All Course Descriptions

Graduate 2020-2021
ACC   ART   ATR   AYA   BIO   BUS   CIS   ECE   ECO   EDU   FIN   LGS   MCE   MGT   MKT   MOL   MUS   NUR   PAS   PHI   PSY   PT   RDG   REL   RPS   SED   SOC  

ACC 600 Managerial Accounting (3)
Prerequisite(s): ACC 213
This course focuses on the use of accounting concepts, systems, and tools in managing contemporary organizations. Emphasis is on the role of accounting in managerial and organizational planning, control, and decision-making. Students will develop an in-depth knowledge of accounting systems, understand the importance of ethical standards in accounting activities, and apply accounting concepts in "real world" cases.

ART 510 Art History:Special Topics (3)
Courses offered on an occasional basis to explore subject matter of special interest or timely relevance. Topics may include "Matisse & Picasso: Dialogue & Rivalry of Great Modern Masters," "History of Photography," etc.

ART 510A Topics in Art History: History of Design (3)
New Course
A survey of visual communication/design/ and industrial design from unrecorded times through the present. Emphasis will be from the industrial revolution through the present.

ART 520 Painting Workshop (3)

ART 525 Ceramics Workshop (3-6)
Enhancement of technical development of throwing on the wheel, decorative skills and glazing formulae.

ART 536 Sculpture Workshop:Sustainable Mixed Media (3)
This course blends sculptural methods and current technologies with traditions of the past. Participants will explore sustainable processes and materials. Beyond the making of art, emphasis will be placed on the conceptual; consideration of the effect of creation of this work on the planet's resources. ART 336/536 will meet together.

ART 555 Drawing Workshop:Figure Drawing (3-6)
An exploration of the creative possibilities and techniques of drawing in pastel. Students will investigate the strategies for producing vibrant images using this expressive medium. The principles of landscape design, perspective and color theory will complement the experience of direct observation in unique natural settings.

ART 671 Advanced Studio Problems (3)
Prerequisite(s): Instructor approval, learning contract, and intermediate level of accomplishment in area of concentration
Comprehensive problem solving experiences in studio arts under the supervision of a graduate faculty member. This tutorial culminates in an exhibition of a cohesive body of work.

ATR 511 Assessment and Management I: Prevention and Acute Care (4)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Masters in Athletic Training Program
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 511A
This course will introduce students to the profession of athletic training and techniques of preventative and acute care. Emphasis will be on the standards of professional practice, professional ethics, and emergency management skills (e.g. spine boarding, emergency response with airway management, and oxygen administration). Upon successful course completion the student will receive Emergency Cardiac Care certification, First Aid- Responding to Emergencies, Basic Life Support, and Blood-Borne Pathogens training. Course content will also include injury prevention and risk management, evaluation skills, with emphasis on history intake, the physical exam, and interprofessional relationships with other health care professionals.

ATR 511A Assessment and Management I: Prevention and Acute Care (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 511
Course description as stated on ATR 511

ATR 512 Assessment and Management II: Musculoskeletal Medicine (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 511, ATR 541, BIO 526
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 512A
This course will introduces assessment and management of commonly encountered musculoskeletal injuries and illnesses. Emphasis will be on the head and face, spine, upper extremity, and lower extremity. Course content will include reviewing injury evaluation skills, with emphasis on postural screening, range of motion, strength, and functional evaluations, patient-related outcomes and the interpretation of diagnostic tests. Surgical and non-surgical approaches to patient management will be discussed. Proper documentation of clinical findings will also be addressed and practiced.

ATR 512A Assessment and Management II: Musculoskeletal Medicine (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 512
Course description as stated on ATR 512.

ATR 521 Therapeutic Intervention I: Physical Agents and Exercise (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 511, ATR 541, BIO 526
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 521A
This course is a survey of manual, mechanical, acoustic, and electromagnetic therapeutic agents utilized by athletic trainers and other allied health professionals in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and other disorders. Students will demonstrate understanding of the theoretical principles underlying the use of therapeutic agents and exercise in the care of physically active patients. Using the physiological responses to trauma, illness, and healing, students will learn therapeutic modalities and rehabilitation techniques used to restore normal function.

ATR 521A Therapeutic Intervention I: Physical Agents and Exercise (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 521
Course description as stated on ATR 512.

ATR 522 Therapeutic Intervention II: Athletic Performance and Conditioning (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 521 and ATR 521A
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 522A
This course will address the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively assess, plan, and implement conditioning and performance enhancement strategies for athletes and physically active individuals. Course content will also include performance nutrition, ergogenic aids, and supplementation. At the conclusion of the course, students should be prepared for the National Strength and Condition Association (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) examination.

ATR 522A Therapeutic Intervention II: Athletic Performance and Conditioning (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 522
Course description as stated on ATR 522

ATR 530 Research Methods in Health Sciences (3)
Prerequisite(s): One semester or two quarters of Statistics (3 semester hours).
This course focuses on the interaction of the components of the research process with application to the theory and practice of healthcare. This course emphasizes the critical appraisal and utilization of health-related research including selected theories, methodological approaches, team-based research, and ethical considerations in the use of human subjects. Students will understand the critical nature of the research team, peer-review, and dissemination of results to evidence based practice.

ATR 541 Prevention and Acute Care Clinical I (1)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Masters in Athletic Training Program
This course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of prevention, assessment, and management of injury and illnesses in pediatric and adult patient populations. Students complete a clinical rotation under the supervision of a preceptor in a healthcare setting with a focus on prevention and emergency management in intercollegiate or interscholastic athletics.

ATR 542 Pediatric and Adult Populations Clinical I (2)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 511, ATR 541, BIO 526
This course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of prevention, assessment, and management of injury and illnesses in pediatric and adult patient populations. This course requires 150 hours of clinical education under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer and other healthcare professionals in event medicine, health promotion, intercollegiate and/or interscholastic athletics.

ATR 543 Pediatric and Adult Populations Clinical II (2)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 542
A continuation of ATR 542, this course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of prevention, assessment, and management of injury and illnesses in pediatric and adult patient populations. This course requires 150 hours of clinical education under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer and other healthcare professionals in event medicine, health promotion, intercollegiate and/or interscholastic athletics.

ATR 551 Healthcare Policy and Administration (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MAT program
The purpose of this course is for the student to gain a historical, political, economic, social, and financial perspective on the health care system in the United States. Delivery of health care, health care policies, financing of health care, and health care reform will be discussed with an emphasis on changes affecting the health care system. Areas of exploration include: cost containment, managed care, employment practices, social justice issues, legislative and regulatory controls, globalization and ethical/legal issues.

ATR 613 Assessment and Management III: Medical Conditions and Mental Health (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 522, ATR 522A
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 613A
This course addresses the knowledge and skills necessary to assess and manage medical conditions and mental health disorders specific to the field of athletic training. Students will learn to use diagnostic, pharmacological, and holistic interventions. Emphasis will include the practical, legal and ethical implications of drug administration by the athletic trainer.

ATR 613A Assessment and Management III: Medical Conditions and Mental Health (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): ATR 613
Course description as stated on ATR 613

ATR 623 Therapeutic Interventions III: Biomechanical Analysis and Ergonomics (2)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 521, ATR 522
This course is a continuation of ATR 521 and ATR 522 with a focus on integrating knowledge in the areas of human anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, and musculoskeletal injuries. Work posture analyses, cumulative trauma disorders (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome), and ergonomic surveys are presented and practiced. Emphasis is placed on ergonomic methods and techniques used to assess the design of modern work environments. Students will learn biomechanical, psychophysical and work physiology methods in preventing and rehabilitating musculoskeletal injuries.

ATR 631 EBP Project Development (1)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 530
This course integrates patient values, clinical expertise, and scholarly research to develop competence in evidence based practice. By the end of this course students will be able to create a research project which includes: formulation of a relevant PICO question, appraisal of the available literature, selection and design of patient oriented outcome measures for clinical practice.

ATR 632 EBP Project Implementation (1)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 631
A continuation of ATR 631, this course focuses on conducting evidence based research and implementing findings into every day practice. At the conclusion of this course students will disseminate the results of a patient oriented outcome research project to practicing clinicians in both written and oral formats.

ATR 644 Primary Care and Rehabilitation Clinical I (1)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 543
This course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of prevention, assessment, and management of injury and illnesses in the general pediatric and adult populations. Students complete clinical rotations under the supervision of a preceptor in a healthcare setting with a focus on primary care and rehabilitation.

ATR 645 Primary Care and Rehabilitation Clinical II (1)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 543
A continuation of ATR 644, this course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of prevention, assessment, and management of injury and illnesses in the general pediatric and adult populations. Students complete clinical rotations under the supervision of a preceptor in a healthcare setting with a focus on primary care and rehabilitation.

ATR 646 Prevention and Acute Care Clinical II (1)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 543
A continuation of ATR 541, this course focuses on laboratory and clinical experiences designed to integrate advancing knowledge and psychomotor skills of prevention, assessment, and management of acute injury and illnesses in pediatric and adult patient populations. Students complete a clinical rotation under the supervision of a preceptor in a healthcare setting with a focus on prevention and emergency management in athletic and non-athletic environments

ATR 647 Internship I (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 646
This course is designed to be an immersive (37 hours+ per week) clinical experience for graduate athletic training students in their final year. This course focuses on the athletic training studentís transition into practice, gain independence in a setting of interest, and develop professional networking opportunities. Students will be evaluated on clinical and professional performance by an internship supervisor as well as on a portfolio of the studentís academic and professional development. This course requires a full time clinical experience under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer.

ATR 648 Internship II (4)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 647
A continuation of ATR 647, this course is designed to be an immersive (37 hours+ per week) clinical experience for graduate athletic training students in their final year. This course focuses on the athletic training studentís transition into practice, gaining independence in a setting of interest, and developing professional networking opportunities. Students will be evaluated on clinical and professional performance by an internship supervisor as well as on a portfolio of the studentís academic and professional development. This course requires a full time clinical experience under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer.

ATR 653 Professional Issues in Athletic Training (2)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Athletic Training Education Program
This course addresses professional socialization and management in athletic training. Topics will include intra- & inter-professional communication, inter-professional education, personnel management, conflict resolution, and providing appropriate feedback to subordinates. Administrative issues regarding budgeting, inventory management, facility design, administration, legalities & work place readiness for multiple settings will be addressed.

ATR 661 Advanced Practice in Athletic Training (2)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 646
This course is an in-depth study of contemporary issues and concerns for the athletic trainer. Topics will include pediatric pathologies, neuroscience/concussion, advanced manual therapy, diagnostic imaging, casting, suturing, and durable medical equipment.

ATR 662 Athletic Training Capstone (3)
Prerequisite(s): ATR 661
This course focuses on complex medical problems and integration of mastery-level competence as an athletic trainer in healthcare facilities. Students are evaluated on their clinical proficiency in assessment, management, rehabilitation, and treatment of orthopedic and medical conditions common to the field of athletic training. The ability to administer and manage a healthcare facility is assessed. Preparation for the BOC examination is included.

AYA 533 Adol/Young Adult Practicum (2-3)
Prerequisite(s): AYA 550, AYA 670 and Admission to Graduate Program
The 120 hour field experience is the central component of this three credit hour course. The student will be assigned to a specific school in grades 7-12 where he/she will participate in flexible field hours Monday through Friday, with seminars back on campus. Teaching activities as designated by the instructor and/or content area methods specialist will be assigned in order to apply theory learned in prior course work. Students will teach a minimum of six lessons in the classroom, with scheduled mentor teacher and Mount supervisor evaluations. The overall goal of the course is to prepare students for student teaching.

AYA 550 Nature and Needs of Adolescents (3)
In this course, students will examine the unique nature and needs of young adolescents in relation to effective secondary teaching practices. Major trends and issues facing secondary classroom teachers will be investigated through evaluation of current educational research. Such trends include human development, classroom management, school organization, funding, curriculum, and assessment. Specific secondary instructional strategies will be discussed and applied through peer teaching. Reflection of personal beliefs, educational theory, and practice is promoted in the course.

AYA 670 AYA Curriculum Methods: Teaching to Standards (3)
The purpose of this course is to integrate theories of teaching and learning with actual practices of standards-based education. The focus of the course is on the improvement of teaching and learning by putting standards at the forefront of the instructional program. The graduate student will analyze Ohio's Learning Standards and National Standards (NCTM, NSTA, NCTE, NCSS, NAEA, etc.). Interpretation of the standards in order to develop approaches to teaching while maintaining grade level rigor in lieu of adapting instruction to the average or low achiever will also be addressed. The course will also include approaches to standards-based assessment, especially through the use of technology and web-based learning activities.

BIO 515 Human Anatomy for Physician Assistants with LAB (5)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the PA Program
Corequisite(s): BIO 520, BIO 525, PAS 500, PAS 505 and PAS 510
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 515A, BIO 515R
This course will serve as a comprehensive, foundational review of human anatomy in a lecture with enhanced laboratory exposure format. The emphasis will be on the relationship between anatomy and physiologic function as it will apply to physical assessment.

BIO 515A Human Anatomy for Physician Assistants (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 515, BIO 515R
This course is the lab component for BIO 515

BIO 515R Human Anatomy for Physician Assistants (Recitation) (0)
This course is the lab component for BIO 515

BIO 520 Genetics and Disease Screening (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the PA Program
Corequisite(s): BIO 515/515A, BIO 525, PAS 500, PAS 505, PAS 510
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 520R
This course covers current understanding of and modern approaches to human genetic diseases. The goal is to equip students to understand the role of genetics in the practice of medicine. This will involve the ability to analyze the medical genetics literature as well as the clinical applications of genetic knowledge in the care of individual patients.

BIO 520R Genetics and Disease Screening (Recitation) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 520
This course is the lab component for BIO 520

BIO 525 Medical Physiology for Physician Assistants (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the PA Program
Corequisite(s): BIO 515/515A, BIO 520, PAS 500, PAS 505 and PAS 510
This basic science course is a comprehensive, review of medical physiology and pathophysiology with clinical applications. It introduces the PA student to the function of the human body and its organ systems. It is organized to coincide with BIO 515 Human Anatomy to develop the PA student's foundational understanding of the human body.

BIO 525R Medical Physiology for Physician Assistants (Recitation) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): BIO 525
This course is the lab component for BIO 525

BIO 526 Human Gross Anatomy with LAB (8)
This course provides a complete study of the anatomy of the human body. This course is primarily designed for the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, and therefore, places emphasis on integrating basic knowledge gained in prerequisite coursework with an in-depth knowledge of the relationships of the skeletal, muscular, peripheral vascular and nervous systems.

BIO 526A Human Gross Anatomy (LAB) (0)
Corequisite(s): BIO 526
Course description as stated on BIO 526

BUS 600 Finance and Accounting for Leaders (3)
This course will prepare non-financial leaders to understand the financial implications behind organizational decisions. This will involve the presentation and interpretation of accounting information from the perspective of the user. This course will study basic financial statements as well as examine the cost components for manufacturing and non-manufacturing companies and their relevance in decision-making. This course will offer an overview on net present value and its importance in organizational decisions.

BUS 605 Internship (1-3)
Internships provide the student with the opportunity to gain work experience relating to a student's major. The internship is planned, coordinated, and supervised by employer and a business division faculty member. Successful completion of the work experience and evaluation of work performance is required. Students may earn 1 to 3 credits.

CIS 610 Understanding Technology (3)
This is an introductory technology course on understanding and using information technology. It focuses on communications using computer technology, the digital revolution, the Internet, and the Web. It covers the fundamental computing concepts surrounding the digital age including software, hardware, data, people, communications, and procedures. It also examines ethical issues in the information age and investigates emerging technologies that could impact individuals as well as organizations in the future. This course is required for all students who do not have a technology-related degree and is a prerequisite to MGT 620.

ECE 530 Integrating Science and Social Studies through Content Reading (3)
This course provides the preservice educator with the strategies and methods to promote learning experiences in which young children develop key concepts and knowledge in social studies and science through content reading. Content of the disciplines is addressed through critical reading of both literary and informational text. Meaningful activities to develop and enhance reading comprehension, as related to each discipline, will support the reading experiences by addressing and strategizing ways to help young students (prekindergarten - 5th grade) solve concrete, real life problems in developmentally and culturally appropriate ways. The course will emphasize and enhance the instruction of thinking skills related to inquiry, reasoning, context, and problem solving.

ECE 533 Early Childhood Literacy Practicum (1)
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into Graduate Education Program
One of two Early Childhood Practica of 50 hours each. This practicum entails supervised teaching in an ECE setting to facilitate the college student's ability to instruct young students in the skills and processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing for the promotion of literacy.

ECE 534 Early Childhood Integrating Curriculum Practicum (1)
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into Graduate Education Program
Concurrent requisite(s): ECE 530
One of two Early Childhood Practica of 50 hours each. This practicum entails supervised teaching in an ECE setting to promote teaching skills related to Integrating the Curriculum.

ECE 552 Math Curriculum and Methods (3)
This graduate course is designed to prepare a teacher candidate with the background necessary to integrate theory and practice of mathematics pedagogy within the context of student environment. Major mathematical concepts for grades Pre-K - 8 will be interlaced throughout the term to provide students with the necessary background for this endeavor. Methods and standards endorsed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) for teaching mathematics will be taught and modeled.

ECE 630 Promote Young Child Development (3)
Specialized study of the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, moral/ethical, and aesthetic development of typical and atypical children throughout the P-12 continuum and the impacts of trauma. The course will emphasize mental health and social emotional development to provide learning environments and experiences which support and enhance the development of all P-12 learners.

ECO 600 Global Economic Issues (3)
Prerequisite(s): ECO 211 or ECO 212
Global Economic issues is an international macroeconomics course that focuses on the interactions among credit markets, goods and services markets, and foreign exchange markets. This global framework is used to explain changes in a nation's economic health, its economic impacts on foreign countries, and the effects of government and central bank policies.

ECO 655 Global Economic Awareness (3)
This course has two distinct parts. The first part is a comparison of the different economic systems around the globe. In this section, students examine the economic structures of different nations as well as the different roles for government. The second part of the course focuses on international trade. Students examine the theories that guide trade and the role of international economic institutions such as the World Trade Organization.

EDU 500 Statistics and Research (3)
This course explores the components of the research process: problem definition, hypothesis construction, variables, literature review, research designs, statistical methods, collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data.

EDU 501 Educational Psychology (3)
A study of the teaching/learning process, what learning is and how it occurs according to three major classifications of theories and the correlates of learning - theories of intelligence, cognitive styles, thinking processes, thinking skills, motivation and creativity. Emphasis will be placed on applications to the teaching craft, including classroom dynamics and management, teaching/learning styles, including individual differences of students, the teacher and the classroom environment and measurements.

EDU 502 Measurement & Evaluation (3)
Materials and techniques used to assess and evaluate students. Administration and interpretation of standardized instruments. Construction of various types of teacher-made tests and pupil evaluation. Methods of classroom test construction.

EDU 504 Proactive Classroom Leadership (3)
Evidenced based principles and practices in relationship-based classroom leadership. Basic concepts of proactively managing a classroom through addressing social emotional needs. Models and strategies that influence and can be used for increasing student engagement and learning.

EDU 517 Technology in the Instructional Process (3)
This is an introductory course on the use of technology in K-12 classrooms. Using a combination of lecture and hands-on instruction, it will address issues surrounding the use of instructional technology, including, but not limited to: instructional software; the Internet; PowerPoint and other presentations program; hypermedia; SmartBoards; and technology in the instructional process. One main emphasis of the course will be the development of technology-based projects to be used in the classroom. The course will also address assistive technology and the ethical and responsible use of technology in the classroom. The theoretical underpinnings of instructional technology will also be covered.

EDU 533A Art Education Practicum (1-3)
Prerequisite(s): Web Approval of Instructor
The field experience is the central component of this course which ranges from 1-3 credits, depending upon the needs and experience of the learner as determined by the student's advisor. The student will be assigned to two or three placements with students in grades K-12. The student will participate in the various placements practicing skills and completing application assignments from associated major courses. The instructor will supervise the students in placement at least two times and meet with the students on a regular basis. Each credit requires at least 50 hours of fieldwork.

EDU 533M Music Education Practicum (2-3)
Prerequisite(s): Web Approval of Instructor
The field experience is the central component of this course which ranges from 1-3 credits, depending upon the needs and experience of the learner as determined by the student's advisor. The student will be assigned to two or three placements with students in grades K-12. The student will participate in the various placements practicing skills and completing application assignments from associated major courses. The instructor will supervise the students in placement at least two times and meet with the students on a regular basis. Each credit requires at least 50 hours of fieldwork.

EDU 553 Methods of Teaching Mathematics (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School
An exploration of methods used in teaching mathematics at the middle level and secondary level. Students will plan instruction for a wide range of learner abilities, backgrounds and goals based on learnersí prior knowledge and conceptualizations. Also, students will learn how to assess student progress according to Ohioís Learning Standards in Mathematics. Students will use appropriate electronic technologies in lesson design and delivery which have application in the mathematics classroom.

EDU 556 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School
This course is designed to introduce the teacher candidate to the principles, practices, and guidelines necessary to teach language arts to a diverse population of middle level students and secondary level students. The teacher candidate will prepare language arts lessons that ensure success for all learners enabling them to construct a meaningful understanding of language arts concepts. Lessons and language arts curricula projects will be aligned to the ODE content standards and to the learning outcomes for Ohio's State tests in English Language Arts. Integration in other content areas will be explored and encouraged.

EDU 558 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School
This course is designed to prepare the teacher candidate to teach social studies and the social sciences to children in the middle and secondary grades. Students will become familiar with the curriculum framework as well as the philosophies behind various teaching approaches as outlined by the NCSS Standards and Ohio's Learning Standards in Social Studies. The teacher candidate will investigate and practice using various teaching techniques and materials.

EDU 559 Methods of Teaching Sciences (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School
An exploration of methods used in teaching biology/science, chemistry/physical sciences, and earth/space/environmental sciences. Students will plan instruction for a wide range of learner abilities, backgrounds and goals based on learners' prior knowledge and conceptualizations. Instruction is aligned to the NGSS, NSTA, and Ohio's Learning Standards. Laboratory and field based experiences require use of current resources in the field. Students will use appropriate electronic technologies which have application in the learning environment. Safety issues and the ethical use of living materials are emphasized.

EDU 600 Integrative Project (1)
Prerequisite(s): EDU 500
The development of the Integrative Project is the culmination of the School of Education's Master of Arts Degree programs. Students apply content learned in the EDU 500 Statistics and Research course and integrate content from courses throughout their Graduate Program. Students critically analyze peer-reviewed literature surrounding a selected educational issue and propose a feasible solution based upon current research. EDU 600 is a repeatable course.

EDU 602 Ethics for Educators (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graduate Education Program or Permission of Dean
This course is a story of major ethical theories and their application to educational issues. Ethical case studies will be examined. Reflection on personal beliefs concerning correct behavior and the development of a professional code of ethics are important components of this graduate course.

EDU 604 Integrative Research Project (3)
Prerequisite(s): EDU 500
The development of the Integrated Research Project is the culmination of The School of Education's Master of Arts Degree programs. Students apply content learned in the EDU 500 Statistics and Research course and integrate content from courses throughout each Graduate Program. Students critically analyze peer-reviewed literature surrounding a selected educational issue and propose a feasible solution based upon current research.

EDU 616 Cognition Across Cultures (3)
This course will provide the graduate student with a broader view of learning in terms of the influence of language on the child's world view and the ability to process concepts, ideas and problems. Also covered are the impact of culture on the child's understanding of story, a respect, understanding and valuing of different cultural beliefs and practices, needs for functioning in two worlds, and the focus and importance of various disciplines in other cultures.

EDU 631 Promoting Student Development P-12 and The Effects of Trauma (3)
Specialized study of the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, moral/ethical, and aesthetic development of typical and atypical children throughout the P-12 continuum and the impacts of trauma. The course will emphasize mental health and social emotional development to provide learning environments and experiences which support and enhance the development of all P-12 learners.

EDU 644 Graduate Student Teaching (6)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to student teaching and completion of practicum hours
An intensive full-day experience in teaching and related professional development. Student teaching allows the student to synthesize the theory and practice under the guidance of an experienced master teacher. This is an all day experience in the relevant grade levels, lasting a minimum of twelve weeks.

EDU 671 Curriculum Development: Theory and Applications (3)
This course presents a critical examination of foundations, principles, concepts, and current practice in the field of curriculum. Topics will include program planning, design, implementation, and evaluation; using a curriculum mapping model for instructional improvement; and using collaborative and interdisciplinary approaches to curriculum development within this framework.

EDU 672 School Law (3)
A review of laws, court decisions, and issues pertinent to teachers, administrators, and students, such as classroom discipline, teacher negligence, and students' rights. The legal process, structures of the law, legislation/litigation, and practices to avoid legal infringements are addressed.

EDU 673 Communications & Problem Solving (3)
Educational leaders are responsible for positive, productive communications and problem solving in schools, including interpersonal communications, conflict resolution, problem identification, solution development and the use of data in seeking continuous school improvement. The issues, skills and knowledge related to communicating successfully with all stakeholders in the school organization will be the focus of this course. Through readings, classroom activities, hands-on-practice, and written reflection, participants will explore the behaviors, beliefs, and practices required to meet the challenges and responsibilities for effective communications, conflict resolution and problem solving in schools.

EDU 674 Instructional Leadership and Data-Informed Decisions (3)
Students examine leadership roles as forces which define the quality of educational institutions. Leadership theories, classic and contemporary models are studied. Themes such as organizational climate, systems thinking, collaboration and change management are discussed in depth. Knowledge, skills and attitudes essential to effective school leadership are studied. Reactions to school reform are discussed in-depth. Teachers' and principals' reactions to change, and the gaps in their perceptions will be analyzed. Strategies for using data to inform decision making on school reform and improvement efforts will be examined.

EDU 675 School Finance (3)
This course is a graduate study of financing public education systems in the United States, focusing on federal, state and local financing of schools; equalization of educational opportunity; sources of school revenue; school budgets; and the business practices employed in the daily operations of a school district. An important element of this course is the integration of finances with the issues of priority setting, educational goals, curriculum and general administrative practice at the school site level. Emphasis will be placed on principles and practices relating to Ohio public school finance.

EDU 676 Educational Administration (3)
This course is a practical introduction to the theories and every day practices of educational leadership. The course is designed to provide an examination of organizational behavior as well as introduce you to the challenges that will face you as an educational leader. Students will be introduced to models of supervision that will have an effect on student achievement through the practice of observation and evaluation, improve instruction, and aid in the development curriculum.

EDU 677 Principal Internship (3)
Prerequisite(s): EDU 674, EDU 676
This experience is to provide the participant with an opportunity to relate the course work and research to actual practice while engaged in specific dimensions of leadership in the school. Work will be done under the supervision of the building administrator as well as Mount St. Joseph University faculty. (This course is to be taken two semesters at 3 credits each for a total of 6 credits).

EDU 680 Leadership & Management of Special Education Programs (3)
This course provides the participants with the background in special education law necessary for effective leadership and management of special education programs. The major focus of the course is on the foundation of special education law in legislation and case law. Topics include the reauthorization of IDEA, NCLB, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act and other legislation and regulations. Working with families will be covered along with IEP's, assessment, minority representation, tiered model of interventions, and administrative issues.

EDU 699 Professional Development Workshop (1-4)
Independent study under the guidance of a School of Education faculty member to meet stated objectives. This course is designed to enrich the learning of Education graduate students and practicing teachers. Students develop a proposal with desired goals for the experience. Written permission of Graduate Chairperson and the School of Education faculty member required.

EDU 710 Developing a Deeper Understanding of Leadership (3)
This course is a study of leadership and systems change. Students will explore what leadership is, characteristics of effective leaders, and reflect upon their own skills, knowledge, and disposition as leaders. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how to lead systems change to create inclusive educational environments for all students. The course is designed to allow students, using various media, to examine skills required to be critical consumers of educational research, to understand theories of leadership and systems change, to review universal design of instructional supports, and learn about practices validated by research to be responsive to all students, and in particular culturally diverse students.

EDU 720 Data Driven Decision Making and Evidence Based Practices (3)
Prerequisite(s): EDU 710
This course is a study of data-driven decision making and evidence-based practices. Students will explore varied sources of data and how to interpret data for educational decision making. Emphasis will also be placed on reading research and exploring evidence-based practices to ensure educational equity. The course is designed to allow students, using various media, to examine skills required to be critical consumers of data and educational research, and learn about practices validated by research to be responsive to all students, and in particular culturally diverse students.

EDU 730 Communication, Collaboration, and Coaching (3)
Prerequisite(s): EDU 710, EDU 720
This course is a study of 3 Cs of leadership: communication, collaboration, and coaching. Effective leadership and systems change is not possible without the skill and strategy to effectively communicate vision and needs, work interactively with others and facilitate change via coaching. Students will learn about and explore their own skill development in each of these areas. The course is designed to allow students, using various media, to examine skills required to be effective communicators and collaborators including intentional listening and communication techniques. Students will also explore coaching models and research on effective feedback. Emphasis will be placed on coaching of strategies fostering educational equity.

FIN 610 Managerial Finance (3)
Prerequisite(s): FIN 300
This course builds on fundamental corporate finance concepts to examine in-depth financial theory and practices essential to financial decision-making in organizations. Students will develop analytical skills and problem set evaluation methods to assess financial resources and recommend financial actions to address managerial issues. Topics include valuation (securities, projects, corporate), financing decisions (strategic and tactical), and ethical issues in financial decisions in organizations.

LGS 625 Legal Issues in Organizations (3)
This course includes a review of various legal issues found in organizations, including employer liability, employment contracts, discrimination, hiring practices, labor relations, and regulation by administrative agencies.

MCE 533 School Practicum: Education Content (2)
Concurrent requisite(s): EDU 556 or EDU 558 or EDU 559 or EDU 553
A field based experience that is designed to give the student the opportunity to work in the classroom with students in grades 4-9. The student will be placed with a practicing teacher in the preservice teacher's area(s) of concentration(s) for an extended field experience. The preservice teacher will be expected to not only observe, but to also plan for and teach one-on-one, small group, and whole class lessons as directed and supervised by the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor. Placements will be coordinated through the School of Education. Each credit hour is equivalent to 50 classroom hours. This field experience is a prerequisite for student teaching and as such students are not expected to assume total responsibility for the classroom.

MCE 533A MCE Content Practicum (1-2)
A field based experience that is designed to give the student the opportunity to work in the classroom with students in grades 4-9. The student will be placed with a practicing teacher in the preservice teacher's area(s) of concentration(s) for an extended field experience. The preservice teacher will be expected to not only observe, but to also plan for and teach one-on-one, small group, and whole class lessons as directed and supervised by the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor. Placements will be coordinated through the School of Education. Each credit hour is equivalent to 50 classroom hours. This field experience is a prerequisite for student teaching and as such students are not expected to assume total responsibility for the classroom.

MCE 540 Introduction to Middle Childhood Education (3)
In this course, students will examine the unique nature and needs of middle childhood students (grades 4-9) in relation to effective middle childhood teaching practices. Major trends and issues facing MCE classroom teachers will be investigated through evaluation of current educational research. Such trends include human development, lesson plan development, classroom management, school organization, funding, curriculum and assessment. Specific MCE instructional strategies will be discussed and applied through peer teaching. Reflection of personal beliefs, educational theory, and practice is promoted in the course.

MGT 500 Corporate, Legal and Ethical Responsibility (3)
This course includes an introduction to our legal and governmental regulatory system, as well as a review of constitutional considerations for businesses. Morality, Ethics and Legal rules are defined and distinguished to give the student a foundation upon which to analyze the multiple dimensions of common business problems. The relationship between the Law and Social Responsibility is examined. Specific business topics and their legal and ethical aspects are addressed. This includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the following areas: consumer relationships; business organizations; the balancing of corporate vs. individual power (employee rights and responsibilities, employment discrimination); and the emerging ethics in a global economy.

MGT 510 Managing Innovation and Technology (3)
Develops foundational understanding of the role of innovation and technology in business organizations from inception through execution. Includes frameworks for understanding creation, commercialization, and value from new products and services. Topics include internal and external processes for innovation, impact of new technology on organizational metrics, the role of technology in profit generation.

MGT 580 Group Dynamics & Team Building (3)
A theoretical and applied study of interpersonal group processes and structures in organizations and intergroup processes. Students master fundamentals of group dynamics, intergroup dynamics, and team development and then analyze and apply these understandings to group and team issues in the workplace. Students should improve their effectiveness in groups and teams. Topics include the leader's role in initiating, building and maintaining groups and teams, the management of conflict between and within groups, high performance teams, virtual teams, and decision making and problem-solving processes.

MGT 602 Leadership in Organizations (3)
Explores how to lead, follow, and understand behavior in organizations. Examines models and theories of leadership and organizational behavior with emphasis on practical implications. Students will analyze, diagnose, and make recommendations about workplace issues. In so doing students will develop an understanding of how managers can improve organizational performance and enhance their abilities to be ethical, effective leaders.

MGT 603 Project and Operations Management (3)
Prerequisite(s): MTH 174 or MTH 176
Focuses on the basic concepts, issues, and techniques for efficient and effective operations. Special emphasis is placed on process improvement and project management. Topics include operations strategy, inventory management, process design and analysis, quality management, project management, and supply chain management.

MGT 605 Leadership Seminar I (3)
The leadership seminar provides a semester-long examination of a single cutting-edge management topic. Potential topics may include but not be limited to finance and international negotiations, international business, global commerce, entrepreneurship and supply chain management.

MGT 606 Leadership Seminar II (3)
The leadership seminar provides a semester-long examination of a single cutting-edge management topic. Potential topics may include but not be limited to finance and international negotiations, international business, global commerce, entrepreneurship and supply chain management.

MGT 607 Strategic Management (3)
Strategic management focuses on fundamentals of business strategy Topics include development of strategy, strategic frameworks and methods, industry analyses, and competitor analyses. A major focus is methods of dealing with changes in the industry and general environment. A strategic analysis of a business or organization is the culminating experience of this course.

MGT 610 People in Organizations (3)
This course explores individual, group and organizational processes to increase understanding of self and others in organizations. Emphasizes awareness, self-development, and self-management in the context of organizational issues such as conflict resolution, negotiations, team performance, and leadership opportunities.

MGT 620 Managing Information, Technology and Projects (3)
This course addresses significant concepts and issues related to managing information, technology, and projects from both strategic and tactical perspectives. Emphasis is given to addressing challenges associated with the evaluation, section, implementation, and management of information and technology related systems that serve to increase an organization's efficiency and competitive advantage. This course has a significant emphasis on effective project management practices.

MGT 625 Leadership & Organizational Behavior (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 580
Explores how to lead, follow, and understand behavior in organizations. Examines models and theories of leadership and organizational behavior with emphasis on practical implications. Students will analyze, diagnose, and make recommendations about workplace issues. In so doing, students will develop an understanding of how managers can improve organizational performance and enhance their abilities to be ethical, effective leaders.

MGT 635 Negotiations (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 580
A theoretical and practical study of negotiations to enhance understanding of negotiation processes and skills. Examines methods such as bargaining, mediation, arbitration, and distributive and integrative negotiations. Students develop analytical frameworks for negotiations and apply negotiation skills in simulations and through role-play.

MGT 640 The Changing Workplace (3)
This course will focus on the dynamic nature of organizations and change. Since the organizational environment changes continuously, the course is by nature a topics course. Additionally the course will introduce the student to change at the individual, group and organizational levels so they can function effectively as catalysts for change or as members of a change process.

MGT 675 Leadership: Communication and Influence (3)
Communication concepts and theories that describe and explain interactions among organizational members at all levels are examined in this course. Key to this examination is the opportunity for students to observe, analyze and practice effective interaction patterns. Topics of discussion include: upward, downward and horizontal communication; formal and informal communication (grapevine); superior-subordinate communication; performance evaluation; information overload; conflict and negotiation; power, politics, and influence; and organizational culture.

MGT 680 Organizational Research and Change (3)
Prerequisite(s): 24 hours completed in the MSOL program
This course focuses on the knowledge and skills to improve organizational effectiveness by identifying, diagnosing, and formulating solutions to problems in the workplace. Topics include the research process, exploratory research, qualitative and quantitative methods, action research, and reporting of findings. Emphasis will be on the understanding necessary to lead planned change and renewal in organizations through application of collaborative, systematic skills and methods.

MGT 690 Organizational Research and Change II (3)
Prerequisite(s): MGT 680
This course builds on the foundation of MGT 680 and other MSOL courses. The student will identify an organizational problem or opportunity in an organization with which they are familiar and apply a research method to gather data to clarify the nature of the problem and then propose solution. This is the capstone course in the MSOL program.

MKT 520 Marketing for Management (3)
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300 and ECO 211 or 212
Provides an understanding of the administration and the management of the marketing function including the treatment of marketing planning and strategy. Students will develop the knowledge to plan, apply, and manage marketing concepts in organizational decision making (operational, tactical, and strategic).

MOL 600 Exploring Leadership (3)
Prerequisite(s): Must be taken in the first nine hours of course work
This course explores the meaning of leadership across time, culture and contexts and also examines classic writings on leadership, the most recent leadership theories and research, and popular contemporary management books on leadership. Special attention will be given to theories that emphasize the role of values and ethics in leadership. Students also begin assessing their own leadership skills.

MOL 605 Methods of Organizational Research (3)
This course introduces the organizational research process, the ethical issues involved in organizational research, the methodologies employed to analyze data, and the appropriate methods of effectively reporting organizational research results. Emphasis will be placed on critical thinking and analysis.

MOL 675 Seminar in Org Leadership (3)
A course which examines current topics in Organization Leadership. Students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum.

MOL 690 Integrative Project (3)
Prerequisite(s): MOL 600, PSY 610/MGT 610 and MOL 605 plus successful completion of 24 hours in MSOL program
This course is an integrative experience in which the student applies the knowledge, skills and understanding developed in the Master of Science in Organizational Leadership program. This seminar allows for a structured approach as individuals work on their own independent projects. It also provides opportunities to learn and share together about those projects and the process of doing an applied academic project. The project itself may take a variety of forms and will result in a formal report demonstrating program learning. This course is designed to be completed in the final semester of the program.

MUS 550 Choral Workshop (1)
New Course
Type in your course description here. MUS 550 is a short term one day workshop designed for choral teachers and university students to study choral techniques, rehearsal techniques, and to be introduced to new choral literature

MUS 551 Instrumental Workshop (1-3)
New Course
Type in your course description here. MUS 551 is a short term one day workshop designed for instrumental teachers and university students to study instrumental techniques, rehearsal techniques, and to be introduced to new instrumental literature.

MUS 552 Strings Workshop (1)
One day workshop designed for string teachers and university students to study the techniques for string playing and/or orchestra rehearsal techniques which would be helpful for public school teaching.

NUR 500 Health Assessment (3)
Corequisite(s): NUR 501, 515, 521
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 500A
This course presents the art and science of assessing the health of clients across the lifespan. The content addresses the purpose and method of obtaining a comprehensive holistic client database using a nursing assessment model. Strategies for drawing inferences about the health status of clients using epidemiological, social, and environmental data is discussed. The use of effective communication techniques to obtain assessment data is addressed. Deviations in health patterns are identified by comparing assessment data to norms, standards, and theories. Assessment findings are documented in a manner appropriate for an interdisciplinary health care community.

NUR 500A Health Assessment Lab (0)
Corequisite(s): NUR 501, 515, 521
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 500
This course is the lab component of NUR 500

NUR 501 Evidence-Based Primary Health Nursing with Chronically Ill Clients (5)
Corequisite(s): NUR 500, 515, 521
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 501A, 501C
This course introduces the student to clinical reasoning and the nursing process as a systematic method for determining the health care concerns of clients within the framework of primary health care. Content fundamental to primary prevention, secondary prevention, and implementation of therapeutic interventions related to common/chronic health care concerns is presented. Teaching principles are introduced and incorporated into the nursing process as a means of promoting health among clients of varying developmental stages and ethno-cultural backgrounds. Nursing care that facilitates the client's activities of daily living and that is consistent with the client's ethno-cultural values and beliefs is implemented. Application of the concepts and content fundamental to the practice of nursing is addressed in an on-campus skills laboratory and in clinical settings in the community. NUR 501C is the clinical component of NUR 501. Students have to pass NUR 500/500A to begin NUR 501C.

NUR 501A Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Chronically Ill Clients LAB (0)
Corequisite(s): NUR 500, 515, 521
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 501, 501C
This course is the lab component of NUR 501

NUR 501C Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Chronically Ill Clients Clinical (0)
Corequisite(s): NUR 500, 515, 521
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 501, 501A
This course is the clinical component of NUR 501

NUR 501S Serv Lrng:Evidence-Based Primary Health Nursing with Chronically Ill Clients (1) EXP
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 501
Service Learning is an opportunity to engage in service to others while making academic connections to course material. This one credit hour course requires 30 hours of meaningful community service. Students will serve a community partner accomplishing projects relevant to the academic course to which the Service Learning credit is attached. Students will also be required to engage in different forms of reflection such as journaling, group guided reflection, and a one-on-one meeting with the course instructor. Students will develop a greater understanding of social problems, a sense of responsibility to our surrounding communities, and an increased awareness of their own faith and values.

NUR 503 Evidence-Based Population Focused Primary Health Care (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 500, 501, 515, 521
Corequisite(s): NUR 506, 511, 512, 531
This course emphasizes promoting population-focused primary health care. Concepts from nursing and health, liberal arts and sciences, and the sociopolitical, cultural and economic dimensions of the community as a whole are synthesized in examining the idea of healthy communities. Emphasis is on community-identified capacities, the needs and diversity of individuals and communities, social issues and lifestyle choices. Students partner with professionals and residents in a community to analyze community assets and health problems.

NUR 504 Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Women and Infants (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 503, 506, 511, 512, 531
Corequisite(s): NUR 505, 632, 710
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 514
This course explores the needs and health concerns of women across the life span and the unique needs of newborns in the first 28 days of life. Theoretical elements required to manage the health care of women and infants are discussed. Clinical reasoning and the nursing process are used within the primary health care framework to plan care for women which fosters health promotion, maintenance, and restoration, as they move through the preconceptual, prenatal, intrapartum, postpartum, and perimenopausal periods of their lives. Assessment and care of the newborn is explored within a family-centered care context. High-risk maternity disorders are discussed; the role of the nurse as part of the interdisciplinary team is emphasized. Current nursing and related scientific research is discussed in relation to current practice. Community concepts include non-acute care birth settings, postpartum/newborn care at home, and epidemiological concepts related to women and childbearing.

NUR 505 Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Children and Families (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 503, 506, 511, 512, 531
Corequisite(s): NUR 504, 632, 710
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 514
This course explores the needs of pediatric clients and their families. Theoretical elements required to manage the pediatric client experiencing a variety of health alterations are discussed. Clinical reasoning and the nursing process are used within the primary health care framework to plan developmentally appropriate care which fosters health promotion, maintenance, and restoration. High-risk pediatric and neonatal issues are discussed; the role of the nurse as part of the interdisciplinary team is emphasized. Current nursing and related scientific research in pediatrics is discussed in relation to current practice. Professional issues related to the professional pediatric nurse are explored. Community concepts including home visit process, referrals, resources, school-based nursing and public health concerns related to the pediatric client and family are discussed.

NUR 506 Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Mentally Ill (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 500, 501, 515, 521
Corequisite(s): NUR 503, 511, 531
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 512
This course explores the needs of mental health clients and their families. Theoretical elements required to manage the mental health client experiencing a variety of health alterations are discussed. Clinical reasoning and the nursing process are used within the primary health care framework to plan developmentally appropriate care which fosters health promotion, maintenance, and restoration. The role of the nurse as part of the interdisciplinary team is emphasized. Current nursing and related scientific research in mental health is discussed in relation to current practice. Professional issues related to the professional mental health nurse are explored. Community concepts including home visit process, referrals, resources, and public health concerns related to the mental health client and family are discussed.

NUR 508 Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Critically Ill Clients (6)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 514
Corequisite(s): NUR 640
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 508A, 508C
This course focuses on using clinical reasoning and the nursing process to care for clients experiencing conditions that are life threatening and/or involve multiple body systems. Complex medical-surgical conditions in adults are discussed in terms of pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatments that are based on current research. Content focuses on acute and rehabilitation phases of these conditions and use of advanced technology and resources in the hospital, home, and community settings. The role of the nurse in the care of clients with these conditions is emphasized within the context of the liberal arts and sciences, nursing theories, research and advanced technology within a primary health care environment. Competencies in communication with diverse populations, leadership and management, delegation, coordination and evaluation of client care, critical thinking, and interdisciplinary collaboration are enhanced. A clinical rotation in an intensive care unit will provide practical application of this high risk content.

NUR 508A Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Critically Ill Clients LAB (0)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 514
Corequisite(s): NUR 640
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 508, 508C
This course is the lab component of NUR 508

NUR 508C Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Critically Ill Clients Clinical (0)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 514
Corequisite(s): NUR 509, 510, 640
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 508, 508A
This course is the clinical component of NUR 508

NUR 509 Primary Health Care Preceptorship (5)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 508
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 510
In this final clinical course, students will work one-on-one under the guidance of a professional nurse in an acute care facility. Clinical reasoning, increased initiative and independence in caring for clients, and the ability to synthesize bodies of data to provide evidence-based care are emphasized. Students demonstrate that they met the course outcomes by doing an integrative project that combines clinical reasoning and professional competence.

NUR 510 Primary Health Care Seminar (1)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 508,NUR 640
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 509
This seminar is designed to be a synthesizing experience which blends theory with clinical practice from the student's preceptorship. Personal development, socialization into the professional role and career goals will be examined. Preparation for the licensing exam (NCLEX-RN) will be reinforced for entry into practice.

NUR 511 Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Nursing with Acutely Ill Clients (4)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 500, 501, 515, 521
Corequisite(s): NUR 503, 506, 531
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 512
This course is a continuation of NUR 501 and is taken concurrently with NUR 512 which provides a clinical application of the content. The focus of the course is illness intervention and health management with individuals experiencing medical/surgical problems. Current research, standards of care, and clinical pathways are considered when discussing a variety of conditions. Conditions and therapeutic nursing care are discussed within a nursing process framework, emphasizing pathophysiology, theory, evidence-based practice, and interdisciplinary aspects of patient care.

NUR 512 Evidence-Based Primary Health Care Clinical with Acutely Ill Clients (4)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 500, 501, 515, 521
Corequisite(s): NUR 503, 506, 531
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 506, 511
This course is a co-requisite for NUR 511 and NUR 506 and provides a practical application of its content. The focus of the course is illness intervention and health management with individuals experiencing medical/surgical/mental health problems in the acute care setting. Emphasis is placed on developing assessment skills, making clinical judgments, and implementing safe, effective nursing care. Students use critical thinking and communication skills to implement therapeutic nursing interventions in clients with acute/chronic conditions.

NUR 514 Primary Health Care Clinical (4)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 506, 511, 512, 531
Corequisite(s): NUR 632, 710
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 504, 505
This course involves clinical experiences in three areas: maternity, pediatric, and medical surgical nursing. The focus of the course is on using clinical reasoning and the nursing process within the primary health care framework to provide nursing care to clients across the life span in a variety of inpatient and outpatient clinical settings. Using communication and critical thinking skills, the student works in partnership with others to provide holistic health care to identified clients from culturally and socio-economically diverse settings.

NUR 515 Professional Roles and Issues (3)
Corequisite(s): NUR 500, 501, 521
This course introduces the student to the profession of nursing as it exists as an art and a science in contemporary health care settings. The evolution of nursing and current trends/issues are explored as the basis for the practice of professional nursing in today's health care arena. The role of the nurse as a professional partnering within interprofessional teams in the workplace is emphasized. Ethical, legal, regulatory, and professional standards are analyzed as a basis for nursing practice.

NUR 521 Pharmacology/Medication Administration (5)
Corequisite(s): NUR 500, NUR 501/501A/501C, NUR 515
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 521A
This course examines mechanisms of drug action, indications, contraindications, adverse effects, and interactions of major contemporary drugs. Nursing interventions related to evaluation of drug appropriateness, administration, management of side effects/adverse effects, evaluation of effectiveness and patient education are explored. Effects of drug therapy on health promotion, health maintenance, and restoration are emphasized. Current evidence about pharmacologic therapy medication administration will be discussed in relation to current practice. Emphasis will focus on the care of clients receiving medication across the life span and in culturally and socioeconomically diverse settings. Techniques involved in the calculation of drug dosages, regulation and maintenance of controlled substances, I.V. therapy and administration of medications in parenteral and non-parenteral forms are presented and practiced. Professional issues related to the role of the professional nurse in medication administration are explored.

NUR 521A Pharmacology/Medication Administration LAB (0)
Corequisite(s): NUR 500, 501, 515
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 521
This course is the lab component of NUR 521

NUR 521B Pharmacology/Medication Administration (4)
Corequisite(s): NUR 500,NUR 501,NUR 515
Concurrent requisite(s): NUR 521A
This course examines mechanisms of drug action, indications, contraindications, adverse effects, and interactions of major contemporary drugs. Nursing interventions related to evaluation of drug appropriateness, administration, management of side effects/adverse effects, evaluation of effectiveness and patient education are explored. Effects of drug therapy on health promotion, health maintenance, and restoration are emphasized. Current evidence about pharmacologic therapy medication administration will be discussed in relation to current practice. Emphasis will focus on the care of clients receiving medication across the life span and in culturally and socioeconomically diverse settings. Techniques involved in the calculation of drug dosages, regulation and maintenance of controlled substances, I.V. therapy and administration of medications in parenteral and non-parenteral forms are presented and practiced. Professional issues related to the role of the professional nurse in medication administration are explored.

NUR 531 Foundations of Nursing Research & Evidence Based Practice (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 500, 501, 515, 521
Corequisite(s): NUR 503, 506, 511, 512
This course is designed to help students explore the development of nursing knowledge through theory and research. An overview of philosophical and historical influences on the development of theory and research in nursing and related fields are explored. Processes to critique, evaluate and utilize theories and research findings are discussed. Students explore the foundational concepts and processes of meaningful, rigorous research within the context of clinical phenomena. Students have the opportunity to apply and practice these processes throughout the course through analytical reviews of relevant research. The role of the nurse researcher in promoting evidence-based practice and making the connection between theory, science and practice is emphasized.

NUR 552 Master of Nursing Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study under the guidance of a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) faculty member to meet stated objectives. This course is designed to enrich the learning of the MSN student. Students develop a proposal with desired goals for the experience. Written permission of School Dean and MSN faculty member required.

NUR 552E Master of Nursing Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study under the guidance of a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) faculty member to meet stated objectives. This course is designed to enrich the learning of the MSN student. Students develop a proposal with desired goals for the experience. Written permission of School Dean and MSN faculty member required.

NUR 632 Evidence-Based Nursing Practice and Translational Science (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 531
Corequisite(s): NUR 504, 505, 514, 710
This course builds on concepts learned in NUR 531 and emphasizes the critical appraisal and application of research findings to improve outcomes. Translational science including the development and analysis of data is discussed. Evidence based practice including identification of a clinical issue, formulation of a researchable question, and performing an effective/efficient search for sound evidence is explored. Students will search for the best evidence on a clinical issue and develop a plan to implement an evidence based practice change.

NUR 640 Health Care Policy (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 710
Corequisite(s): NUR 508
The purpose of this course is for the student to gain a historical, political, economic, social, and financial perspective on the health care system in the United States. Delivery of health care, health care policies, financing of health care, and health care reform will be discussed with an emphasis on the leadership role nurses can take in affecting the health care system. Areas of exploration include: cost containment, managed care, social justice issues, legislative and regulatory controls, globalization and ethical/legal issues.

NUR 700 Advanced Pathopharmacology (3)
This course examines physiologic and pathologic changes in body systems in response to disease states and discusses principles essential for the advanced practice nurse when implementing pharmacotherapy to these patients. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of changes in normal functions which may be indicative of a disease state or a response to pharmacologic therapy. Pathogenesis and compensatory mechanisms for major disease states are examined. Current evidence related to pathologic changes in disease and treatment is analyzed. Ethical, legal, and regulatory concerns related to pharmacotherapy are discussed. Strategies for single and multiple drugs treatments are evaluated. Issues in pharmacotherapy such as access, cost effectiveness, and safety are also examined.

NUR 701 Advanced Health Assessment (3)
This course focuses on the acquisition of a comprehensive client database, incorporating a health history and an advanced health assessment for management of a client throughout the lifespan. This course builds upon prior knowledge and experience with anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, and basic health assessment skills. Pathophysiological changes as well as psychosocial, ethnic, cultural, and developmental variations relevant to the client/family are also considered. Emphasis is placed on applying strategies for critical analysis and diagnostic reasoning.

NUR 702 Clinical Specialty Practicum (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 700, 701
This course provides students with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge from previous MSN advanced practice courses and to apply them in an actual practice setting. Settings are collaboratively selected by the student and faculty advisor to meet the student's learning needs. An individualized learning contract is developed to guide the student's experience. During these intensive immersion experiences, students master advanced patient care delivery skills, acquire knowledge of organizational dynamics, and further explore advanced practice roles. Students also develop a foundation for their future professional career trajectory.

NUR 704 Clinical Nurse Leader Roles and Ethical Considerations (3)
This course provides an overview of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role, from its inception, to the current health care environment, and beyond. Students will evaluate roles and responsibilities of the CNL at the microsystem level of clinical practice, to optimize individual patient health outcomes. Concepts of intra- and interprofessional collaboration, social justice, ethical leadership, sound fiscal stewardship, and communication strategies, utilized by the CNL in improving patient outcomes, will be explored.

NUR 705 Advanced Pathophysiology (3)
This course examines physiologic and pathologic changes in body systems in response to disease states. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of cellular changes in normal functions which may be indicative of a disease state or a response to pharmacologic therapy. Pathogenesis and compensatory mechanisms for major disease states are examined. Concepts related to disease management are emphasized. Current research related to pathologic changes in disease and treatment is analyzed.

NUR 706 Advanced Pharmacology (3)
This course examines mechanisms of drug action, indications, therapeutic effects, adverse effects, and contraindications of major drug classes as well as nursing interventions. Pharmacotherapy in special populations and complex cases is emphasized. Strategies for single and multiple drugs treatments are evaluated and implemented. Issues in pharmacotherapy such as access, cost effectiveness, and safety are also examined. Evidence-based decision making in pharmacotherapy is emphasized. Ethical, legal, and regulatory concerns related to pharmacotherapy are discussed.

NUR 707 Managing and Advocating for Vulnerable Patients (3)
The focus of this course is on the nurse leading, designing, coordinating and managing care as part of an interprofessional team to improve patient outcomes. Skills and abilities needed to assume a horizontal leadership role at the microsystem level, such as communication, delegation, collaboration, negotiation, are reviewed and practiced. The principles and processes of case management are included as a tool for the nurse to coordinate patient-centered care, while considering quality, safety, cost containment, ethics, cultural sensitivity, technology, and available resources.

NUR 708 Clinical Nurse Leader Immersion (6)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 701, 705, 706
In this culminating course of the program students identify an evidence-based practice project related to the CNL role and improving patient outcomes on a clinical unit. Advanced clinical practice in the CNL role forms the basis of this immersion project. The project should represent an innovative response to a specific need in a patient population.

NUR 710 Exploring Leadership in Nursing (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 503, NUR 506, NUR 511, NUR 512, NUR 531
Corequisite(s): NUR 504, NUR 505, NUR 514, NUR 632
In this course students explore a multitude of leadership concepts and theories in-depth. Students examine the role and responsibilities of the nurse leader working in interprofessional teams emphasizing the abilities and processes needed to create the future of nursing. The focus is on developing his or her personal style of leadership in the context of the challenges facing nursing in a changing health care environment.

NUR 720 Teaching & Learning Theories and Strategies (3)
This course provides an introduction to the principles of teaching and learning in nursing education. The student is introduced to general concepts in nursing education including teaching and learning theories, learning styles, active learning, and technology-assisted strategies. The student is encouraged to explore his or her own philosophy of teaching and learning and teaching style.

NUR 721 Curriculum Development in Nursing Education (3)
This course provides a broad exploration of curriculum and course development in nursing education. The student has the opportunity to participate in all aspects of curriculum development from a faculty perspective including assuring congruency and internal consistency, writing outcomes, syllabus creation, and lesson planning.

NUR 722 Evaluation in Nursing Education (3)
This course provides an overview of the principles of course and program evaluation. Program evaluation theory provides the foundation upon which course and program evaluation is built. The student learns all aspects of evaluation including test construction, test item analysis, course and clinical evaluation, program evaluation, and curricular and outcomes evaluation.

NUR 723 Nursing Education Practicum (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 720, 721, 722
In this course, the student will apply theory and knowledge from previous education and clinical coursework to teaching nurses/nursing students in a variety of settings. Individualized learning contracts are developed to guide the students' teaching experiences. This experience takes place under the supervision of an experienced nurse/faculty member and is intended to prepare the student for future teaching experiences in the areas in which they hope to be employed.

NUR 730 Human Resource Management for Nursing Administrators (3)
This course explores the practical knowledge needed to manage human resources in a healthcare setting. The focus is to deliver skills and knowledge to nurse administrators related to: recruitment; interviewing; hiring; termination; assessment and evaluation; development of personnel policies; benefits; and safety and health in the workplace.

NUR 731 Strategic Management in Nursing Administration (3)
This course explores concepts of strategic planning of healthcare systems. The focus is to deliver skills and knowledge to nurse administrators related to strategic planning. Concepts throughout the course include business concepts, trends, and issues facing a dynamic healthcare environment.

NUR 732 Organizational Management of Health Care Systems (3)
This course will explore organizational components involved in complex healthcare systems of today. Concepts throughout the course include organizational theory, organizational behavior, organizational innovation and change, organizational design and performance. The overall management role will be examined as it relates to each of the concepts.

NUR 733 Finance for Nurse Administrators (3)
This course explores the financial management of healthcare systems. The focus is to understand business and economic principles along with legal and political issues effecting healthcare financial management. Concepts throughout the course include business and economic principles, ethics, legalities, workload management, and forecasting.

NUR 734 Nurse Administration Practicum I (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 730, 731, 732, 733
In this course, the student will apply theory and knowledge from previous administration coursework in an organizational setting under the supervision of an experienced faculty member. Students identify principles of leadership, evidence-based practice decision-making models, negotiation, resource allocation, team coordination, and cultural awareness. Individual learning contracts guide the student's learning experiences. Settings are collaboratively selected by the student and faculty advisor to meet the student's learning needs.

NUR 735 Nursing Administration Practicum II (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 734
In this course, the student will synthesize theory and knowledge from previous coursework in an organizational setting under the supervision of an experienced faculty member. Students apply principles of leadership, evidence-based practice decision-making models, negotiation, resource allocation, team coordination, and cultural awareness. Individual learning contracts guide the student's learning experiences. Settings are collaboratively selected by the student and faculty advisor to meet the student's learning needs.

NUR 740 Integrative Project in Nursing Education (3)
In this culminating course of the program students identify an evidence-based practice project related to nursing education. Advanced clinical practice and educational theory and principles form the basis of this scholarly project. The project should represent an innovative response to an educational need.

NUR 741 Integrative Project in Nursing Administration (3)
In this culminating course of the program students identify an evidence-based practice project related to nursing administration. Organizational theory forms the basis of this scholarly project. The project should represent an innovative response to an administrative organizational need.

NUR 800 Theoretical & Philosophical Perspectives for Evidence Based Practice (3)
This course is designed to facilitate student exploration of the development of nursing knowledge and theory as a foundation for evidenced based practice. Historical events relevant to the development of nursing are analyzed. Empiric, aesthetic, ethical, personal, and emancipatory theory development in nursing and related disciplines is explored. Students will synthesize theoretical and philosophical knowledge to create a conceptual model for evidenced based nursing practice.

NUR 801 Biostatistics for Evidence Based Practice (3)
This course focuses on the application of statistical concepts in the analysis of research for evidence based practice. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests are reviewed. Analysis of variance, regression, correlation and multivariate tests are emphasized. Concepts related to the application of statistical procedures for the appraisal of evidence are emphasized. Tests used in meta-analysis are also discussed. Common statistical software are explored to enhance the appraisal of evidence.

NUR 802 Evidence Based Practice (3)
This course emphasizes the critical appraisal and application of evidence to implement change and improve outcomes in practice. Evidence-based practice models will be explored including identification of a clinical issue, formulation of a researchable question, and performing an efficient search for sound evidence. Methodologies for the identification of practice problems and the evaluation and application of scientific evidence to practice issues will be proposed. Students will evaluate outcomes in a selected practice setting and develop a change project based on this outcome analysis.

NUR 803 Building Collaborative Relationships (3)
This course focuses on applying the skills needed to participate in and lead interprofessional teams in today's complex health care environment. Integration of advanced communication techniques, leadership skills, health care economics, and organizational issues are considered when evaluating health care practices. Negotiation, collaboration, interprofessional team development, and change are concepts central to this course presented in the context of leading care in complex healthcare delivery systems.

NUR 804 Global Health Care Policy (3)
This course examines health promotion needs of various patients and vulnerable populations. Cultural and ethnic identity, socio-economic conditions, emotional and spiritual needs and values of patients and populations locally, nationally, and globally are examined. Health care policy is evaluated for efficiency, effectiveness, and equity related to health disparities, culture, ethics, globalization, access, economics, and social justice. Students will evaluate health care policy to improve the health of individuals and populations.

NUR 805 Transforming Health Care Through Technology (3)
This course examines the use of information management systems to improve the safety, quality, cost-effectiveness, and coordination of health care. Students explore information systems technology used in today's health care organizations for quality improvement. The student is introduced to broad areas of information technology: use of patient care and other technologies to deliver and enhance care; communication technologies to integrate and coordinate care; data management to analyze and improve outcomes of care; and health information management for evidence-based care and health education. Students also examine information systems and patient care technologies in terms of ethics, legalities, regulatory issues, patient outcomes, cost, and ease of use. Consumer health information sources are evaluated for accuracy, timeliness, and appropriateness.

NUR 812 Epidemiology and Population Health (3)
This course provides an overview of global health through analysis of biostatistical data and application of the epidemiologic concepts related to populations at risk. The history of diseases, levels of prevention, cultural and socioeconomical determinants of health, host-agent-environment relationships and epidemiological research are explored in terms of promoting global health. Students will examine evidence-based strategies to promote health in the most vulnerable populations. The leadership role of the nurse in clinical prevention, improvement of population health, and elimination of health disparities of vulnerable populations is emphasized.

NUR 821 Strategic Management and Financial Controls of Health Care Organizations (3)
This course explores strategic management and financial controls of healthcare organizations. Various concepts of strategic management are examined. Concepts include formulation, implementation and strategy control of a strategic plan. Financial controls such as principles of finance and budgeting and trends in financial resource control in healthcare organizations are also explored.

NUR 823 Nursing Practicum I (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 800, NUR 801, NUR 802, NUR 803, NUR 804, NUR 805
In this course, the student will synthesize and expand on the knowledge learned from DNP course work by collaborating with experts in complex healthcare organizations. The practicum provides experiences to construct and integrate knowledge for advanced nursing practice at a high level of complexity. The experiences provide the context in which the final DNP product is completed. Individual practicum agreements guide the student's experiences.

NUR 824 Nursing Practicum II (3)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 823
In this course the student will synthesize and expand on the knowledge learned from DNP course work by collaborating with experts in complex healthcare organizations. The practicum provides experiences to construct and integrate knowledge at a high level of complexity. The experiences provide the context in which the final DNP product is completed. Individual practicum agreements guide the student's experiences.

NUR 825 Doctor of Nursing Practice Independent Study (1-3)
This course allows for the exploration of special topics or experiences of interest to individual students to enrich specific courses or expand on experiences requiring in-depth study. Students, in consultation with the faculty member assigned to the independent study, identify an area of study, establish objectives, and agree to a learning contract for credits earned. Students are expected to meet regularly with the faculty member for consultation and discussion. The faculty member has the responsibility for evaluating the student's achievement.

NUR 832 Doctor of Nursing Practice Project (6)
Prerequisite(s): NUR 824
This course focuses on the refinement, implementation, evaluation, and presentation of the scholarly DNP project designed to improve practice of patient outcomes. Students work collaboratively with committee members to conclude their course of study.

PAS 500 PA Profession: Evolving Issues in Medicine and Ethics (2)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the PA Program
Corequisite(s): BIO 515/515A, BIO 520, BIO 525, PAS 505/505A, and PAS 510
This course introduces the student to the history of the PA profession and the role of the Physician Assistant in health care delivery. Additional topics include legal and health policy factors which affect clinical practice, professionalism issues, and ethical standards as well as professional and inter-professional relationships.

PAS 505 Medical Interview and Physical Examination with Lab (3)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the PA Program
Corequisite(s): BIO 515/515A, BIO 520, BIO 525, PAS 500 and PAS 510
This is a foundational PA course which will provide students with the essential skills to perform a comprehensive medical interview and physical examination. The course introduces the students how to properly perform a physical exam, to document the patient encounter, reinforcing utilization of correct medical terminology. This will be done using an organ system approach. Upon completion of this course, the student will perform and accurately document a comprehensive history & physical assessment.

PAS 505A Medical Interview and Physical Examination (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 505
This course is the lab component of PAS 505

PAS 510 Evidence Based Medicine and Population Health (2)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the PA Program
Corequisite(s): BIO 515/515A, BIO 520, BIO 525, PAS 500 and PAS 505/505A
This course will serve as a foundational review of epidemiology and of evidence based medical research. Students will review trends in population medicine and analyze published medical studies before selecting patient education and prevention tools. By addressing additional topics, such as research bias, barriers to health literacy, statistical significance in a research study, students will begin to develop cultural competency in their approach to patient communications.

PAS 530 Pharmacology I (3)
Corequisite(s): PAS 535, PAS 540/540A, PAS 545/PAS 545A, and PAS 550
This is a foundational course which utilizes a clinical approach to pharmacology, emphasizing the fundamentals of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. The course focuses on the relationship between drugs and receptors, adverse drug reactions, toxicity, indications and contraindications of drugs. Pharmaco-therapeutics with application to clinical patient scenarios is also incorporated in this course and aligned with the topics found in PAS 535 Principles of Medicine I.

PAS 535 Principles of Medicine I (4)
Corequisite(s): PAS 530, PAS 540/540A, PAS 545/545A and PAS 550
This course is an intensive study of the principles essential to the practice of primary care medicine. Utilizing a systems based approach, lectures will review the etiology, pathophysiology as well as introduce the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and management of the outlined diseases in the following body systems: dermatology, EENT, hematology, immunology, endocrinology, cardiology and pulmonary, Through assigned readings, case based exercises and unit examinations, the PA student will develop a solid foundation of the clinical concepts essential for optimal patient care.

PAS 540 Patient Assessment I with LAB (3)
Corequisite(s): PAS 530, PAS 535, PAS 545/545A, and PAS 550
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 540A
This course builds upon the studentís previous physical assessment skills with the goal of developing competencies with specialty and focused physical exam assessment skills. Weekly specialty exams will be reviewed with complimentary written and presentation practice skills assigned. This will be done using an organ system approach. The learning experiences will focus development of a detailed and thorough problem focused history and physical examination over the spectrum of ages and clinical situations. This semester students will continue to develop the appropriate differential diagnosis and plan for further evaluation of an identified problem with accurate presentation of information in both written and oral forms. Standardized focused patient encounters will re-enforce clinical interviewing and physical exam skills to prepare each student for success in the clinical year.

PAS 540A Patient Assessment I (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 540
This course is the lab component of PAS 540.

PAS 545 Clinical Skills in Medicine I with LAB (2)
Corequisite(s): PAS 530, PAS 535, PAS 540/540A, and PAS 550
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 545A
This course introduces the Physician Assistant student to diagnostic testing, various clinical skills procedures and routine radiology tests utilized in clinical medicine. The content is sequenced to compliment topics in other MSJU PA course work. Students will gain insight about when to use, how to interpret as well as effectively utilize the clinical lab and radiology results. A practicum lab setting will allow students to perform various procedures as they correlate to routine care, and to identify or to treat a particular diagnosis.

PAS 545A Clinical Skills in Medicine I (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 545
This course is the lab component of PAS 545

PAS 550 Clinical Approach to Behavioral Health (2)
Prerequisite(s): PAS 530, PAS 535, PAS 540/540A, PAS 545/545A
This course is an overview of behavioral health with an emphasis on a compassionate and comprehensive clinical approach. The goal is to equip students with a solid understanding of the presentation for behavioral health conditions as well as recognize the red flags for serious mental health diseases.

PAS 555 Pharmacology II (3)
Corequisite(s): PAS 560, PAS 565, PAS 570/570A, PAS 575/575A, and PAS 580
This course continues the PA student's study of clinical pharmacology. The course is aligned with the topics presented in Principles of Medicine II to emphasize and correlate the fundamentals of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. The course focuses on the relationship between drugs and receptors, adverse drug reactions, toxicity, indications and contraindications of drugs. Pharmaco-therapeutics with application to clinical patient scenarios is also incorporated in this course.

PAS 560 Principles of Medicine II (6)
Corequisite(s): PAS 555, PAS 565, PAS 570/570A, PAS 575/575A and PAS 580
This course is an intensive study of the principles essential to the practice of primary care medicine. Utilizing a system based approach; lectures will review the etiology, pathophysiology as well as introduce the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and management of the outlined diseases in the following body systems: gastrointestinal, hepato-renal disease, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, rheumatology, neurology, psychology, woman's health, ICU medicine and emergency medicine. Assigned readings, case based exercises and unit examinations will provide a solid foundation of the clinical concepts essential for optimal patient care.

PAS 565 Clinical Decision Making (2)
Corequisite(s): PAS 555, PAS 560, PAS 570/570A, PAS 575/575A and PAS 580
This pivotal course will provide the student with the essential tools to develop confidence in their clinical assessment ability. The goal is to apply and to integrate their medical knowledge into an appropriate differential diagnosis and subsequently determine the most likely diagnosis. Comprehensive care plans will be reviewed and revised to better equip each student with tools to address health literacy and other confounding issues.

PAS 570 Patient Assessment II with LAB (3)
Corequisite(s): PAS 555, PAS 560, PAS 565, PAS 575/575A, and PAS 580
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 570A
This course builds upon the studentís previous physical assessment skills with the goal of developing competencies with specialty and focused physical exam. Specialty exams will be reviewed with complimentary written and presentation practice skills assigned. Assessment for a sports physical, occupational medicine, and fall risk evaluation will be introduced. Assessment of patients in various stages of life will be reviewed such as an evaluation of an older adult, pregnant patients & pediatric population. Documentation skills within varied clinical settings will be reinforced. Health literacy, cultural competency, patient counseling will be interwoven in this final semester. Standardized focused patient encounters will re-enforce clinical interviewing and physical exam skills to prepare each student for success in the upcoming clinical year.

PAS 570A Patient Assessment II (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 570
This course is the lab component of PAS 570

PAS 575 Clinical Skills in Medicine II with LAB (2)
Corequisite(s): PAS 555, PAS 560, PAS 565, PAS 570/570A, and PAS 580
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 575A
This course continues the development of each Physician Assistant student's clinical skills and radiographic interpretation ability. The content is sequenced to compliment topics in other MSJU PA course work. Students will gain insight about when to use, how to interpret as well as effectively utilize the clinical labs and radiology result. The topic focus will be surgical, orthopedic, neurologic care and critical care concepts. A practicum lab setting will allow students to perform various procedures as they correlate to routine care or to the diagnosis and treatment of a particular diagnosis.

PAS 575A Clinical Skills in Medicine II (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PAS 575
This course is the lab component for PAS 575

PAS 580 Nutrition and Preventive Medicine Across the Life Span (2)
Corequisite(s): PAS 555, PAS 560, PAS 565, PAS 570/570A and PAS 575/575A
This course will highlight prevention and nutrition guidelines spanning from pre-natal recommendations to end of life care. By focusing on a patient's age, the student will develop and apply patient education and prevention strategies. This course will integrate previous PA course work with a goal to improve prevention, patient safety and healthy life-style compliance. Health literacy, ethical care and cultural awareness will highlight the need to revise clinical recommendations based upon the individual patient.

PAS 600 Family Medicine I (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for the Family Medicine patient. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in the Family Medicine setting. The course will take place in the urgent care setting, outpatient clinic, inpatient hospital setting and/or nursing home. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to be responsible for patients of all ages, from the initial visit through possible hospitalization and follow-up. The student will have the opportunity to obtain a medical history, perform physical exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic studies, propose a treatment plan, perform common procedures, and provide patient education on diagnosis, prevention and health maintenance of disease processes. This rotation will provide exposure to common clinical skills and procedures that are specific to Family Medicine.

PAS 605 Family Medicine II (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for the Family Medicine patient. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in the Family Medicine setting. The course will take place in the urgent care setting, outpatient clinic, inpatient hospital setting and/or nursing home. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to be responsible for patients of all ages, from the initial visit through possible hospitalization and follow-up. The student will have the opportunity to obtain a medical history, perform physical exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic studies, propose a treatment plan, perform common procedures, and provide patient education on diagnosis, prevention and health maintenance of disease processes. This rotation will provide exposure to common clinical skills and procedures that are specific to Family Medicine.

PAS 610 Internal Medicine (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for the Internal Medicine patient. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in the Internal Medicine setting. The course will take place in the outpatient clinic, inpatient hospital setting, long term care facility and/or intensive care unit. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to be responsible for adult and geriatric patients from the initial visit through possible hospitalization and follow up. The student will have the opportunity to obtain a medical history, perform physical exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic tests, propose a treatment plan, and provide patient education on diagnosis, prevention and health maintenance of disease processes. This rotation will provide exposure to common clinical skills and procedures that are specific to Internal Medicine.

PAS 620 Emergency Medicine (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for the Emergency Medicine patient. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in the Emergency Medicine setting. The course will take place in the urgent care or emergency department. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to be responsible for patients of all ages, from the initial visit through possible hospitalization. The student will have the opportunity to obtain medical histories, perform physical exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic tests, perform common procedures, propose a treatment plan, and provide patient education on diagnosis and treatment of disease processes. This rotation will provide exposure to common clinical skills and procedures that are specific to Emergency Medicine.

PAS 630 General Surgery (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for the General Surgery patient. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in the General Surgery setting. The course may take place in the outpatient clinic, freestanding surgical center, operating room and/or inpatient hospital setting. The rotation will provide the opportunity for the student to be responsible for patients of all ages, from the initial visit through possible hospitalization and follow-up (including pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative care). The student will have the opportunity to obtain medical histories, perform physical exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic tests, propose a treatment plan, perform common procedures, and provide patient education on diagnosis, prevention and health maintenance of disease processes. This rotation will provide exposure to common clinical skills and procedures that are specific to General Surgery.

PAS 640 Pediatrics (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for the Pediatric patient. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in the Pediatric Medicine setting. The course will take place in the outpatient clinic and/or inpatient hospital setting. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to be responsible for patients aged 0-18, from the initial visit through possible hospitalization and follow-up. The student will have the opportunity to obtain medical and family histories, perform physical exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic tests, propose a treatment plan, perform common procedures and provide patient/family education on diagnosis, prevention and health maintenance of disease processes. This rotation will provide exposure to common clinical skills and procedures that are specific to Pediatric Medicine.

PAS 650 Behavioral Health (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for the Behavioral Medicine patient. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders encountered in the Behavioral Medicine setting. The rotation may take place in the outpatient clinic, group home, schools, prison and/or inpatient hospital setting. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to be responsible for patients of various ages, from the initial visit through possible hospitalization and follow-up. Students will participate in activities of this rotation such as lectures, case management meetings, and group therapy sessions as directed by the preceptor. The student will have the opportunity to observe/perform intake exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic tests, propose a treatment plan, and provide patient education on diagnosis, prevention, and health maintenance of disease processes.

PAS 660 Women's Health (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in the Women's Health setting. The course will take place in the outpatient clinic, inpatient hospital setting and/or operating room. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to be responsible for adult and geriatric patients, from the initial visit through possible hospitalization and follow-up. This rotation will focus on general gynecologic health as well as routine pre-natal care. The student will have opportunity to obtain histories, perform physical exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic tests, propose a treatment plan, perform common procedures, and provide patient education on diagnosis, prevention and health maintenance of disease processes. This rotation will provide exposure to common clinical skills and procedures that are specific to Women's Health.

PAS 670 Orthopedics (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for the orthopedic patient. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in the orthopedic setting. The course will take place in the outpatient clinic, urgent care setting, inpatient hospital setting and/or nursing home. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to be responsible for patients of all ages, from the initial visit through possible hospitalization and follow-up. The student will have the opportunity to obtain a medical history, perform physical exams, develop a differential diagnosis, order/interpret appropriate diagnostic studies, propose a treatment plan, perform common procedures, and provide patient education on diagnosis, prevention and health maintenance of orthopedic injuries and disease processes. This rotation will provide exposure to common clinical skills and procedures that are specific to orthopedics.

PAS 700 Elective Clinical Experience I (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for patients in a clinical setting tailored to the student's particular interest. Approved supervised clinical experiences may be completed in any medical or surgical specialty. The student has discretion in selecting his/her elective and may design their own elective experience or choose from multiple disciplines after consulting with their faculty advisor and Clinical Director. All elective rotations must subsequently be approved by the Clinical or Program Director. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in that particular discipline. The experience may take place in the outpatient clinic, inpatient hospital setting, and/or other approved settings. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to learn about a specific disease process in great detail and to complete a written paper describing that disease, its diagnosis, treatment and prognosis utilizing evidence based medicine.

PAS 705 Elective Clinical Experience II (5)
Under the guidance of a qualified preceptor, this course will allow the student to provide care for patients in a clinical setting tailored to the student's particular interest. Approved supervised clinical experiences may be completed in any medical or surgical specialty. The student has discretion in selecting his/her elective and may design their own elective experience or choose from multiple disciplines after consulting with their faculty advisor and Clinical Director. All elective rotations must subsequently be approved by the Clinical or Program Director. This course will ensure that students are exposed to common disorders and procedures that are encountered in that particular discipline. The experience may take place in the outpatient clinic, inpatient hospital setting, and/or other approved settings. The rotation will provide opportunities for the student to learn about a specific disease process in great detail and to complete a written paper describing that disease, its diagnosis, treatment and prognosis utilizing evidence based medicine.

PAS 710 Summative Evaluation (4)
This course represents the final phase of the PA program and is offered annually following the completion of the program required clinical practice experiences prior to graduation. The purpose of this course is to assure that each student meets the competencies of the Physician Assistant profession. The faculty will assess each individual's medical knowledge, interpersonal skills, patient care and professionalism to assure it is satisfactory for entry into the profession. The course consists of lectures, written examinations, clinical skill demonstrations, and evaluations utilizing standardized patients in clinical simulation settings.

PHI 660 Ethical Issues in Organizations (3)
This course will examine some of the moral issues facing both private and public organizations and those who occupy leadership roles within them. Case studies will focus on timely, contemporary ethical issues in business, society and government.

PSY 610 People in Organizations (3)
Crosslisted MGT 610. This course explores individual, group and organizational processes to increase understanding of self and others in organizations. Emphasizes awareness, self-development, and self-management in the context of organizational issues such as conflict resolution, negotiations, team performance, and leadership opportunities.

PSY 635 Social Influence (3)
This course is an in-depth look at how people influence each other's attitudes and behavior, with an emphasis on management applications. A variety of influence methods will be examined.

PT 601 Foundational Science (4)
This course is the first in a series of basic science courses for physical therapists that lay a foundation for the patient management courses. Students will review the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and medical management for selected pathologies. Additional emphasis will be placed on the impact of pharmacology and medical imaging on physical therapy management.

PT 603 Surface Anatomy (1)
This course is exploration of the human musculoskeletal and peripheral nervous systems. Superficial and deep palpable anatomical features will be explored while students develop their palpation skills to locate bony landmarks muscles, tendons, joints, ligaments, peripheral nerves on the living human body.

PT 605 Clinical Exercise Physiology with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 605A
Principles of exercise physiology are presented including exercise testing and prescription for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and musculoskeletal fitness including consultation for health and wellness amongst diverse populations most commonly seen by physical therapists. Normal and abnormal responses to exercise are examined. In addition, students will identify at risk populations and barriers to health, wellness, and exercise.

PT 605A Clinical Exercise Physiology (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 605
Course description as stated on PT 605

PT 608 Biomechanics/Kinesiology with LAB (4)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 608A
This course is a study of the principles of musculoskeletal biomechanics and kinesiology including mechanical behavior and properties of bone, tendon, ligament, joint, cartilage, and skeletal muscle as applied to the human body. In this course, analysis of forces and identification of muscle functions involved in human movement, including normal posture and gait are modeled as a foundation for evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Students integrate foundational sciences with current scientific literature to substantiate biomechanical principles for clinical reasoning development.

PT 608A Biomechanics/Kinesiology (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 608
Course description as stated in PT 608

PT 610 Basic Patient Care Skills with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 610A
This course introduces the students to the principles and application of basic patient care skills, including positioning/draping, bed mobility, transfers, gait training, infection control, body mechanics, OSHA safe patient handling, basic wheelchair measurement and mobility, and documentation. Emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking skills necessary to select and perform basic patient care skills on a varied patient population safely and effectively.

PT 610A Basic Patient Care Skills (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 610
Course description as stated in PT 610

PT 611 Therapeutic Modalities with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 611A
Students will integrate information from foundational course work into new material on the principles, theories and evidence for effective use of thermal, electrical, light and mechanical agents as they apply to the clinical practice of physical therapy in conjunction with other therapeutic interventions. Skills in safe and effective application of clinical modalities will be developed during laboratory sessions that emphasize clinical decision making and patient education. . Students are introduced to leadership roles of a physical therapist through practice in delegation and supervision of the application of therapeutic modalities, complete and accurate documentation of services, and billing/coding.

PT 611A Therapeutic Modalities (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 611
Course description as stated in PT 611

PT 612 Basic Examination & Evaluation with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 612A
This course introduces the student to the patient/client management concepts from The Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Principles and application of systems review and basic examination techniques that are applicable to a variety of patient populations are learned. Emphasis is placed on differential diagnosis through clinical decision-making by integrating basic sciences of anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, and pathology with analysis and synthesis of subjective and objective patient data. The students learn upper and lower quarter screening examination techniques for musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Students develop examination skills on various patient populations in the classroom and clinic.

PT 612A Basic Examination & Evaluation (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 612
Course description as stated in PT 612

PT 615 Therapeutic Exercise with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 615A
This course introduces theory and principles of therapeutic exercise and related techniques used in the management of patients/clients with movement dysfunction s and associated disabilities linked to impairments of muscle performance, joint ROM, muscle flexibility, and postural stability. Students learn evidence-based modes of therapeutic exercise, stretching, myofascial mobilization, aquatic therapy, resistance training, neuromuscular control training, and manual therapy techniques. Students learn safe application of therapeutic exercise by using biomechanical, kinesiological, and physiological concepts as they relate to stages of connective tissue healing following injury or surgery; and develop clinical reasoning skills in the prescription of therapeutic exercise on various patient populations treated in physical therapy.

PT 615A Therapeutic Exercise (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 615
Course description as stated in PT 615

PT 624 Neuroscience with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 624A
This course reviews the functional anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system with lecture, problem-solving cases and laboratory experience. Gross anatomical structures and their function, including motor and sensory systems as well as higher cognitive regions, are discussed and correlated with clinical neurologic dysfunction. Emphasis is placed on those structures/functions of greatest importance to the successful practice of physical therapy.

PT 624A Neuroscience (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 624
Course description as stated in PT 624

PT 650 Professional Socialization I (2)
This course is the first of a two semester series. The professional socialization series (PT 650 and PT651) introduces students to the profession of physical therapy. The history of the profession is explored and the role, scope and utilization of the physical therapist in today's health care system are investigated. Foundational principles such as communication, professionalism, and theories of rehabilitation are introduced. The ethical foundations of the profession are examined and a framework for solving ethical dilemmas is presented. This course expands the student's self-awareness in order to develop a foundation for personal and professional growth.

PT 651 Professional Socialization II (2)
This course is a continuation of Professional Socialization I (PT 650). The professional socialization series (PT 650 and PT651) introduces students to the profession of physical therapy. This course introduces issues in power negotiation/ distribution, culture of disability, cultural competency, healthcare team models, and advocacy. This course expands the student's self-awareness, social awareness, and healthcare policy awareness in order to develop a foundation for effective interactions with diverse patient groups.

PT 652 Professional Issues in PT I (1)
This course precedes the first clinical experience. It provides for the introduction and discussion of policies, procedures, expectations, and issues relevant to clinical education. Emphasis is placed on professionalism, the role of the student in the clinic, documentation, feedback, supervision, delegation, and methods of evaluation. Students are introduced to the regulations of state practice acts, and are certified in the regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).

PT 661 Research in PT I (2)
This course is the first in a series of courses designed to foster the utilization of and production of research literature into the practice of physical therapy. The course explores the continuum of research, as well as the categorization of clinical research into levels of evidence. Students are introduced to evidence based physical therapy practice and the concepts of clinical research methodology and measurement. Concepts of reliability, validity, sampling, and research design are explored. Ability to critically appraise literature relevant to the practice of physical therapy is introduced in this course and fostered throughout the remainder of the professional curriculum.

PT 700 Introduction to Clinical Experience I (1)
Full-time (37+ hours per week) clinical assignment that provides the student with opportunities for supervised application of basic clinical skills including, but not limited to objective tests and measures, mobility and gait training, therapeutic exercise, modalities, documentation, and professional communication. Students will have supervised direct interaction and practice with patients, healthcare providers, and personnel in beginning the assimilation into the clinical environment.

PT 701 Introduction to Clinical Experience II (1)
Full-time (37+ hours per week) clinical assignment that provides the student with opportunities for supervised application of basic clinical skills including, but not limited to objective tests and measures, mobility and gait training, therapeutic exercise, modalities, documentation, and professional communication. Students will have supervised direct interaction and practice with patients, healthcare providers, and personnel in beginning the assimilation into the clinical environment but in a different setting from Introduction to Clinical Experience I.

PT 702 Foundational Science II (3)
This course is the second in a series of basic science courses for physical therapists that lay a foundation for the patient management courses. Students will review the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and medical management for selected pathologies. Additional emphasis will be placed on the impact of pharmacology and medical imaging on physical therapy management.

PT 703 Foundational Science III (3)
This course is the third in a series of basic science courses for physical therapists that lay a foundation for the patient management courses. Students will review the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and medical management for selected pathologies. Additional emphasis will be placed on the impact of pharmacology and medical imaging on physical therapy management.

PT 715 Patient Management: Acute Care & Cardiopulmonary with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 715A
Examination, evaluation, treatment interventions, and discharge planning for patients treated in the acute care setting, including the intensive care unit. Emphasis is placed upon synthesis, analysis, and integration of subjective and objective patient data, including integration of data from ECG, laboratory values, and pulmonary function tests for evidence based clinical decision making. This course covers common patient diagnoses seen in acute care.

PT 715A Patient Management:Acute Care and Cardiopulmonary (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 715
Course description as stated in PT 715

PT 720 Patient Management: Applied Orthopedics I with LAB (6)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 720A
A regional approach to examination, evaluation, treatment planning, therapeutic exercise, and manual therapy intervention techniques for common musculoskeletal conditions of the cervical spine, TMJ, thoracic spine and the upper extremities is studied. Emphasis is placed on clinical decision-making by integrating basic sciences of anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, and pathology with analysis and synthesis of current outcomes research on effectiveness of therapeutic exercise and manual therapy interventions. Students advance skills in screening, systems review, differential diagnosis, and patient/client management within the scope of physical therapy practice.

PT 720A Patient Management:Applied Orthopedics I (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 720
Course description as stated in PT 720

PT 721 Patient Management: Applied Orthopedics II with LAB (5)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 721A
Examination, evaluation, treatment planning, therapeutic exercise, and manual therapy intervention techniques for common musculoskeletal conditions of the lumbar spine, sacroiliac joint, and the lower extremities are studied. Emphasis is placed on clinical decision-making by integrating basic sciences of anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, and pathology with analysis and synthesis of current outcomes research on effectiveness of therapeutic exercise and manual therapy interventions. Students advance skills in screening, systems review, differential diagnosis, and patient/client management within the scope of physical therapy practice.

PT 721A Patient Management:Applied Orthopedics II (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 721
Course description as stated in PT 721

PT 722 Patient Mgmt:Neurological Rehabilitation I with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 722A
This course is the first of two courses that review the fundamentals of neuroscience as it relates to neurologic function/dysfunction, including motor control and motor learning, normal/abnormal control of movement, and clinical presentation of common neurologic dysfunctions. Emphasis is placed on evaluation and intervention techniques for patients with neurological dysfunction requiring physical therapy intervention.

PT 722A Patient Mgmt:Neurological Rehabilitation I (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 722
Course description as stated in PT 722

PT 725 Patient Mgmt:Neurological Rehabilitation II with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 725A
This course is the second of two courses that reviews the fundamentals of neuroscience as it relates to neurologic function/dysfunction, including clinical presentation, medical management, and evaluation and intervention techniques. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis of subjective and objective patient data and current research to evaluate, diagnose, and develop a physical therapy plan of care as relates to neurological diagnoses.

PT 725A Patient Mgmt:Neurological Rehabilitation II (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 725A
Course description as stated in PT 725

PT 745 Patient Management:Special Topics with LAB (3)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 745A
This course focuses on both knowledge and related skills needed for working with special populations. The topical areas include, but are not limited to women's and men's health, orthotics and prosthetics, work hardening, lymphedema, wounds and burns with an emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach to examination, evaluation, and intervention.

PT 745A Patient Management:Special Topics (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 745
Course description as stated in PT 745

PT 746 Patient Management:Lifespan I- Pediatric Conditions (3)
This course introduces students to the normal developmental changes that occur from birth to adolescence, and reviews the physical therapy management (examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention and documentation) of the pediatric patient. Emphasis is placed upon the integration of current research, family centered care, and current motor control/motor learning applied to the pediatric population.

PT 747 Patient Management:Lifespan II- Geriatric Conditions with LAB (4)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 747A
This course reviews the physical therapy management (examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention and documentation) of older adults. Emphasis is placed upon the integration of subjective and objective patient data with current research and patient/client preferences for effective clinical decision making for an older adult population. Screening for medical disease and physical therapy management of the medically complex patient will also be addressed.

PT 747A Patient Management:Lifespan II - Geriatric Conditions (LAB) (0)
Concurrent requisite(s): PT 747
Course description as stated in PT 747

PT 753 Health Care Policy (3)
This interdisciplinary course explores health care systems in the United States from a historical, political, economic, social, and financial perspective. Delivery of health care, health care policies, financing of health care, and health care reform will be discussed with an emphasis on the leadership role the health care professional can take in affecting the health care system. Areas of exploration include: cost containment, managed care, social justice issues, quality assurance, legislative and regulatory controls, long-term care, and ethical/legal issues.

PT 754 Professional Issues in PT II (1)
This course serves as a review of clinical education policies, procedures, expectations, and issues prior to the first terminal clinical experience. This course is also designed as a seminar for the discussion and application of theories, principles, duties, codes of ethics, laws, and decision-making models impacting the various facets and ethical issues impacting physical therapy practice.

PT 762 Research in PT II (3)
This course is the second in a series of courses designed to foster the utilization of research literature into the practice of physical therapy. The course will expand upon the concepts of evidenced based physical therapy practice and clinical research methodology and measurement including specific design types, analysis, and reporting.

PT 770 Administration, Consultation & Management (3)
Concepts in administration and management as they apply to the delivery of physical therapy services in health care facilities and organizations are explored, including basic administrative concepts of communication, planning and decision making, budgeting, fiscal management (including billing and coding), and marketing applied to the implementation of clinical services.

PT 855 Professional Issues In PT III (1)
This course prepares students for their ensuing practice as entry-level professionals. Topics include the clinical education requirements for the terminal clinical experience, consulting, political issues, and involvement in the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), licensure, resume writing, interviewing skills, personal finance, and one's role as a clinical educator.

PT 857 Professional Issues in PT IV (1)
This course prepares students for their ensuing practice as entry-level professionals. Topics include the clinical education requirements for the terminal clinical experiences, and provide a means for exploring interprofessional health care collaboration within in clinical education and the physical therapy profession. The students will utilize exposure to and experience with interprofessional health care practice to enhance professional growth and interprofessional collaboration.

PT 863 Research in PT III (2)
This course is the third in a series of courses designed to foster the utilization of research literature into the practice of physical therapy. This course will expand upon the previous courses with emphasis placed on the synthesis of research for clinical decision making, including applying the principles of evidence based practice to a specific clinical question.

PT 875 Elective Seminars in PT (1-3)
Exploration of advanced and novel topics in Physical Therapy.

PT 876 Independent Studies in PT (1-3)
This course allows for the exploration of special topics or experiences of interest to individual students to enrich specific courses or expand on experiences requiring in-depth study. Students, under the supervision of the physical therapy faculty, identify an area of study, establish objectives, and agree to a learning contract for credits earned.

PT 881 Clinical Education Experience I (5)
Full-time (37+ hours per week) clinical assignment that provides the intern with opportunities for supervised examination, evaluation, program planning, discharge planning, and intervention for patients requiring physical therapy in an assigned practice setting. Students experience opportunities for interaction with health-care providers and personnel at all levels of management. Expectations for students' performance are incrementally higher than on the previous Introduction to Clinical Experiences in the areas of supervision/guidance, quality, complexity, consistency, and efficiency as defined by the APTA Clinical Performance Instrument.

PT 882 Clinical Education Experience II (5)
Full-time (37+ hours per week) clinical assignment that provides the intern with opportunities for supervised examination, evaluation, program planning, discharge planning, and intervention of patients requiring physical therapy in an assigned practice setting. Students experience opportunities for interaction with health-care providers and personnel at all levels of management. Expectations for students' performance are incrementally higher than on previous internships in the areas of supervision/guidance, quality, complexity, consistency, and efficiency as defined by the APTA Clinical Performance Instrument.

PT 883 Clinical Education Experience III (5)
Full-time (37+ hours per week) clinical assignment that provides the intern with opportunities for supervised examination, evaluation, program planning, discharge planning, and intervention for patients requiring physical therapy in an assigned practice setting. Students experience opportunities for interaction with health-care providers and personnel at all levels of management. Expectations for students' performance are incrementally higher than on previous internships in the areas of supervision/guidance, quality, complexity, consistency, and efficiency as defined by the APTA Clinical Performance Instrument.

PT 884 Clinical Education Experience IV (5)
Full-time (37+ hours per week) clinical assignment that provides the intern with opportunities for supervised examination, evaluation, program planning, discharge planning, and intervention for patients requiring physical therapy in an assigned practice setting. Students experience opportunities for interaction with health-care providers and personnel at all levels of management. Expectations for students' performance are incrementally higher than on previous internships in the areas of supervision/guidance, quality, complexity, consistency, and efficiency as defined by the APTA Clinical Performance Instrument.

RDG 504 Children's Literature (3)
This course will explore how to utilize new and outstanding texts in literature and informational text for children and adolescents in preschool through high school. The focus of the class will be on how to use robust texts to strengthen language development, enhance academic language, increase motivation to read, and to build knowledge. Topics include teaching complex texts; principles of selection and evaluation of texts; teaching academic language; and using non-fiction and fiction to purposefully build knowledge.

RDG 505 Psychology of Reading (3)
This course will examine the psychological substructure of reading. Neural, perceptual, cognitive, and linguistic processes involved in reading development and disorders will be addressed. Emphasis is placed on understanding how readers extract information from the printed page and how they comprehend text. Current research findings are discussed and considered in the context of evidence-based practice in reading instruction.

RDG 511 Content Area Reading (3)
Prerequisite(s): Students seeking an initial license must be admitted to the Graduate Education Program
The purpose of this course is to provide methods and strategies for teaching reading skills to be used in the content reading subjects, particularly math, science and social studies. This reading course includes skills and strategies, which can be used to assist students' comprehension in these subjects. Teaching emphasis will be placed on comprehension, readability formulas, vocabulary development, and study strategies. Techniques and curricula for developing the interdisciplinary aspects of these subjects will be included. This course will also include adaptations of strategies to meet the needs.

RDG 515 Foundations of Effective Reading Instruction (3)
The Foundations of Literacy Effective Reading Instruction course provides a scientifically-based foundation in the cognitive, socio-cultural, linguistic, and motivational influences on literacy and language development. The course presents the key scientifically-based reading research foundations needed to understand how reading develops and effective methods and strategies used to teach literacy skills to children through young adults. Topics include understanding reading research, language development, the sequence of learning to read, the essential components of reading instruction, and an introduction to the most effective approaches to reading across the grade bands.

RDG 530 Phonics/Linguistics (3)
To teach preprofessional teachers fundamental principles and concepts of the phonological structure of language. Preprofessional teachers will learn the sound-symbol correspondences of language and understand the relationship of phonemic awareness and phonological system of language to the reading process. Preprofessional teachers will also learn about the linguistic and cognitive bases of reading.

RDG 531 Comprehension Instruction (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 515
RDG 531 is a comprehensive introduction to the development of core aspects of reading: fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. Along with these core aspects of reading, major skill domains that contribute to the development of written expression are explored. Principles of explicit and systematic instruction of these core aspects of reading and writing are introduced and practiced.

RDG 532 Advanced Phonics and Linguistics (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 530
This course is designed to build on the content in the Phonics and Linguistics course. It will include a brief review of the fundamental principles and concepts of the phonological structure of language. Instruction in English orthography, morphology and word etymology, prefixes and suffixes, Latin roots and Greek combining forms, syntax (grammar), and semantics will be examined. Students will learn why each of these skills is important to become competent in reading, spelling, and writing.

RDG 535 Assessment and Intervention of Reading (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 515 or RDG 530
This course will address the use of formal and informal assessment procedures used to design robust reading instruction/intervention for children in preschool through middle school. Additionally, research based reading interventions will be explored and analyzed.

RDG 538 Diagnosis & Remediation of Reading Problems (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 505 or 530 or RDG 617
This course will address the use of formal and informal assessment procedures used to design robust reading instruction/intervention for children in preschool through high school. This course is intended to serve as a specialized, advanced training in assessment, diagnosis and the remediation of reading problems.

RDG 540 Fluency and Comprehension Development in Reading (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 505
This course is designed to teach how to implement research-based instructional practices to build children's fluency and comprehension skills. Participants will learn the key research findings for teaching fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension; understand how to evaluate and improve current instructional practices; and learn specific research based instructional strategies and interventions to develop fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension skills.

RDG 542 The Integration of Reading Comprehension and Writing Instruction (3)
This course will explore how students learn to read and write and why some students fail to do these essential tasks effectively. Research-based instructional strategies will be illustrated, discussed, and practiced

RDG 591 Practicum in Evidence-Based Reading Instruction I (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 505, RDG 530, RDG 538
This course requires the student to implement a research based intervention program to an individual student and/or small groups of students who are struggling with reading skills. Emphasis is placed on the instructional strategies appropriate for use in effective intervention design and implementation. This practicum course includes three components: 1) learning the Orton-Gillingham method of reading intervention, 2) teaching hours and 3) supervision.

RDG 591B Practicum in Evidence-Based Reading Instruction Continued Orton Gillingham Implementation (0)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 505, RDG 530, RDG 538, RDG 591
This practicum course will require continued instruction of the individual child from the RDG 591 practicum, using the Orton Gillingham instructional method. Key learning outcomes for this course include: continued planning and implementation of Orton Gillingham instructional lessons, monitoring student growth, and working collaboratively with a supervisor to refine and improve instructional skills.

RDG 592 Practicum in Evidence-Based Reading Instruction II (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 540
This practicum course is a sequel to RDG 540. In this course students will deepen our understanding and knowledge base of reading research in the areas of fluency, vocabulary and comprehension skill development. Students will engage in readings and practicum work aimed at This practicum course is a sequel to RDG 540. In this course students will deepen our understanding and knowledge base of reading research in the areas of fluency, vocabulary and comprehension skill development. Students will engage in readings and practicum work aimed at designing classroom instruction and interventions to increase struggling reader's skills in these areas. Instructional techniques will be implemented and discussed in class.

RDG 593 Dyslexia Certificate Advanced Reading Practicum (0)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 591
Corequisite(s): RDG 532, RDG 592
The purpose of this field experience is to support students implementing Orton Gillingham into their classroom settings. Students will work with K-12 students within a classroom setting in their current school positions. This practicum is a requirement for the Dyslexia Certificate.

RDG 594 Advanced Evidence Based Practicum for Dyslexia Certificate (3)
Prerequisite(s): RDG 591
Corequisite(s): RDG 532
The purpose of this field experience is to support studentsí implementation of systematic, explicit instruction that emphasizes the structure of language across the speech sound system (phonology), the writing system (orthography), the structure of sentences (syntax), the meaningful parts of words (morphology), the relationships among words (semantics), and the organization of spoken and written discourse. This practicum is a requirement for the Dyslexia Certificate.

REL 528 Addiction & Spiritual Life (3)
This course will explain how, despite the human capacity to create and to adapt, people and society can become vulnerable to attachments and thus to addictions. These pathological relationships have their source in the spiritual life. The student will study how the particular manifestations of addiction are intimate connected to systems which serve as the primary instructor on how to attain ultimate meaning and purpose in life.

REL 539 Seminar in Spirituality: Critical Issues in Human Sexuality (3)
New Course
This upper-level seminar in spirituality explores complex and critical issues of human sexuality. Students will reflect theologically on topics of sexuality, and identify resources to develop a spirituality oriented towards human flourishing. Instructor's permission required for non-majors.

REL 541 Issue in Pauline Theology (3)
A study of the content and background of the letters of the Apostle Paul. Emphasis will be placed upon Paul's life, the literary and rhetorical structure of his letters, and the specific theological and pastoral themes addressed in the letters. Particular attention will be given to the social context of Paul's Christian communities, and how it impacts his message to them. We will also explore the impact of these issues in contemporary pastoral ministry contexts.

REL 545 Women in Christianity (3)
This course will consider all of the dimensions and dynamics of the spiritually-potent women who have imagined and enfleshed the mission of Jesus. Using short readings, input, and reflective dialogue we will consider ideas shaped by the religious experience of women throughout Christian history. Theological themes to be explored will include God, Trinity, Redemption, Reconciliation, Sacrament and Discipleship.

REL 547 Seminar Systematic Theology I (3)
This seminar-style course investigates key areas in systematic Christian theology in their historical and contemporary development, including Christology, doctrine of God, pneumatology, ecclesiology, soteriology, theological anthropology, liturgy and sacraments, and revelation, doctrine, and creed. Particular attention is given to theological hermeneutics, analysis, and reflection.

REL 548 Seminar Systematic Theology II (3)
This seminar-style course investigates key areas in systematic Christian theology in their historical and contemporary development, including Christology, doctrine of God, pneumatology, ecclesiology, soteriology, theological anthropology, liturgy and sacraments, and revelation, doctrine, and creed. Particular attention is given to theological hermeneutics, analysis, and reflection.

REL 549 Roman Christianity (3)
This 3 credit hour course is designed to provide the student with on-site learning and experience of early Christianity in the city of Rome. This course takes place during Spring Break, and will require both pre and post assignments, meetings prior to the trip to Rome, participation in tours and lectures while in Rome and surrounding areas, and a follow up final paper due at the end of the Spring semester.

REL 563 Life Through Death (3)
Students in the graduate program in Spiritual and Pastoral Care are engaged in a three-fold process of increasing their self-understanding, deepening their capacity to minister to families throughout the life-cycle, and developing a theological perspective that is integrated with both personal and professional functioning. The human encounter with death and dying poses a significant challenge to persons as spiritual, psychological and social beings. By focusing in an in-depth manner on this issue, all three processes mentioned above are facilitated, and students are helped to develop increased competency to respond in a meaningful humane and theologically informed manner to these challenges.

REL 597 Special Topics (3)
Students explore a specific area of religion that deepens previous learning about themes related to world religion, spirituality, systematic theology, or the sociology of religion. The research is interdisciplinary and conducted in the context of a semester-long course, usually enhancing the graduate student's ability to develop the integrating project.

RPS 500 Coming to the Well,Theology of Ministry in a Changing World (3)
Jesus encountered the woman at the well under the sun's intense light. What was revealed was a new paradigm of service, relationality, and compassion. As disciple, the woman was drawn by the Spirit's coaxing into new horizons of care for her community. Like the woman of the gospel, we will use theological reflection informed by contemporary pastoral theology to explore the dynamic and transformative intersection of God, ministry and minister. Theological themes of healing, suffering, forgiveness, growth, hope, and wellness will be covered. Flowing from a specific case study or ministry context, students will craft a comprehensive theology of ministry.

RPS 504 Personal Spirituality (3)
The principles and methods of the development of a personal spirituality using the resources of both the Eastern and Western religious traditions. The incorporation of life experiences and decisions into religious growth.

RPS 506 Spirituality & Wellness (3)
Judeo-Christian spirituality is an "incarnational spirituality" at its core. In Genesis, God "walks in the garden" to encounter Adam and Eve. Moses first encounters God in a bush and his people are freed through natural plagues and physical death. The prophets see God's hand in the political-social-economic events of the day, and call people to live justly through it all. Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is born as a human being to show us that the kingdom of God is among us in the here and now. In this spirituality, God enters the "natural world" to show us how to live as whole, healthy humans, through the exercising of our freedom of choice, our "Free Will," in accord with the Divine Will. This course will explore the connection between a deeply incarnational spirituality and "wellness," a state of wholeness mediated through the "divine challenge" of free will exercised "on earth as it is [archetypically] in heaven."

RPS 510 Socio-Ecological Dimensions of Pastoral Care (3)
This course examines the connection between pastoral care, human ecology, religion, and theology. This course will include an overview of contemporary pastoral care methodologies which attempt to embrace the whole person and their environment. Using a systems approach, we will examine pastoral care and spirituality through the lens of human ecology, the study of the interdependence of humans with all of nature. This course will consider pastoral care interventions that promote relationship building the environmental ethics, using the resources of the Christian tradition.

RPS 512 Pastoral Practicum (3-6)
The purpose of the Pastoral Practicum course is to enable students to develop theological understanding, professional skills, ministerial and pastoral competence, personal integration through practice in actual ministry and reflection upon that ministry and a depending spirituality of the pastoral caregiver.

RPS 514 Spirituality of Leadership (3)
This course explores the relationship between one's personal spirituality and effective leadership. Further, it considers leadership in the workplace as a personal calling. The course will explore one's innate desire for integrity of life, and will examine the common good as both the purpose of business, and as necessary for human development. The good habits of acting, known as virtues, will be considered. The application of virtue to practical situations in the workplace, and in the world at large, will allow the principles of Christian social teaching to be integrated with management theory.

RPS 526 Spirit of Johannine Literature (3)
This course will examine the major spiritual and theological themes and trends in Johannine study. Students will be introduced to the significant themes and theology of both the Gospel and the Epistles. Various approaches to the New Testament will be presented.

RPS 542 Critical Issues in Ethics (3)
One of the pastoral minister's many functions is to educate people in their faith, and one of the most challenging times this must be done is when a person is facing an important ethical decision. Poignant ethical questions face us every day and for many people they pose significant challenges of faith. In this course, we explore the field of Catholic theological ethics. Students will examine the foundations of the Church's ethical tradition and propose a "code of ethics" for the pastoral minister. We then explore a number of "critical issues" from three primary topic areas: social ethics, sexual ethics, and medical ethics. The overall purpose of this course is to offer the pastoral minister 1) knowledge of what the Roman Catholic Church teaches concerning pressing ethical issues, as well as why it teaches what it does; and 2) a foundation upon which to draw when faced with the question "What should I do?" in light of a particular ethical dilemma.

RPS 546 Exploring the Sacred (3)
This course seeks to explore the ways in which we may encounter the sacred in our lived experience, rather than in formal creeds or religious institutions. Students will examine the spiritual/sacred dimensions of their world by looking through a variety of different lenses, and using the tools of several different disciplines to bring those experiences into focus. Students can expect to develop a clearer understanding of the experience of the sacred, by exploring their own stories, and the stories of others as those are presented in both sacred and secular texts. The course will pay special attention to the significance that culture has in shaping and interpreting the experience of the sacred, and the variety of responses that may emerge out of this experience.

RPS 547 Christian Social Justice (3)
This course will acquaint students with both concrete efforts by Christians in support of social justice and with the Christian premises that underlie these efforts. Topics include economic justice, religious liberty and church-state relations, rights of women and minorities, war and peace, pro-life issues, and environmental ethics.

RPS 549 Theology of Church (3)
New Course
Theological models of the church and the theology of Vatican II will be reviewed. Beginning with the Hebrew notion of "A People Gathered" and ending with an in-depth study of models of church, this course examines the social, religious, and spiritual elements of church.

RPS 557 World Religions (3)
The core question that people have asked from the beginning of reflective thought can be summed up in one sentence: What is the meaning or purpose of my life? In a world filled with conflict and war, in a country held bound by consumerism and fear, the answers provided by some of the major world religions can show us ways to live a vibrant life. Pre-supposing a basic Christian grounding of the majority of class participants, we will study the age-old wisdom found in Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism and Islam, with emphasis on how this knowledge can energize us to become peacemakers and healers of our global home.

RPS 560 Pastoral Care & Counseling (3)
This course helps students develop the skills that will allow them to minister to individuals, couples or family systems in distress. Students will learn how to develop a "helping relationship" that will support efforts at care and counseling, and to use basic helping skills informed by an understanding of personal, marital and family dynamics. The fundamental components of the helping relationship will be defined as active listening, engagement, empathy, and challenging. Students will deepen their ability to practice and apply these skills in a manner that promotes healing and growth within the persons and the systems those persons are involved in. Students taking this course should not expect to emerge from it as marital and family therapists. Rather, they will develop skills that will help them engage others in a manner that promotes spiritual and emotional growth and change, and facilitates and supports people getting whatever further help may be needed. Students in this course will reflect on the "pastoral" nature of what they are doing as helpers, by becoming clearer that the perspectives they bring to the counseling relationship are not derived only from particular psychological points of view, but also from their sense of themselves as pastoral persons engaged in acts of ministry, and therefore, from their theology and spirituality.

RPS 566 A Land Where You Can Eat: Sustainable Foodways & Christian Spirituality (3)
This course examines food production, distribution, and consumption using practical theological method. Students develop a spirituality of just food, paying special attention to social structures and individual choices that promote and/or inhibit sustainable foodways.

RPS 567 Healing and Loving Creation:An Ecological Spirituality for Our Time (3)
Discipleship in our modern world increasingly necessitates an ecological commitment to embrace a green lifestyle. God's fidelity to "renew the face of Earth" as a planet of peace and compassion inspires new ways of thinking about and responding to the dignity of all creation. We will consider the contemplative encounter with God in nature that compels us to embrace our potential as co-creators, loving and healing Earth.

RPS 568 Bringing about a Sustainable Reign of God (3)
This course explores why we are called to live more sustainably and gives practical ways to live that are more in keeping with Gospel teaching. We will look at the signs of times in which we are now living and apply Jesus' message of love and compassion towards all of God's creation. We will also look at ways in which we can spread this message to others.

RPS 569 Environmental Ethics:A Call to Conscience in a Time of Climate Change (3)
In a time when the adverse effects of anthropogenic climate change are beginning to be felt, this course will examine how to respond to a call to conscience from a Catholic theological perspective. We will explore the principles of faith and reason and the resources of the Catholic tradition regarding stewardship, the common good, and the option for the poor and vulnerable as they relate to climate change. In analyzing contemporary environmental problems, we will engage in dialogue in order to seek personal and social courses of action to care for creation.

RPS 571 Disabling Theology (3)
New Course
Using a practical theological method that dialogues between theology and experience, this course explores the social injustice of ableism, as well as the search for the common good, in relationship to persons who are differently abled in body, mind, and/or psyche. Particular attention is paid to theological resources and their personal and professional implications for ministry.

RPS 572 Hands Up, Don't Shoot:Practical Theology for Racial Justice (3)
New Course
This course examines the social injustices of racism and ethnocentrism from theological perspectives. Methods of practical theology are used to develop reflexive theological habits for critical analysis and social action.

RPS 575 Integrating Project (3)
The subject of the integrating project is the research, design, implementation, and evaluation of a pastoral ministry area based on the learning accomplished in the program. This component is designed to be a synthesizing experience, which blends theory with practice and academic studies with work experience. The final project is linked as closely as possible to the student's present or projected ministry. The student will complete the project under the supervision of program faculty. The thesis paper will integrate and reflect the spiritual and pastoral care and theological learning from the curriculum.

RPS 590 Appalachian Culture and Spirituality (3)
This course will be a field experience in the Appalachian Mountains in Kentucky and will focus on understanding Appalachian lifestyle, behavior, and family, social, ecological, and political systems. Students will experience the richness of mountain life through Appalachian educators, artisans, and leaders.

RPS 591 Cherokee Culture & Spirituality (3)
This course is about what has gone well for the Native Americans as people of faith, people of hope and people of determination. The Cherokee have dealt with the developing tourism industry that surrounds them in the Smokey Mountains, while stewarding the resources of the area with grace and wisdom. The Cherokee natives share the value of relationship, spiritual and artistic heritage and living with the consequences of the Trail of Tears.

RPS 599 Special Topics (1-3)
This course is graduate research study in completion of the Integrating Project.

RPS 603 History of Spirituality (3)
New Course
This course examines the development of Christian Spirituality from the post-apostolic age to the present through analysis of the key texts and figures in Christian history. The student will be exposed to those texts and authors who were most influential in shaping Christian spirituality and the understanding of the spiritual life throughout Christian history, and will gain an understanding of those texts within their historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis will also be placed on the differences between male and female interpretations of Christian spirituality, as well as the differences between monastic/clerical spirituality and the spirituality of the laity, and how this has shaped Christian self-understanding.

SED 515 Human Exceptionalities Across the Lifespan (3)
This course is a survey of human exceptionalities, exploring historical and legal aspects in the field of special education, the nature and needs of individuals with special needs, and the roles of schools, parents and society in supporting individuals with special needs. An overview of the federal and state laws governing the education of students with disabilities is presented. Lifelong issues in living with a disability are explored.

SED 521 Communication Develop & Theories for Environments (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 515 and EDU 501 or Equivalent
This course explores theories of first and second language acquisition. Emphasis is on affective, cultural, linguistic, and cognitive factors that influence the language acquisition process with application to classroom practice. An overview of the nature and needs of children with communication disorders will also be included. A clinical experience is required with this course.

SED 522 Formal & Informal Assessment for Special Education (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 515, EDU 501, SED 521 and Graduate Admission
This course examines the evaluation process from referral to placement in special education and the challenge for assessing students who come from culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds. Emphases on formative and summative assessment measures are included. A clinical experience is required with this course.

SED 524 School, Home Support and Intervention Pre-Kindergarten Special Needs (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 521, SED 534
This introductory course covers the educational and emotional needs of young children with disabilities and the techniques for implement a "whole child" and inclusive educational approach. The course promotes an understanding of stressors, transitions, and issues that families of children with disabilities may encounter during their child's early intervention. Approaches such as transdisciplinary teaming, family-centered intervention and cross cultural competencies will be covered. Multicultural research findings on roles of families in education and uses of language and literacy in the community will be examined. Federal and state regulations pertaining to early response will be included. A cross cultural perspective on how families view disabilities and interventions will be included. 10 Field Hours Required.

SED 531 Curriculum & Methods for Multicultural Special Ed Moderate & Intense (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 515, SED 532, EDU 501 and Graduate Admission
This course provides a study of curriculum programming, instructional environments and strategies, and assessment techniques for use with multicultural students with moderate to intense needs. The areas of social skills, behavior, functional academics, technology, communication, and transition are covered. Curriculum adaptations and support in the general education curriculum are addressed. Best practices in community-based instruction, authentic assessment, and ecological evaluations are emphasized. Students must participate in a practicum along with this course. Failure to complete the practicum will result in failure of the course.

SED 532 Nature & Needs of Special Education (M/I) (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 515, EDU 501, and Graduate Admission
This course surveys the areas of moderate to intense disabilities. The course will present an overview of causes, characteristics, and theories of individuals who are served in moderate to intense programs. Emphasis is placed on the educational implications of medical and health issues of multicultural learners. The course also addresses the topic of quality of life issues for multicultural learners with moderate to intense disabilities. A field experience is required for this course.

SED 533 I Special Education Practicum Level I (1)
Prerequisite(s): Graduate Admission
This introductory field experience provides the intervention specialist teacher candidate with hands-on experience in designing, implementing and evaluating lessons designed to address the unique needs of students with disabilities in secondary environments.

SED 533 II Special Education Practicum Level II (1)
Prerequisite(s): Graduate Admission, SED 533 I
This field experience provides the intervention specialist teacher candidate with hands-on experience in designing, implementing and evaluating lessons designed to address the unique needs of students with disabilities in middle environments.

SED 533 III Special Education Practicum Level III (1)
Prerequisite(s): Graduate Admission
This advanced field experience provides the intervention specialist teacher candidate with hands-on experience in designing, implementing and evaluating lessons designed to address the unique needs of students with disabilities in early childhood grades K-3 environments.

SED 534 Methods/Materials for Pre-Kindergarten Special Needs (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 521
Theories of early childhood development as they relate to all aspects of the classroom will be examined. Focus on creating developmentally appropriate learning environments that are culturally responsive to the needs of young children ages 3-5 with special needs; utilizing an integrated, hands-on approach to curriculum; and developing classroom management strategies that foster development of preschool to kindergarten behavior. The early intervention specialist's role as facilitator in the learning process is stressed, with emphasis on understanding physical, cognitive, social, emotional and cultural needs as they relate to the learning process. Special emphasis on understanding risk and resiliency factors; how to create protective environments that foster healthy development; partnerships with other professionals and families on early intervention will be examined. Case studies and on-site observations of learning facilities and planning of educational experiences appropriate for early intervention are included. 10 Field Hours Required.

SED 611 Curriculum & Methods for Special Education (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 515, EDU 501, SED 521 and Admission to the TEAM MSE Program
This course examines curriculum options and evidence practices available for teaching students who comes from a culturally and/or linguistically diverse background and are in need of specialized instruction.

SED 630 Teaching in an Inclusive Setting (3)
This course focuses on the skills teachers need to fully integrate students with special needs into general education settings. Models of teacher consultation and collaboration for instructional purposes and methods to modify teaching techniques, course content, materials, and grading procedures to accommodate students with special needs in inclusive classrooms are covered. A 25-hour field component in an inclusive education setting is included.

SED 642 SED Apprenticeship I (1)
Prerequisite(s): SED 515, RDG 515, EDU 501
The first apprenticeship provides an in-depth field experience in a special education setting throughout the first academic quarter. Students collaborate with a mentor teacher 28-30 hours per week in a partner school. The apprenticeship entails supervised teaching in a special education setting to facilitate the teacher candidate's ability to instruct students in the skills related to all subject areas of the curriculum, including literacy, mathematics, science, and social studies. Issues especially related to fluency, reading comprehension, and behavioral issues are embedded with apprenticeship assignments.

SED 643 SED Second Apprenticeship II (1)
Prerequisite(s): SED 515, RDG 515, EDU 501, SED 642, and SED 521
The second apprenticeship provides an in-depth field experience in a special education setting throughout the second academic quarter. Students collaborate with a mentor teacher 28-30 hours per week in a partner school. The apprenticeship entails supervised teaching in a special education setting to facilitate the teacher candidate's ability to instruct students in the skills related to all subject areas of the curriculum, including literacy, mathematics, science, and social studies. Issues especially related to fluency, reading comprehension, and behavioral issues are embedded with apprenticeship assignments.

SED 662 Pre-Kindergarten Special Needs Practicum (1)
Prerequisite(s): SED 521, SED 534, SED 665
Guided observation and practice teaching, plus meeting with college mentor; graduate students learn to apply developmentally appropriate strategies that are culturally responsive to early intervention special education environments. Students will complete a 55 hour practicum for a full semester

SED 665 Medical Issues & Learning Process for Pre-Kindergarten Special Needs (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 521
This course examines the medical aspects of specific health conditions associated with learners with special needs for ages 3 - 5. The integration of health care plans into classroom instruction is covered. Medical emergencies, physical management and training techniques for teaching personal care are covered. Issues in participating on transdisciplinary teams and the roles of community medical personnel are included. Intervention strategies for managing medical and educational needs for children with severe behavior problems will be covered. 10 Field Hours required.

SED 680 Foundations and Research of Gifted Education (3)
This course is a study of leadership and systems change. Students will explore what leadership is, characteristics of effective leaders, and reflect upon their own skills, knowledge, and disposition as leaders. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how to lead systems change to create inclusive educational environments for all students. This course focuses on establishing a basic foundation for teachers who work with students who are gifted: academically and intellectually. Foundations and Research is designed in accordance with the National Association of Gifted Children standards and the Ohio Gifted Intervention Specialist Endorsement standards and will establish theory, philosophy, legislation, theory and trends in Gifted Education. Ultimately, students will critically assess such philosophies, practices, and theory and apply and evaluate their effectiveness and impact in today's classroom.

SED 681 Underrepresented Populations of Gifted Students (3)
This course focuses on high-ability students from underserved populations including those who are limited English proficient, disabled, or from minority or low-income backgrounds. We will explore the issues of race, class, gender, and disability status as they interact with the construct of giftedness. Finally we will examine the obstacles to identifying students from diverse backgrounds, learning characteristics and behaviors of underrepresented gifted populations, and equitable and unbiased assessments

SED 682 Curriculum and Instruction of Gifted Students (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 680
This course focuses on current theory and principles of differentiation and specific strategies that adapt instruction in order to meet the characteristics of gifted learners. Specific differentiation strategies that relate to student differences with high levels of ability are applied in the classroom setting.

SED 683 Creativity and Critical Thinking in Gifted Education (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 682
This course focuses on theories, research, practical strategies and resources on creativity and critical thinking, with an emphasis on specific teaching exercises and lesson plans, and sources for additional materials for developing creativity and critical thinking with gifted learners.

SED 684 Leadership and Coordination of Gifted Education Programs (3)
Prerequisite(s): SED 682
This course is designed to develop an understanding of program policy, administration and evaluation related to gifted education. State policy and regulations regarding identification, programming, education plans, and funding will be addressed. Advocacy and communication, professional development and in-service design will be examined to further the development of a school program.

SOC 680 Culture & Technology (3)
This course addresses how technology drives much of social and cultural change, and these technological innovations and changes often happen first in the world of work. New technology brings new winners and new losers in most social systems. New technology almost always comes with grand promises of its potential but lack of planning for its failures, negative side effects and the losers it often leaves. A better understanding of these technology-caused social forces can help leaders and managers prepare for the impact of technology on their organization, their workers and their communities.