised by the conduct of business. Topics to be discussed include: product safety, truth advertising, fair pricing, pollution, sexual harassment, and affirmative action. Fulfills Ethics requirement.

ETH:PHI 397H HON: Ethical Conduct of Business (0) E/CE
Course description as stated in ETH:PHI 397 (Honors Course)

ETH:REL 250 Christian Ethics (3) E
This course introduces students to the study of Christian ethics from the Catholic theological perspective. We begin by exploring the foundations of Christian ethics: the nature of the good, the relationship between faith and reason, and the importance of both free will and rightly formed conscience. We then focus on specific topics, chosen by students, in the areas of social, medical, and sexual ethics. For each of the chosen topics, we discuss the underlying moral principles and seek to articulate an appropriate Christian response to them.

ETH:REL 250S Serv Lrng:Christian Ethics (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ETH:REL 250
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ETH:REL 251 Business Ethics (3) E/CE
This course is designed to offer students an introduction to the study of business ethics from both a philosophical and theological perspective. We begin by examining 1) foundational philosophical theories and 2) the principles of Catholic Social Teaching and demonstrate how each is related to ethical business activity. We then focus on specific challenges concerning - but not limited to - corporate governance, socially responsible investing, product safety, truth in advertising, and doing business in an international context. For each of these challenges, we discuss the underlying moral principles and seek to articulate appropriate philosophical and theological responses to them.

ETH:REL 252 Theological Health Care Ethics (3) E/CE
This course offers students an introduction to the study of health care ethics from the Catholic theological perspective. We begin by exploring foundational topics such as the relationship between faith and reason and the moral principles that govern the patient-professional relationship. We then focus on ethical challenges concerning particular health care topics. These topics include-but are not limited to-determining when human life begins (and its associated implications for medicine), treatment for critically ill newborns, genetic screening/testing, and the duties of health care professionals with regard to end of life care. The course seeks to help students, and in turn the patients for whom they will care, formulate appropriate responses to the many ethical challenges they will face in the health care field.

ETH:REL 256 Sexual and Reproductive Ethics (3) E/CE
Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing or Above
Human sexuality and reproduction are two controversial and often misunderstood topics. This course offers students an opportunity to reflect upon issues concerning sexuality and reproduction in light of the Catholic moral tradition, and it encourages students to critically evaluate the teachings of the Catholic tradition from their own philosophical and theological perspectives.

ETH:REL 269 Environmental Ethics:A Call to Conscience in a Time of Climate Change (3) E/CE
In a time when the adverse effects of anthropogenic climate change are beginning to be felt, this course will examine how to respond to a call to conscience from a Catholic theological perspective. We will explore the principles of faith and reason and the resources of the Catholic tradition regarding stewardship, the common good, and the option for the poor and vulnerable as they relate to climate change. In analyzing contemporary environmental problems, we will engage in dialogue in order to seek personal and social courses of action to care for creation.

ETH:REL 269S Serv Lrng:Environmental Ethics:A Call to Conscience in a Time of Climate Change (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): ETH:REL 269
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

ETH:REL 342 Ethics in Ministry (3) E
New Course
One of the pastoral minister's many functions is to educate people in their faith, and one of the most challenging times this must be done is when a person is facing an important ethical decision. Poignant ethical questions face us every day and for many people they pose significant challenges of faith. In this course, we explore the field of Catholic theological ethics. Students will examine the foundations of the Church's ethical tradition and propose a "code of ethics" for the pastoral minister. We then explore a number of "critical issues" from three primary topic areas: social ethics, sexual ethics, and medical ethics. The overall purpose of this course is to offer the pastoral minister 1) knowledge of what the Roman Catholic Church teaches concerning pressing ethical issues, as well as why it teaches what it does; and 2) a foundation upon which to draw when faced with the question "What should I do?" in light of a particular ethical dilemma.

HIS 105 World Civilization to 1500 (3) H/CH
A study of the development of the early cultures and civilizations of the world from their beginnings to approximately 1500 CE.

HIS 106 World Civilization Since 1500 (3) H/CH
A study of the development of the cultures and civilizations of the world from approximately 1500 CE to the present

HIS 107 European Civilization to 1500 (3) H/CH
In order to better understand current issues facing the industrialized world, one must understand the ideas, values, events and persons critical to the development of European civilization. As we examine European history from the late Roman Empire to the early Renaissance, we will begin to understand the major concepts of humanity and society as defined in Europe and how these both unified and divided its inhabitants.

HIS 108 European Civilization Since 1500 (3) H/CH
A survey of European culture from the Renaissance to the present.

HIS 109 U.S. History to 1877 (3) H/CH
This course surveys the political, economic, and cultural forces that transformed North American British colonies into the United States of America through the first century of the nation's existence. Topics include colonial development, the Revolutionary War, issues of race, class, and gender facing the early Republic, sectional tensions culminating in the Civil War, and attempts at Reconstruction following war's end. An emphasis is placed on interpreting historical sources.

HIS 109S Serv Lrng:U.S. Hist to 1877 (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 109
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 110 U.S. History Since 1877 (3) H/CH
This course examines the political, economic, and social forces that have directed American development from Reconstruction to the present. An emphasis is placed upon interpreting historical sources.

HIS 110H HON:U.S. History Since 1877 (0) H/CH
Course description as stated in HIS 110 (Honors Course)

HIS 110S Serv Lrng:U.S. Hist Since 1877 (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 110
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 200 Local History (3) H/CH
This course explores the development of the Greater Cincinnati area, primarily from the late eighteen century to the present, using the Cincinnati region as a model for discussing American urban growth in general. It considers the people, places, events, and issues that formed this small but hugely significant part of the country and discusses how they helped to shape and were shaped by the larger history of the United States of America.

HIS 200S Serv Lrng:Local History (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 200
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 211 U.S. History Since 1945 (3) H/CH
This course is an examination of American society during the seven decades following World War II. Among the topics considered are the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War, the counterculture, feminism, and modern conservatism.

HIS 211S Serv Lrng:U.S.His Since 1945 (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 211
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 215 The Second Rome:Byzantine Empire (3) H
New Course
Corequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
An examination of the Byzantine Empire and its relation to the Medieval Mediterranean, Islamic and Slavic worlds

HIS 225 The Best of Both Worlds: The Ottoman Empire (3) H
New Course
Corequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
An examination of the Ottoman Empire and its influence on the Medieval and Early Modern European, Islamic and Slavic worlds.

HIS 230 Competing Identities:The Modern Middle East (3) H/CH
This course examines the conflicting ideas, people, and events that created the contemporary Middle East out of the former Ottoman Empire after World War I. Emphasis is placed on using primary documents as historical sources.

HIS 235 Before Columbus: The Native Americas (3) H
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
An examination of native North and South American civilizations before European contact in 1492

HIS 236 From Cortez to Costco Impact of European Contact with the Americas on the Food We Eat (3) H/CH
This course examines the effects of European contact with the Americas on global biodiversity from the 15th century to the present.

HIS 240 Dar Al-Islam: Early Islamic Culture (3) H
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
An examination of the rise and development of the early Islamic caliphates to the beginning of the Ottoman period.

HIS 260 19th Century American Thought In Prose (3) L/CL/H/CH
New Course
Corequisite(s): COM/ENG 101
This course examines significant historical and documents and literature of the late 18th century and the first half of the 19th century in America, with special emphasis on how issues and ideas they present are interpreted through genres such as speeches, letters, political documents, essays, poetry, and fiction.

HIS 270 Nihilism, Nuremberg & Nukes Europe in the 20th Century (3) H/CH
New Course
Prerequisite(s): HIS 108 Recommended
This course examines the social and cultural history of Europe in the 20th century, paying particular attention to the ways in which the arts reflect responses to war, peace, and politics.

HIS 271 Science, Technology & Gender in the Modern Age (3) H
New Course
This course examines the development, distribution, and application of technology and whether or not ideas regarding gender are a factor.

HIS 273 The Classical World (3) LAS
Crosslisted ENG 273. This course introduces the student to the Greco-Roman views of the world through a study of the history, philosophy, art, and literature of classical antiquity.

HIS 281 Women in American History (3) H
This course is a study of women's experiences in American history, Native American and colonial women to the 21st century.

HIS 282 Women in European History 1500 to Present (3) H
New Course
This course examines the experience of women in Europe and Europe's colonial holdings from the Renaissance to the present, and how sex, gender, race and class affected women's experience.

HIS 295 Punch Lines & Pratfalls History of American Humor (3) H
Prerequisite(s): HIS 110 or HIS 211
What's so funny? This course examines the various ways that Americans have answered this question from the founding of the Republic to the present, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. The evolution of a uniquely American humor, as well as its performance and reception, is analyzed not only as an expression of popular culture but also as a particularly potent articulation of democracy.

HIS 305 Before Writing: World Pre-History (3) H
New Course
Prerequisite(s): COM 100 and COM/ENG 101
An examination of pre-bronze and -iron age cultures found in the Old and New Worlds.

HIS 326 The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment (3) CH
New Course
An examination of the period between 1500 and 1789, focusing on the development of "science" and how it shaped ideas about humans and their world.

HIS 330 American Foreign Relations (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): HIS 110 or HIS 211 Recommended
Crosslisted PSC 330. This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of American foreign relations from the early days of the Republic until the present. An emphasis will be placed upon the emergence of the United States as a world power in the 20th century.

HIS 345 The Revolutionary Tradition in France (3) H
New Course
Students will examine the use of revolution as a means of political and social change in France from 1789 to 1900.

HIS 361 Contemporary Japan and its Roots (3) CH
This course explores the impact of pre-modern Japan on contemporary Japanese history and culture. The class culminates in a twelve-day trip to Japan. Students will explore the country's fine arts, history, culture, and religious beliefs from the Edo Era (1615-1868) to the present. They will learn how these forces influenced contemporary Japanese art and cultural life.

HIS 379 Oral History and the Aging Process (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor
Crosslisted GST 379. This course introduces the student to the methods of oral history by examining America's recent past through interviews with those who have lived through it. An emphasis is placed on how the aging process affects memory and recollection.

HIS 385 Sea, Sail & Song: Early American Maritime History (3) H/CH/EXP
Prerequisite(s): 15 or more credit hours earned and min 2.0 cum GPA
This immersion course will feature travel to the coast of Maine this summer to explore the development of early national identity through Americans' extensive reliance on water, especially the ocean. Together we will study how life on various frontiers--between land and sea and between native American and European cultures--created new ideas concerning individualism, independence, and eventually, a new American character. Particular attention will be paid to how this process was expressed through folk music. Activities will include music workshops, service at a seventeenth century archaeological site, kayaking, and an overnight sail on a historic two-masted schooner.

HIS 385S Serv Lrng:Sea,Sail & Song:Early American Maritime History (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): HIS 385
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

HIS 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
This course is a history-related work experience supervised by a Humanities Department coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

HIS 398 Internship at the Cincinnati Historical Society (1-4)
This course offers practical experience in photographic arrangement and preservation, exhibit preparation, manuscript processing, reference correspondence, and work with printed materials and the education system.

HIS 400 American History Seminar (3)
The seminar in American history provides the student with an opportunity to research a particular topic in American history and write a paper of significant length.

HIS 401 European History Seminar (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours completed in the CORE curriculum, plus a minimum of nine hours in European History
The European History Seminar not only provides the students with an opportunity to research and write a paper of significant length on a particular topic in European history, but also gives the students the opportunity to assess the six baccalaureate degree learning outcomes that have been an integral part of their college learning experience.

HIS 410Z Roman History (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor is required
This course is a study of how Rome developed from a small settlement on the Tiber to become master of the Mediterranean. An Auto-Study course.

HIS 415Z History of India (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor is required
This course is an examination of the historical development of India with particular emphasis on the relationship of its religious tradition to its political and cultural uniqueness. An Auto-Study course.

HIS 480 Directed Independent Study (1-4)
This individualized course allows for reading, research, or creative work on a selected era or aspect of history.

HIS 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
This is a history-related work experience supervised by a Humanities Department coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. Course may be repeated up to six credit hours.

JCG 200 Disabling Theology (3) JCG
Prerequisite(s): Religion Course and SOC 103
Using a practical theological method that dialogues between theology and experience, this course explores the social injustice of ableism, as well as the search for the common good, in relationship to persons who are differently abled in body, mind, and/or psyche.

JCG 200H HON:Disabling Theology (0) JCG
Course description as stated in JCG 200 (Honors Course)

JCG 200S Serv Lrng:Disabling Theology (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 200
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 250 The Holocaust (3) JCG/IDS
This course is an exploration of the historical event called the Holocaust and its far reaching consequences. During the course, students will become familiar with what happened, move on to the question of "why", and conclude with a deeper understanding of the implications of these events for the present and future. While the Holocaust can be approached from many angles and perspectives, this course will focus much of its attention on examining questions that emerge in light of the Holocaust about ethics, the meaningful pursuit of justice, and the human capacity for both good and evil.

JCG 250H HON:The Holocaust (0) JCG/IDS
Course description as stated in JCG 250 (Honors Course)

JCG 255 Christian Social Justice (3) JCG
This course will acquaint students with both concrete efforts by Christians in support of social justice and with the Christian premises that underlie these efforts. Topics include economic justice, religious liberty and church-state relations, rights of women and minorities, war and peace, pro-life issues, and environmental ethics.

JCG 255S Serv Lrng:Christian Social Justice (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 255
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 256 Hands Up, Don't Shoot:Practical Theology for Racial Justice (3) JCG
Prerequisite(s): SOC 103 and any 100 Level Religion
This course examines the social injustices of racism and ethnocentrism from theological perspectives. Methods of practical theology are used to develop reflexive theological habits for critical analysis and social action.

JCG 256S Serv Lrng:Hands Up, Don't Shoot:Practical Theology for Racial Justice (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 256
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 266 A Land Where You Can Eat: Sustainable Foodways and Christian Spirituality (3) JCG
This course examines food production, distribution, and consumption using practical theological method. Students develop a spirituality of just food, paying special attention to social structures and individual choices that promote and/or inhibit sustainable foodways.

JCG 266S Serv Lrng:A Land Where You Can Eat:Sustainable Foodways and Christian Spirituality (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 266
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 267 Healing and Loving Creation:An Ecological Spirituality for Our Time (3) JCG
Discipleship in our modern world increasingly necessitates an ecological commitment to embrace a green lifestyle. God's fidelity to "renew the face of Earth" as a planet of peace and compassion inspires new ways of thinking about and responding to the dignity of all creation. We will consider the contemplative encounter with God in nature that compels us to embrace our potential as co-creators, loving and healing Earth.

JCG 268 Bringing about a Sustainable Reign of God (3) JCG
This course explores why we are called to live more sustainably and gives practical ways to live that are more in keeping with Gospel teaching. We will look at the signs of times in which we are now living and apply Jesus' message of love and compassion towards all of God's creation. We will also look at ways in which we can spread this message to others.

JCG 390 Appalachian Culture & Spirit (3) JCG/IDS
Prerequisite(s): 100 level REL and SOC 103, and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Crosslisted IDS 390. This course will be a field experience in the Appalachian Mountains in Kentucky and will focus on understanding Appalachian Culture and Religion. We will examine how culture affects religion, how religion affects culture, and explore how the dynamic interplay of these two can affect personal religious development, lifestyle, behavior and family, social, ecological, economic and political systems. Special attention will be focused on social analysis of the poverty in Appalachia, issues of social and environmental justice, and exploration of strategies for future sustainability in the region. The course can be taken for graduate, undergraduate, Honors and Service Learning credit. Five classroom sessions will be conducted to develop the academic learning of the experience.

JCG 390S Serv Lrng: Appalachian Culture (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 390
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

JCG 391 Cherokee Culture and Spirituality:Immersion (3) JCG/IDS
Prerequisite(s): 100 level REL and SOC 103 and minimum 2.0 cum GPA
Crosslisted IDS 391. This course includes a one week trip the Cherokee Qualla Boundary in North Carolina. As a comprehensive exploration into justice and the common good students will meet with Cherokee guides who teach us about Native American life from their vantage point. We will see multi-faceted examples of how working for justice is a cornerstone of today's Cherokee.

JCG 391S Serv Lrng:Cherokee Culture (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): JCG 391
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

LIB 115 Foundations of the Liberal Arts (3)
A three-credit introduction to the history and concerns of the liberal arts, which arose in Greco-Roman antiquity when ideas about political engagement required persons educated in critical thinking and citizenship. Students will explore this history and will practice identifying and analyzing enduring complex questions that the liberal arts both shape and help to answer.

LIB 280 Conference Planning and Assistance (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Students will assist faculty with planning an academic conference, hosted at the Mount including content development, logistics, promotion, etc.

LIB 290 Research and Bibliography (0-3)
New Course
Student will assist faculty member with an existing research project, including research, indexing, bibliographical work etc.

LIB 300 Seriously Funny:The Liberal Art of Humor (3)
Prerequisite(s): 21 Hours Completed in the Major
With humor so widespread in our social world, affecting our relationships, reflecting our attitudes, influencing our politics, and used to sell us everything from Acura's to Zumba classes, having only a "sense" of humor is not enough. This seminar closely examines the phenomenon of humor, explores various motives for creating, using, and abusing it, analyzes how it is transmitted and received by diverse groups, and considers its diverse effects on the common good. By studying humor from multiple perspectives, including history, the arts, literature, economics, philosophy, politics, the media, and more, we can become more critical consumers, compassionate neighbors, and empowered citizens.

LIB 301 The Loving Friends:The Bloomsbury Group (3)
Prerequisite(s): 21 hours complete in the major
This seminar will examine the lives and works of the members of the Bloomsbury Group, a collection of artists, writers, thinkers, politicians, critics, and journalists who came to prominence in the 1910s and 1920s in London, so named for the London neighborhood in which most of them lived and worked. The Group had a profound effect on British culture, and their influence is still felt today. We will examine works by Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, John Maynard Keynes, Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Roger Fry, Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf, Desmond McCarthy, Katherine Mansfield, T. S. Eliot, Vita Sackville-West and Carrington, and will view the Group in light of its influences and predecessors, such as Matthew Arnold, Oscar Wilde, G. E. Moore, and Walter Pater. Students will be able to choose a specific Group member on whom to complete an in-depth final project.

LIB 302 Ree/al or Not Ree/al:The History of the Documentary as History (3)
Prerequisite(s): 21 Credit Hours toward Liberal Arts Major
Documentary films compel us to believe that they represent the real world as it really is. They arise from real life events that occur in real time; yet, the films, as well as the film makers, are representing an historical phenomenon by choosing who or what is presented, how it is presented, and what sources are used to support their particular re-telling of the past-much like a traditional, written history. Yet the documentary film employs powerful visual and auditory components not present in traditional, written histories to convince viewers to accept its particular point of view. Students in this seminar course will, while examining documentary film from its beginnings in the early 20th century to the present, learn the techniques used by documentarians to tell their stories. They will then analyze a series of films from the 1910's through the 21st century in order to address the overall course question.

LIB 303 Oy Vey:Contemporary Jewish Literature (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): 21 Credits Hours toward the Libral Arts Major
Many religious scholars have noted that a Jew can be many different things at once and those scholars often argue that to doubt one's faith is very Jewish thing. What does it mean to be Jewish at a time during which nearly 2/3 of Jews define themselves as more secular than religious as "Just Jewish"? In this course we will explore such a question as well as representations of cultural transformation and significant periods of Jewish experience through contemporary literature (mostly 20th and 21st century): fiction, poetry, drama, memoir, film and philosophy. This course is devoted to the cultural, the artistic, the secular and the spiritual, to the literature that reflects deeply held traditions and the literature that has been produced by those who identify as "just".

LIB 304 Addiction and the Spiritual Life (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): 21 Credit Hours toward Liberal Arts Major or Instructor Approval
This Liberal Arts Seminar will explore the reality of addiction in the 21st century. The course considers how the desires of people and societies can lead to unhealthy forms of addiction. These pathological relationships can be analyzed with resources related to scientific, theological, and philosophical perspectives. Students will therefore study the phenomenon of addiction in an interdisciplinary way in order to discern how addiction is intimately connected to the anthropological universal of ultimate meaning and purpose in life.

LIB 304H HON: Addiction and the Spiritual Life (0)
New Course
Course description as stated in LIB 304 (Honors Course)

LIB 304S Serv Lrng: Addiction and the Spiritual Life (1) EXP
New Course
Concurrent requisite(s): LIB 304
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

LIB 305 Aesthetics:The Philosophy of Beauty (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): 21 Hours toward the Liberal Arts Major
This course analyzes the concept of beauty through a philosophical lens. This analysis involves considering the definition of beauty from multiple perspectives including artistic, historical, and scientific views. Contrast concepts such as ugliness and the sublime will also be considered.

LIB 390 America at Play:Baseball, Bare Knuckles, and Back Seats (3)
This seminar examines American society and culture through an exploration of the history of sports, recreation, and leisure. An emphasis is placed upon how these activities affect class identity, gender construction, and race relations. The impact of an emerging mass consumer society is also explored.

LIB 396 Co-Op:Parallel(PT) (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A business related work experience supervised by a business faculty member in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded as a general elective upon completion of the work experience and documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis. The course may be repeated as a general elective up to nine credit hours.

LIB 400 Liberal Arts Culminating Experience (3)
Prerequisite(s): Six Hours of Liberal Arts Seminar Coursework
The culminating course is designed to demonstrate the student's strong command of the learning outcomes and performance indicators associated with the Liberal Arts major. Working closely with peers and a faculty scholar, the student will compose a research question of significance and depth, conduct research and apply critical analysis from across the Liberal Arts in addressing the question, craft a twelve-to-fifteen-page paper presenting his or her findings, and articulate those findings to the wider University community.

PHI 140 Philosophical Point of View (3) P/CP
This course provides the student with an understanding of the particular perspective from which philosophers consider the world and human experience.

PHI 140H HON:Philosophical Point of view (0) P/CP
Course description as stated in PHI 140 (Honors Course)

PHI 200 Perspectives on Human Nature (3) P/CP
This course emphasizes the importance of our views concerning what it means to be human and the effect of these views on human experience and personal identity. Attention will be given to major views within the history of philosophy or to various ways humanity relates to the world.

PHI 205 Philosophy of Mind (3) P/CP
This course introduces students to contemporary and historical perspectives on the mind and its relation to the brain. Topics such as thought, language, emotion, mental causation, and consciousness will be explored.

PHI 205S Serv Lrng:Philosophy of Mind (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): PHI 205
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

PHI 220 Political Philosophy (3) CP
An examination of major political theories and ideologies from antiquity to modern times. Among the writers considered: Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Edmund Burke, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Henry David Thoreau, and Mohandas Gandhi.

PHI 285 Philosophy of Art (3) P/CP
This course investigates the place of art in life as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on the function of art, the nature of art, and major theories of art as presented in the Eastern and Western philosophical traditions.

PHI 398 Independent Study (1-3) LAS
This course is designed for students who wish to study an area of their own interest independently. Permission of an instructor is required.

PHI 413Z Community & the Individual (3)
Prerequisite(s): Approval of instructor
An Auto-Study course.

REL 100 Introduction to Christianity (3) R/CR
The Jesus of faith serves as a starting point to explore contemporary and global expressions of Christianity, a major world religion. Christian history and doctrine will be explored in light of Christian practice.

REL 100S Serv Lrng:Intro to Christianity (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 100
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 101 Introduction to Religion (3) R/CR
This course is an examination of how fundamental religious questions arise out of human experience and the variety of ways that people respond to those questions. Attention will be given to both historic and contemporary expressions of religious concern. Concepts of God, faith, religious experience, and theological reflection will be among the topics examined.

REL 101S Serv Lrng:Intro Religion (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 101
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 102 Christian Scriptures (3) R/CR
An exposition of the basic theology of the four Gospels coupled with an analysis of the historical and cultural milieu from which the Christian message arose and the manner in which that message was transmitted and interpreted.

REL 102H HON:Christian Scriptures (3) R/CR
Course description as stated in REL 102 (Honors Course)

REL 102S Serv Lrng:Christ Scriptures (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 102
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 103 Hebrew Scriptures (3) R
The sacred history and literature of ancient Israel as the focus of God's self-revelation. The course will unite historical study, archeology, literary analysis, and biblical theology.

REL 104 Personal Spirituality and Theology of Human Experience (3) R/CR
This course focuses on developing and articulating a personal spirituality culled from theological reflection on one's own experiences and decisions. Methods and principles from both Eastern and Western religious traditions, as well as psychology and the social sciences, serve as resources.

REL 107 Intro to Catholic Christianity (3) R/CR
This course offers students an introduction to the study of Christian theology from the Roman Catholic perspective. It begins by exploring the importance of theological reflection in contemporary culture, and then focuses on the development of present-day Church teachings drawing from both Scripture and Tradition. Topics explored include the Old Testament foundations for Christianity, the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, the profession of faith in the creeds, and the sacraments as sources of God's grace. The course also introduces students to principles of Catholic morality, and offers them an opportunity to compare Catholic teachings with those of other Christian traditions.

REL 108 World Religions (3) R/CR
The core question that people have asked from the beginning of reflective thought can be summed up in one sentence: What is the meaning or purpose of my life? In a world filled with conflict and war, in a country held bound by consumerism and fear, the answers provided by some of the major world religions can show us ways to live a vibrant life. Pre-supposing a basic Christian grounding of the majority of class participants, we will study the age-old wisdom found in Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism and Islam, with emphasis on how this knowledge can energize us to become peacemakers and healers of our global home.

REL 203 Theology of Dr. Martin Luther King (3) R
This course is a study of the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr., focusing on his contribution to Christian theology and ethics through his leadership role in the Civil Rights Movement. Students will be compelled to examine King's interpretation and appropriation of the Bible, of Gandhian ideas and methods, of Western philosophical categories, of the principles of American participatory democracy and Social Gospel concepts, considering how the black experience of oppression and the traditions of the black church influenced him.

REL 204 African-American Religious Experience (3) R
This course in the African- American Religious Experience is designed to enable students to develop an awareness as well as an appreciation of and for the historical religious values and traditions that undergird the African-American religious life in North America. Students will come to grips with the important historical, sociological and spiritual pilgrimage of African Americans from slavery into contemporary life and the suppositions of African-American religious life which help shape the social and contextual hegemony of the African-American community.

REL 206 Spirituality & Wellness (3) R/CR
Judeo-Christian spirituality is incarnational at its core. In the book of Genesis, God "walks in the garden" to encounter the first humans. Moses first meets God in a bush and his people are freed through natural plagues and physical death. The prophets see God's hand in the political-social-economic events of the day and call people to live justly through it all. Jesus Christ is born as a human being to show us that the kingdom of God is among us in the here and now. In this spirituality God enters the "natural world" to show us how to live as whole, healthy, fully conscious humans, through the exercising of freedom of choice - our "Free Will" - in accord with the Divine.

REL 212 Crisis, Faith and Human Development (3) R
This course will look at crisis in adult life as an important time in the growth of faith and self. The potential impact of crisis on individual faith and "sense of self," and the way that faith and self may shape the response to crisis, will be explored through psychological and theological resources.

REL 213 Religion & Human Development (3)
This course will help you explore the interaction between religion and personal growth throughout the life cycle. In doing this, psychological and religious/ theological resources will be used. A basic assumption made in this course is that religion and psychology are both disciplines that seek to define and describe aspects and dimensions of fundamental human experience, and, as such, when integrated, can work together in a mutually supportive fashion to enhance our understanding of what it means to be fully human.

REL 214 Feminist Womanist Theology and Spirituality (3) R
Feminist theology examines the impact of patriarchy on the spirituality of men and women. Beginning with an exploration into Christian archetypes, the course builds to a consideration of the relationship between gender and spirituality. Students will then examine historical responses to sexism within Christianity, including a growing body of literature by Womanist and Mujerista theologians.

REL 215 Life Through Death (3) R/CR
The human encounter with death and dying poses a significant challenge to persons as physical, psychological, social, and spiritual beings. This course will acquaint students with recent research on death and dying from several disciplines, at the same time it helps the student raise his/her consciousness about personal reaction and responses to this encounter. Particular emphasis will be placed on the religious/spiritual dimension of death, grief, and loss, and theological responses to that issue from within the Christian tradition. Ethical issues related to death and dying will also be examined. The student taking this course should emerge from it with an increased awareness of the diversity of issues involved in death and dying that can be applied to managing one's own life journey, as well as to caring for others.

REL 219 Starring God:Religion and Film (3) R
New Course
This course will look at the way in which religious topics, particularly portrayals of God, are depicted in 20th and 21st century film. The student will be introduced to the theology, spirituality, and culture as it is portrayed in a particular film. We will also discuss how film interpretations affect the understanding of religious themes and how these interpretations reflect or alter traditional theology. American as well as international films will be discussed in this class, as well as various religious movements active and influential during the creation of the film.

REL 221 Theology of Human Marriage and Sexuality (3) R
This course introduces students to the theology of marriage and sexuality from the Roman Catholic perspective. The first half of the course explores the biblical and historical foundations that underlie the sacrament of marriage, as well as marriage's nature, purposes, and essential properties. Topics discussed in this part of the course include the importance of matrimonial consent, "mixed" or inter-church marriage, and the distinction between annulment and divorce. The second half of the course focuses on human sexuality and explores the Catholic Church's teachings concerning the nature and purpose of sex, as well as its teachings on pre-marital sexual relations, cohabitation, birth control, and same-sex unions.

REL 228 Addiction/Spiritual Life (3) R
This course will explain how, despite the human capacity to create and to adapt, people and society can become vulnerable to attachments and thus to addictions. These pathological relationships have their source in the spiritual life. The student will study how the particular manifestations of addiction are intimate connected to systems which serve as the primary instructor on how to attain ultimate meaning and purpose in life.

REL 229 Voting for God:Rel & Politics (3) R
New Course
This course will examine the way in which religion has entered into the political arena during the late 20th and early 21st century, and the impact this has had on the global community. Topics to be discussed will be the rise of the Christian Coalition, religion in the public school classroom, religious symbols and quotes on government buildings, conflicts with the separation of church and state, and the rise of wars in the name of religion. Students will come away from this class with a deeper knowledge of political and religious issues in our world today.

REL 234 Sacred Scripture Seen Through Sacred Art (3) CR
Prerequisite(s): 100 Level Religion Recommended
From Early Christianity to the present the practice of rendering sacred themes in art and architectural decoration has been constant. This course explores monuments of architecture, sculpture, and painting inspired by sacred Scripture. Topics include an examination of images of the Life of Christ considered in the sequence of the liturgical year, Marian images, the saints and angels, and Trinitarian images. Additionally, architectural and sacred spaces will be considered. Some of the thematic issues we will consider are Christian art as a facilitator to comprehending Scripture, art as a catalyst for deepened devotion, and Church patronage of religious art and architecture through history.

REL 235 Holistic Wellness: Theory, Practice (3) R
This interactive course will introduce participants to a number of simple, effective holistic practices from different countries and cultures. Practices include Tai Chi, meditation and body movement, acupressure for alleviating pain and stress-related problems, visualization and breathing and hand massage. There will also be time for reflection and sharing. The simplicity of the work invites participants to easily share what they learn with others and is especially valuable to those working in education, health ministries, parish nursing, counseling, etc. Much of the content of the workshop is based on the work of Dr. Patricia Cane and Capacitar International, Inc.

REL 242 Exploring the Sacred (3) CR
This course seeks to explore the ways in which we may encounter the sacred in our lived experience, rather than in formal creeds or religious institutions. Students will examine the spiritual/sacred dimensions of their world by looking through a variety of different lenses, and using the tools of several different disciplines to bring those experiences into focus. Students can expect to develop a clearer understanding of the experience of the sacred, by exploring their own stories, and the stories of others as those are presented in both sacred and secular texts. The course will pay special attention to the significance that culture has in shaping and interpreting the experience of the sacred, and the variety of responses that may emerge out of this experience.

REL 245 Women in Christianity (3) R/CR
This course will consider all of the dimensions and dynamics of the spiritually-potent women who have imagined and enfleshed the mission of Jesus. Using short readings, input, and reflective dialogue we will consider ideas shaped by the religious experience of women throughout Christian history. Theological themes to be explored will include God, Trinity, Redemption, Reconciliation, Sacrament and Discipleship.

REL 245S Serv Lrng:Women in Christianity (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 245
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 302 Survey of Church History (3) R
A study of the pervasive role of the Christian Church in the shaping of European culture from the fall of the Roman Empire through the Renaissance.

REL 310 American Religious Experience (3) R
An introduction to the interplay between religion and the emergence of a distinctive American identity. This survey will focus on various interpretations and explanations which are still shaping this lively experiment.

REL 314 Spirituality of Leadership (3) R/CR
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
This course aims at the relationship between one's personal spirituality and effective leadership. Further, it considers leadership in the workplace as a personal calling. The course will explore one's innate desire for integrity of life, and will examine the common good as both the purpose of business, and as necessary for human development. The good habits of acting, known as virtues, will be considered. The application of virtue to practical situations in the workplace, and in the world at large, will allow the principles of Christian social teaching to be integrated with management theory.

REL 323 Spiritual Care of Women (3) R
New Course
This course examines the pastoral care of women, specifically, the three crucial dynamics that weave together attending practices in the healing and growth process: context, collaboration and diversity. Spiritual strategies specific to women entering ministry, intergenerational female-to-female mentoring, and complex care issues seekers present in caregiving relationships such as rape, violence, breast cancer, eating disorders, lesbianism, and gender discrimination will be discussed.

REL 335 Vatican II and American Social History (3) R
New Course
This course will focus on how average Catholics (laity, parish priests and nuns) understood the changes in their religious lives from the end of World War II until 1978 (the death of Pope Paul VI). We will look at response on the US parish level: What motivated change? How did various types of people respond to it? While the bulk of the course will focus on the Vatican II era, we will spend the last day on contemporary "legacies." Students will do taped interviews of Catholics who lived through the era, and will read materials produced during this transformative time in church history.

REL 339 Seminar in Spirituality: Critical Issues in Human Sexuality (3)
New Course
Prerequisite(s): REL 101,102 and 107 or any JCG Course
This upper-level seminar in spirituality explores complex and critical issues of human sexuality. Students will reflect theologically on topics of sexuality, and identify resources to develop a spirituality oriented towards human flourishing. Instructor's permission required for non-majors.

REL 340 Spirituality and Aging (3) S/R
Prerequisite(s): 100 Level REL
Crosslisted GST 340. A holistic approach to the enrichment and growth of elderly persons' spiritual experience will be examined from a nondenominational point of view with references to psychology and the behavioral sciences. Topics such as prayer, reconciliation and peace, interpersonal relationships, the faith of the elderly, and stages of development will be discussed.

REL 347 Seminar Systematic Theology I (3) R
This seminar-style course investigates key areas in systematic Christian theology in their historical and contemporary development, including Christology, doctrine of God, pneumatology, ecclesiology, soteriology, theological anthropology, liturgy and sacraments, and revelation, doctrine, and creed. Particular attention is given to theological hermeneutics, analysis, and reflection.

REL 348 Seminar Systematic Theology II (3) R
This seminar-style course investigates key areas in systematic Christian theology in their historical and contemporary development, including Christology, doctrine of God, pneumatology, ecclesiology, soteriology, theological anthropology, liturgy and sacraments, and revelation, doctrine, and creed. Particular attention is given to theological hermeneutics, analysis, and reflection.

REL 348S Serv Lrng:Seminar Systematic Theology II (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 348
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 350 Pauline Theo/Christ Begin (3) R/CR
Prerequisite(s): 100 level REL
This course is a study of the content and background of the letters of the Apostle Paul. Emphasis will be placed upon Paul's life, the literary and rhetorical structure of his letters, and the specific theological and pastoral themes addressed in the letters. Particular attention will be given to the social context of Paul's Christian communities, and how it impacts his message to them. We will also explore the impact of these issues in contemporary pastoral ministry contexts.

REL 350S Serv Lrng:Pauline Theo/Christ Begin (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): REL 350
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

REL 351 Spirituality of the Johannine Literature (3) R/CR
Prerequisite(s): 100 level Religion
Together we will explore the basic theology and spirituality of the Gospel of John and the Johannine Epistles, with an analysis of the milieu and culture out of which the Christian message arose and was transmitted.

REL 351H HON:Spirituality of the Johannine Literature (0) R/CR
Course description as stated in ENG 351 (Honors Course)

REL 368 Pathways to Contemplative Living (3) R
New Course
This three credit practical course is designed to expose students to contemplative practice, which is necessary component for ministerial effectiveness and personal spiritual growth, Healthy Christian maturity incorporates both active and contemplative elements within the spiritual life Dynamic ministry stems from engaged service balanced by a mindfulness that nourishes intimacy with God, with self, with others, and with creation. Designed to be both formative and informative, classes will provide instruction from selected classical spiritual sources with the intent of raising the personal awareness and development of spiritual practices of the class participants. Integration of these insights will be fostered through reflection on the formative and deformative aspects of one's formation history. The methodology for the course will include lectures, dialogue, prayer, and journaling. Written and spoken sharing on one's own salvation history will be a key aspect of the class.

REL 370 Catholicism in Rome:A Sacred Journey Through Faith & Art (3) EXP/IDS
This course offers students an on-site learning experience of the history of Catholicism in Rome from both and a faith (theological) and artistic perspective. Students will explore how the Catholic Church came into existence within the Roman Empire, and also how it developed in Rome over the next two millennia. They will also explore artistic contributions to this development - how art was commissioned and used to convey the sacred - with particular emphasis on the medieval. Renaissance, and Baroque periods. The travel portion of the course takes place over spring break.

REL 382 God the What:What our Metaphors for God Reveal About our Beliefs in God (3)
New Course
This course will examine the language we use in describing God and how that language impacts our understand of and belief about God.

REL 399 Concluding Seminar & Capstone (3) CAP
Prerequisite(s): 40 hours of Core completed
The Capstone course is an integrating component of the religious studies, the religious education, the pastoral ministry programs and the baccalaureate level learning outcomes. Students should be expected to apply pertinent ideas and questions from the liberal arts and sciences to a particular focus in religious studies. Within the timeframe of the semester, the students will prepare and publicly present a thesis paper, demonstrating the ability to identify themes (e.g. human suffering), apply strategies (e.g. social analysis; biological process), and critically examine ideologies (e.g. creationism) from the liberal arts and sciences in order to communicate in the written and spoken word about a specific question pertinent to contemporary religious studies.

RPS 268 Bringing about a Sustainable Reign of God (3)
This course explores why we are called to live more sustainably and gives practical ways to live that are more in keeping with Gospel teaching. We will look at the signs of times in which we are now living and apply Jesus' message of love and compassion towards all of God's creation. We will also look at ways in which we can spread this message to others.

RPS 301 Coming to the Well,Theology of Ministry in a Changing World (3) R
New Course
Prerequisite(s): 12 Hours of REL Course
This course will introduce pastoral care and ministry, beginning with an overview of the history of pastoral care in the Christian tradition. Students will begin focusing on the particular kinds of pastoral care and ministry that have effected their own story. Panelists will offer insights about the opportunities, challenges and graces that come with various ministerial commitments. This course will conclude with an inventory of suggestions and services that are available to support you as you move through this program, such as spiritual direction, counseling and ministry involvement.

RPS 308 Laity, Spirituality & Ministry (3)
New Course
This course examines the spiritual care of minister and ministry. How can spirituality of the laity be encouraged and nurtured in a ministerial context? What are the spiritual resources that support discernment of ministerial gifts and talents? What spiritually sustains the lay minister in the ministerial context? Students will be invited to examine the deep roots of, resources for, and influence of spirituality and ministry in contemporary spiritual care of the laity. Practical strategies for developing and sustaining a healthy spiritually will be explored, including prayer, contemplation, Biblical reflection, holistic self-assessment, and maintaining healthy relationships within the ministerial context.

RPS 309 Christian Mystical Tradition Spirit/Theo Resource Lay Ministry (3)
New Course
This course provides an overview of several Christian mystics (Bernard of Clairvaux, Francis of Assisi, Julian of Norwich, and Teresa of Avila), mining their writings for their theological insights and their contributions to spiritual formation. Class sessions will primarily consist of the discussion of texts, but individual and communal contemplative practices will also be introduced. Students will gain a greater appreciation of the Christian mystical tradition in general as well as developing spiritual practices for their ongoing personal/spiritual development and for their pastoral work.

RPS 340 Philosophy and Methods of Religious Education (3)
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
This course is an introduction to the field of Christian religious education. Along with studying the ideas and events which have shaped the teaching of Christian faith, participants will examine the wider contents - church, family, community - in which this activity takes place.

RPS 341 Ministry to Marriage & Family (3)
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
This course will explore the pastoral issues which directly apply to the preventative health or enrichment strategies for marriage and families, as well as remediation issues. It will deal with the family as a system, social analysis of the family and the developmental family life cycle.

RPS 342 Pastoral Counseling (3)
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
Short-term counseling of individuals. Basic principles of counseling involving problems typically encountered in parish life will be stressed. A study of counseling theories and methods as they apply to the various areas of pastoral ministry.

RPS 345 Pastoral Internship (3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in Theological core
Supervised pastoral education on a part-time basis during the academic year under the guidance of a professional supervisor. The course is designed to develop in the student pastoral expertise in one or several areas of concern. Possible areas of choice include: campus ministry, social action, retreat work, work with aged, religious education, chaplaining, pastoral care, youth ministry, and support group work.

RPS 346 Advanced Pastoral Internship (3)
Prerequisite(s): RPS 345
An extension of Pastoral Internship.

RPS 350 Youth Ministry (3)
An exploration of issues affecting the practice of Christian religious education and ministry with youth. This course examines the interplay between North American culture, the developmental phrase of youth and the "church systems," parish, school, family in which youth ministry happens. Youth workers are encouraged to integrate a theoretical understanding of this ministry with the practical skills for working with young people.

RPS 361 The Practice of Pastoral Care: An Intercultural Approach (3) R
New Course
Intercultural spiritual care must, first, use a phenomenological comparative approach that fully recognizes the differences between our religious worlds and the spiritual worlds of those seeking care. Second, caregivers must be able to use their theological education to use their own stories as resources in the caregiving process, and not roadblocks. Third, careseekers must be accountable for establishing an ethically sound contract of care. Fourth, careseekers must be able to draw upon psychological perspectives on loss, violence, and coping, and theological perspectives on suffering to construct and theologically grounded plan of care. Using case studies from film and our own life experiences of trauma and pastoral care, we will become familiar with this approach to intercultural spiritual care.

RPS 380 Special Topics (1-4)
To be arranged by student with a faculty member.

RPS 396 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Parallel (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

RPS 496 Cooperative Education Work Experience: Alternating (1-3) EXP
Prerequisite(s): CED 220
A work related experience supervised by a faculty coordinator in collaboration with the cooperative education staff. Credit is awarded upon successful completion of the work experience, documentation of predetermined Learning Agreement and evaluation of work performance. Evaluation of work performed is on a pass/fail basis.

SPA 101 College Spanish I (3) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 101A
A basic introduction to Spanish emphasizing confidence-building in the use of practical, spoken language. Attention is focused on pronunciation and speech patterns, the development of a working vocabulary, and the framing of simple sentences. Students are introduced to the concepts of cultural diversity and the appreciation of other cultures. Laboratory practice. No prerequisite.

SPA 101A College Spanish I (LAB) (1) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 101
Course description as stated in SPA 101

SPA 102 College Spanish Lev I (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): SPA 101
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 102A
This course builds on material covered in Spanish 101 to further develop the student's ability to speak, write and read in Spanish. Attention is focused on expanding vocabulary, increasing mastery of Spanish grammar and parts of speech, and introducing additional verb tenses. Guided practice will strengthen student's communication skills in Spanish. Students will continue to explore the diverse cultures that make up the Spanish speaking world.

SPA 102A Col Spanish I (LAB) (1) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 102
Course description as stated in SPA 102

SPA 201 College Spanish II (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): SPA 101 and 102 or their equivalent
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 201A
For students who can already control simple Spanish structures in conversation. This class will increase the student's facility in speaking, improve aural comprehension and expand vocabulary. Stress is placed on diversity in communicative styles within the Spanish-speaking world. Cultural and literary readings. Laboratory practice.

SPA 201A College Spanish II (LAB) (1) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 201
Course description as stated in SPA 201

SPA 202 Col Spanish Lev II (3) LAS
Prerequisite(s): SPA 101, 102, 201 or their equivalent.
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 202A
For students who can already control simple Spanish structures in conversation. This class will increase the student's facility in speaking, improve aural comprehension and expand vocabulary. Stress is placed on diversity in communicative styles within the Spanish-speaking world. Cultural and literary readings. Laboratory practice.

SPA 202A College Spanish II (LAB) (1) LAS
Concurrent requisite(s): SPA 202
Course description as stated in SPA 202

SPA 220 Spanish Written Communication (3) LAS
New Course
Students will practice intermediate-level Spanish writing skills for use in personal and professional communication requirements; prior ability in Spanish needed.

SPA 230 Spanish Conversation and Culture (3) LAS
New Course
Students will practice intermediate-level Spanish conversational skills and strategies within culturally appropriate context for personal and professional use; prior ability in Spanish needed.

SPA 320 Literature in Spanish (3) LAS
New Course
Students will examine authentic Spanish language texts for their cultural, linguistic and intellectual content; prior ability in Spanish needed.

SPA 330 Spanish for the Professions (3) LAS
New Course
Students will be introduced to and practice specialized Spanish vocabulary and idioms for use in their specific professional and career situations; prior ability in Spanish needed.

SPA 358 Hispanic Literature in English (3) L/CL
Prerequisite(s): SPA 101/Equivalent, COM/ENG 101 and COM 100
Crosslisted ENG 358. Students will examine a selection of modern Latin-American authors translated into English for their literary, cultural, and linguistic content. Minimum competency in Spanish needed.